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Suppose I repeatedly generate random integers from 0-9 until a given number comes out. What I need is a function that counts how many integers are generated until this happens. Please help me with this.

This is what I have tried, I put 1000 becasue it is big enough but I don't think it is correct because my number can come after 1000 iterations.

for i in range(1000):
  d = randint()
  if d <> 5:
     cnt = cnt + 1
  if d == 5:
     break
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Instead of simulating, you could just sample once from a geometric distribution with probability 0.1. –  Neil G Sep 2 '13 at 4:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Suppose 5 is the number you are expecting:

sum(1 for _ in iter(lambda: randint(0, 9), 5))

You can add 1 if you want to include the last number.

Explanation:

  • iter(function, val) returns an iterator that calls function until val is returned.
  • lambda: randint(0, 9) is function (can be called) that returns randint(0, 9).
  • sum(1 for _ in iterator) calculates the length of an iterator.
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10  
I don't think generator expressions and anonymous functions are really in OP's grasp if he's still struggling with loops. –  Blender Sep 2 '13 at 1:08
    
what is the meaning of "_"? –  John Sep 2 '13 at 1:10
    
It is just a variable, you can rename it as you want. See my edited answer. –  elyase Sep 2 '13 at 1:11
    
The second one (the list() one) is not so great, because you may be building a very big list before the desired value is encountered, and it may eat a lot of memory. –  Hammerite Sep 2 '13 at 1:16
1  
+1 for brevity. But your call to randint should be on (0,9) not (0,10). Randint includes both endpoints. –  Chris Johnson Sep 2 '13 at 1:40

itertools.count is often neater than using a while loop with an explicit counter

import random, itertools

for count in itertools.count():
    if random.randint(0, 9) == 5:
        break

If you want the count to include the iteration that generates 5, just start the count at 1 using itertools.count(1)

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from random import randint
count = 0
while randint(0, 9) != 5:
   count += 1
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A few things:

  • If you want your loop to continue until you stop it, use a while loop instead of a for loop.
  • You should use != as the inequality operator instead of <>.

Here's something to get you started:

import random

count = 0

while True:
    n = random.randint(0, 9)
    count += 1

    if n == 5:
        break

You could also write:

import random

count = 1
n = random.randint(0, 9)

while n != 5:
    count += 1
    n = random.randint(0, 9)

Converting it into a function is left as an exercise for the reader.

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1  
Your answers (as is the OP's own code) are off by one if they're suppose to count how many random integers were generated. –  martineau Sep 2 '13 at 1:23
1  
<> is used in pre-python 3 and replaced by the parser with !=. –  BSH Sep 2 '13 at 1:32
    
@Sp.: Thanks, I never knew that. I thought it was just for pre-2.6. –  Blender Sep 2 '13 at 1:38
    
@martineau: You're right, I misread the question. –  Blender Sep 2 '13 at 1:49
    
+1 i love exercise –  pyCthon Sep 2 '13 at 1:56

This should work:

from random import randint
# Make sure 'cnt' is outside the loop (otherwise it will be overwritten each iteration)
cnt = 0
# Use a while loop for continuous iteration
while True:
    # Python uses '!=' for "not equal", not '<>'
    if randint(0, 9) != 5:
        # You can use '+=' to increment a variable by an amount
        # It's a lot cleaner than 'cnt = cnt + 1'
        cnt += 1 
    else: 
        break
print cnt

or, in function form:

from random import randint
def func():
    cnt = 0
    while True: 
        if randint(0, 9) != 5:
            cnt += 1 
        else: 
            break
    return cnt
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