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I am seeing an JVM issue when I am running my application and I simply to below java commands:

C:\Users\optitest>I:\j2sdk\bin\java -version
java version "1.6.0_17"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_17-b04)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 14.3-b01, mixed mode)

C:\Users\optitest>I:\j2sdk\bin\java -Xms4g -version
Error occurred during initialization of VM
Incompatible minimum and maximum heap sizes specified

Even Xms is set to 128M does not work:

C:\Users\optitest>I:\j2sdk\bin\java -Xms128m -version
Error occurred during initialization of VM
Incompatible minimum and maximum heap sizes specified

Works only when Xms is set to 64M or less:

C:\Users\optitest>I:\j2sdk\bin\java -Xms64m -version
java version "1.6.0_17"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_17-b04)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 14.3-b01, mixed mode)

The interesting thing is if I specify Xmx, then it works well.

C:\Users\optitest>I:\j2sdk\bin\java -Xms4g -Xmx4g-version
java version "1.6.0_17"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_17-b04)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 14.3-b01, mixed mode)

C:\Users\optitest>I:\j2sdk\bin\java -Xms4g -Xmx8g-version
java version "1.6.0_17"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_17-b04)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 14.3-b01, mixed mode)

More interesting thing is: All above commands run well on another machine with same OS (Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise SP1) & same jdk version. Physical Memory is 16GB.

Any idea?

Thanks, Xiaofeng

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Any idea?

Well the obvious conclusion is that if you want to use -Xms to specify the initial heap size, and you want to set the size to a value that is larger than the default maximum heap size, you need to specify a maximum heap size.

The reason that you are getting different results on different machines is that the JVM computes the default heap size in different ways, depending on the version of Java and on the execution platform. In some cases it is a constant. In others, it depends on the amount of physical memory on the system.

Just set the maximum heap size explicitly and you won't have this problem.


If you want to find out what the default heap size is for a given machine, run this command:

    java -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal -version 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Stephen. The problem is on the "trouble" machine, it is a 64bit OS, with 16GB physical memory. I personally do not think setting Xms128m should have any issue, as obviously default Xmx should not be < 128M. –  Xiaofeng Sep 2 '13 at 6:12
    
Just to clarify: Both "trouble" machine and "trouble-free" machine are running 64bit Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise 64bit, with 16GB physical memory. –  Xiaofeng Sep 2 '13 at 6:17
    
Well, clearly it "has an issue" ... whether you think it should be or not. If you are unhappy with my explanation, I suggest that you ask Oracle via your Java support contract ... or download the OpenJDK 6 source code and try to figure out what is actually happening for yourself. Telling us that you think it "should not happen" is ... well ... moot, since it clearly does happen. –  Stephen C Sep 2 '13 at 8:09
    
Hmm, please do not get me wrong. Your comment is really helpful, I was just curious why 2 machine work differently. The good thing is: I use a newer version of JDK (1.6_u17 does not support this option) to run the command with -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal, the result surprise me. The "trouble" machine showes "uintx MaxHeapSize := 0 {product}" while the "good" machine showes "uintx MaxHeapSize := 4160749568 {product}". Now it seems to be tricky... Why MaxHeapSize is ZERO on the trouble one? –  Xiaofeng Sep 2 '13 at 9:57
    
I'm guessing, but maybe there is some OS setting (access control? security?) that prevents the JVM from finding out how much physical memory there is on the "trouble" machine. –  Stephen C Sep 2 '13 at 12:14

The heap size of your machine depends on lot more than, how much Ram you got.!!

Maximum heap size for 32 bit or 64 bit JVM looks easy to determine by looking at addressable memory space like 2^32 (4GB) for 32 bit JVM and 2^64 for 64 bit JVM.

You can not really set 4GB as maximum heap size for 32 bit JVM using -Xmx JVM heap options. You will get could not create the Java virtual machine Invalid maximum heap size: -Xmx error.

You can look here for a well explained document about the heap size.

Another important thing is that, You can only postpone the OutofMemmory Exception by in creasing the Heap size. Unless your clean up your memory you will get the exception one time or another..!! Use the applications like Visual VM to understand what's going on in the background. I suggest you try to Optimise code, for increasing performance.

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Thanks, Dileep. As my comment made to Stephen, Both "trouble" and "trouble-free" machines are Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise 64bit, with 16GB physical memory. Just be curious why setting Xms128m does not work, as default allocated Xmx should be definitly > 128m on the 16GB physical memory. –  Xiaofeng Sep 2 '13 at 6:20
    
@Xiaofeng Upvote and Accept the answer if your are satisfied with my answer :) meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/… –  Dileep Sep 2 '13 at 6:27

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