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Extends.

I have:

struct Coord
{
  int row, col ;

  bool operator<( const Coord& other ) const
  {
    return row < other.row && col < other.col ;
  }
} ;

I'm trying to create a map<Coord, Node*>, where you can look up a Node* by Coord.

The problem is, it has bugs. Lookups into the map<Coord, Node*> by Coord are returning the wrong ones.

I'm having difficulty figuring out if this is appropriate or not.

Wikipedia says, map [keys] requires a strict weak ordering. Have I done this wrong? Is there a way to make it work, or should keys for a map be simple values that can be "strictly ordered"?

Basically the question is what is required for a custom struct to work as a key for my std::map?

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2  
Can you be more specific about "has bugs"? Does your code compile? Return the wrong results? Crash? –  Mark Lacey Dec 6 '09 at 21:06
    
std::map does not have any bugs. At least in MS STL that i have seen. Also wikipedia is not the best source for RTFN. –  Captain Comic Dec 6 '09 at 21:09
    
What I mean by "has bugs" is just the following sentence: "Lookups into the map<Coord, Node*> by Coord are returning the wrong ones." –  bobobobo Dec 6 '09 at 21:22
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5 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Yes you could very well have a problem with strict-weak ordering. Odds are its not working like you'd expect. Consider:

  bool operator<( const Coord& other ) const
  {
    return row < other.row && col < other.col ;
  }

obj1 (this) row: 2 col: 3

obj2 row: 3 col: 2

obj1 < obj2? => false

ok well then:

obj2 < obj1? => false

The only conclusion is that they must be equal (based on your < operator). Since this is a map, and keys are unique, both keys reselve to the same spot. This behavior may-or-may not be what you expect, but it sounds like it probably isn't.

What you need is to make a precedence between row/col so that < really works like you'd expect:

  bool operator<( const Coord& other ) const
  {
     // look at row first, if row is equal, check column.
     if (row < other.row)
     {
         return true;
     }
     else if (row == other.row)
     {
         return col < other.col ;
     }
     return false;
  }
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or else return row < other.row || (row == other.row && col < other.col) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 6 '09 at 21:41
1  
It isn't just the fact that the comparison may not do what is wanted that is the problem, it's the fact the equivalence under the original definition isn't an equivalence relation and this violates the requirements for use as a key in std::map. –  Charles Bailey Dec 6 '09 at 21:47
    
+1, this is why professionals use tie(col, row) < tie(other.col, other.row) ;) –  avakar Dec 6 '09 at 22:05
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You probably want:

 bool operator<( const Coord& other ) const
  {
    if ( row < other.row ) {
       return true;
    }
    else if ( row == other.row ) {
       return col < other.col;
    }
    else {
       return false ;
    }
  }

or vice versa. This one has bitten me a few times too!

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Thanks for the acceptance, but I thought Doug T's answer was much better, and includes what I wrote. –  anon Dec 6 '09 at 21:28
    
Well, yours answers the question, and was earlier. But I'll change it. –  bobobobo Dec 6 '09 at 21:30
    
thanks for the compliment. –  Doug T. Dec 6 '09 at 21:31
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try this:

struct Coord
{
  int row, col ;

  bool operator<( const Coord& other ) const
  {
    if (row != other.row)
      return row < other.row;

    return col < other.col ;
  }
} ;
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bool operator<(const Coord& other) const
{
    return row < other.row
        || row ==other.row
        && col < other.col;
}
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It's more correct to not use the == operator. To compare two elements with operator<, they should only have to define operator<. –  GManNickG Dec 6 '09 at 21:19
    
@GMan We are talking about comparing integer here. –  anon Dec 6 '09 at 21:20
2  
How about parentheses to make it clear that && has higher precedence than ||? –  Mark Lacey Dec 6 '09 at 21:20
    
@Neil In the abstract it's a very good point. You don't want your code to break because you change the underlying types. –  Mark Lacey Dec 6 '09 at 21:22
1  
No, it doesn't, but I do make an attempt to make the requirements of underlying types minimal. If you only use < here, then the underlying types only have to define an operator<, not both operator< and operator==. Also, although it may seem unnatural to avoid == here, it seems satisfying that operator< only be defined in terms of operator< of the types it's comparing. –  Mark Lacey Dec 6 '09 at 21:38
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For a comparison function to impose a strict weak ordering on the set of values for your object, one of the conditions is that equivalence must be transitive. a and b are said to be equivalent if (in C++ syntax) !(a < b) && !(b < a) is true.

Your operator< fails this requirement. Consider a = { 1, 3 }, b = { 3, 2 }, c = { 2, 1 }. In this case neither of a < b, b < a are true and neither of a < c, c < a are true. This means that a and b are equivalent and a and c are equivalent, however clearly c < b so b and c are not equivalent, thus showing that equivalence isn't transitive. This is why your operator< is not suitable for Coord to be used as a key in a std::map.

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