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So I gave up implementing my own memoryleak tracking (in this question http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1855406/overloading-new-and-delete-problem ) and try to use the MFC functions to identify my memory leaks. So I do exactly what's described here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8ky2wh64%28VS.80%29.aspx

this is my code:

#ifdef _DEBUG
	CMemoryState oldMemState, newMemState, diffMemState;
	oldMemState.Checkpoint();
#endif

	int* test = new int;

#ifdef _DEBUG
	newMemState.Checkpoint();
	if( diffMemState.Difference( oldMemState, newMemState ) )
	{
		TRACE( "Memory leaked!\n" );
		diffMemState.DumpStatistics();
		diffMemState.DumpAllObjectsSince();
	}
#endif

but instead of outputting any useful information, the output shows

	Memory leaked!
		0 bytes in 0 Free Blocks.
		4 bytes in 1 Normal Blocks.
		0 bytes in 0 CRT Blocks.
		0 bytes in 0 Ignore Blocks.
		0 bytes in 0 Client Blocks.
		Largest number used: 0 bytes.
		Total allocations: 4 bytes.
		Dumping objects ->
	{714538} normal block at 0x029628C8, 4 bytes long.
Data: <    > CD CD CD CD 
f:\dd\vctools\vc7libs\ship\atlmfc\src\mfc\thrdcore.cpp(306) : {714536} client block at 0x022F6040, subtype c0, 68 bytes long.
  a CWinThread object at $022F6040, 68 bytes long
	{714535} normal block at 0x03B607A8, 4 bytes long.
Data: <@`/ > 40 60 2F 02 
	{714534} normal block at 0x03B58C70, 8 bytes long.
Data: < N      > F0 4E B5 03 00 00 00 00 
	{714533} client block at 0x03B54EF0, subtype c0, 12 bytes long.
	a CEvent object at $03B54EF0, 12 bytes long
	{714524} normal block at 0x022FFFC8, 1 bytes long.
Data: < > CD 
	{714523} normal block at 0x03B608C0, 12 bytes long.
Data: <    x   h   > E8 07 B6 03 78 08 B6 03 68 97 9A 02 
	{714522} normal block at 0x03B60878, 12 bytes long.
Data: <    0   P   > C0 08 B6 03 30 08 B6 03 50 82 9A 02 
	{714521} normal block at 0x03B60830, 12 bytes long.
Data: <x           > 78 08 B6 03 E8 07 B6 03 88 81 9A 02 
	{714520} normal block at 0x03B607E8, 12 bytes long.
Data: <0           > 30 08 B6 03 C0 08 B6 03 CD CD CD CD 
	{714515} normal block at 0x03B606B0, 104 bytes long.
Data: <                > 00 00 00 00 CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD 
	{714510} normal block at 0x03B60668, 12 bytes long.
Data: <            > C8 03 B6 03 20 06 B6 03 88 AC 9A 02 
	{714509} normal block at 0x03B60620, 12 bytes long.
Data: <h       h   > 68 06 B6 03 D8 05 B6 03 68 97 9A 02

......... and this is going and going and going and the number in the brackets is counting down (i actually never was patient enough to wait to let it count down to 1)

it's always starting at this high number 714538 so - what I am doing wrong?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
I believe that high number is a line number. –  Synetech Dec 6 '09 at 20:14
    
no, according to the docs "The numbers in braces at the beginning of most lines specify the order in which the objects were allocated. The most recently allocated object has the highest number and appears at the top of the dump." but there was only a single int allocated on the heap between the two checkpoints, so such a high number doesn't make sense –  Mat Dec 6 '09 at 21:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From here it shows that DumpAllObjectsSince() should be called on the CMemoryState object you called Checkpoint() on.

So your code should be:

    {
            TRACE( "Memory leaked!\n" );
            diffMemState.DumpStatistics();
            //diffMemState.DumpAllObjectsSince();
            oldMemState.DumpAllObjectsSince();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Hehe that's it :) thank you very much! –  Mat Dec 6 '09 at 22:05

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