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EDIT: I assure you that everything is correctly indented when I run this through python. I assume the problem has to do with how I call p._x and p._y but I'm not sure why?

This is a problem I am having crazy amounts of difficulty with. It just doesn't make sense. I have to submit this through a program checker, so it checks the code and makes sure its correct. If its not correct it gives out a useless error report.

Ok so this is what I want to do: I need to calculate the distance between two vectors(x,y).

This is the test case that the program will run:

foo = Point(1,2)
bar = Point(3,4)
foo.dist_to_point(bar) = 2.8...

This is the code I have:

import math
class Point:
    def __init__(self, x, y):
      self._x = x
      self._y = y


    def dist_to_point(self, p):
      a = self._x - p._x
      b = self._y - p._y
      c = math.sqrt(a**2+b**2)
      return c

and it doesn't work. The error it gives me is this "you are trying to index into a point object. They are not lists or tuples - for point object p use p._x and p._y to access the required variables.

Any ideas?

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dist_to_point has bad indentation, it's a Point method so it needs 4 spaces indentation –  RC. Sep 2 '13 at 5:23
    
Thats not the problem for in my program I assure you, I just made the mistake when trying to copy it into stackoverflow. –  Ghozt Sep 2 '13 at 5:24
1  
Either the program checker is wrong or your code is different. You aren't using any sort of indices in your code. –  Blender Sep 2 '13 at 5:28
    
This may be in the program checker. Without knowing how it's written it is nearly impossible to help you. –  Emil Vikström Sep 2 '13 at 5:29
    
probably your program checker is wrong, the code you posted works fine –  JoseP Sep 2 '13 at 5:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Python requires all of your indentation to be the same. I see you're using a mixture of tabs and spaces, so your code won't even compile correctly. Here is the same code you have above, just with all of the indentation being two spaces instead of a mixture of tabs and spaces (it compiles and works!):

import math
class Point:
  def __init__(self, x, y):
    self._x = x
    self._y = y

  def dist_to_point(self, p):
    a = self._x - p._x
    b = self._y - p._y
    c = math.sqrt(a**2+b**2)
    return c


foo = Point(1,2)
bar = Point(3,4)
print(foo.dist_to_point(bar))

Pick tabs or spaces - don't use both. :)

share|improve this answer
    
I assure you it is really indented correctly in IDLE, its just I copied and pasted it into stackoverflow and it messed up my indention. –  Ghozt Sep 2 '13 at 5:25
    
...or, if you don't want to make copy-paste mistakes etc, like demonstrated in unedited question, just use spaces, full stop... YMMV –  hyde Sep 2 '13 at 5:27
    
It does not work going through the program tester, which my question pertains to. –  Ghozt Sep 2 '13 at 5:27
    
Well, we need to know what kind of program tester you are using. The above code correctly runs in python. –  Sean Johnson Sep 2 '13 at 5:28
1  
@Ghozt: Using square brackets to access an item: foo[0] or bar[1]. Do you have any brackets in your source code (even in a comment)? –  Blender Sep 2 '13 at 5:31

Wild guesses:

  • Elsewhere, in code not shown, you are supposed to use a collection of points, but you use a single point.

  • You are supposed to implement indexed access to point coordinates.

You should review the assignment.

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