Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →
$(this).attr('id') == 'zipcode' && $this.value()!=(3, 4, 5)

What I tried to do here was call up the text input field with an id of "zipcode" and say something along the lines of "if value of zipcode is not 3, 4, or 5 then... etc etc..." I tried many combinations including || but nothing has worked. I'll be listing all the possible zip codes and would require the shortest possible way to do it.

Much appreciated.

Full code:

function validateStep(step){ if(step == fieldsetCount) return;

var error = 1;
var hasError = false;
$('#formElem').children(':nth-child('+ parseInt(step) +')').find(':input.req:not(button)').each(function(){
    var $this       = $(this);
    var valueLength = jQuery.trim($this.val()).length;
var emailPattern = /^[a-zA-Z0-9._-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9.-]+\.[a-zA-Z]{2,4}$/; 

if(valueLength == "" || $(this).attr('id') =='email' && !emailPattern.test($this.val()) || $(this).attr('id') == 'zipcode' && $this.value()!=(3, 4, 5))   

{
        hasError = true;
        $this.css('background-color','#FFEDEF');
    }
    else
        $this.css('background-color','#fff');

});
share|improve this question
1  
possible duplicate of How to shorten my conditional statements – Phil Sep 2 '13 at 5:54
up vote -1 down vote accepted
$(this).attr('id') == 'zipcode' && !/^(3|4|5)$/.test($(this).val())
share|improve this answer
1  
/^[3-5]$/ would be even shorter here. – Vince Sep 2 '13 at 5:53
    
Indeed it would :-) – David-SkyMesh Sep 2 '13 at 5:53
    
I think so far this is the one I'm able to understand.. Earlier I phrased a keyword wrong in my question. Not 3,4,5 IN zipcode, it should be if zipcode = 3,4 or 5. I've tried the other listed answers but some are just beyond my understanding :(. I get what your code is doing but how do I tweek it?...I really appreciate it. Thanks! – user2738207 Sep 2 '13 at 6:23
    
What exactly should it test for? If I've understood your re-wording, then this is already correct. The ^ and $ cause it to anchor the regexp to the begining and end of the string. That way zipcode must be entirely either '3' or '4' or '5' (rather than just containing those characters). – David-SkyMesh Sep 2 '13 at 6:27
    
It's odd.. It's accepting it if the field has more than 2 of the listed value example: 34a, 44b, a34 – user2738207 Sep 2 '13 at 6:34

One way to do this would be to use indexOf:

var values = [1,2,3,4];
var value = parseInt($(this).val());
if(values.indexOf(value) == -1) {
    //dostuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
parseInt(); ? – iConnor Sep 2 '13 at 5:53
    
Why parseInt around the indexOf call? – user2357112 Sep 2 '13 at 5:53
    
@user2357112 Sorry, it was supposed to be around the val call. – Asad Saeeduddin Sep 2 '13 at 5:54
1  
Why over complicate things ? [1, 2, 3].indexOf( parseInt(this.value) ) === -1 – iConnor Sep 2 '13 at 5:55
1  
@Pinocchio "this.value is nothing like $(this).val()" ... Seriously? val is a jQuery method for collections that exposes value for most input elements and the selected value for select boxes. What's the difference? – Asad Saeeduddin Sep 2 '13 at 6:00

This is a bit shorter:

$(this).attr('id') == 'zipcode' && $this.value() < 3 && $this.value() > 5

share|improve this answer
    
this only works if the numbers are 3,4,5. I believe OP was asking for variables – He Hui Sep 2 '13 at 5:56
//
//  like this
//
function isnoteqto( value /* ...params*/ ) {
    return Array.prototype.slice.call( arguments, 1 ).every( function ( arg ) { return value !== arg; } );
}
//
share|improve this answer

I always like to extend the String prototype. Here is an example.

String.prototype.isNot = function() {
    for( var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++ ) {
        if( this == arguments[i] ) return false;
    }
    return true;
};

Then you can do

var value = 'something';

if( value.isNot('value1', 'value2') ) // true

And

if( value.isNot('something') ) // false

If you don't like extending the String.prototype you can do this.

var isNot = function( value, args ) {
   for( var i = 0; i < args.length; i++ ) {
       if( value == args[i] ) return false;
   }
   return true;
}

And use like so.

var value = 'something';

if( isNot(value, ['value1', 'value2']) ) // true

And

if( isNot(value, ['something']) ) // false
share|improve this answer
    
Extending native types for a tiny bit of syntax sugar is bad ettiquette IMO. edit: just saw your alternative. – Asad Saeeduddin Sep 2 '13 at 6:10
1  
I like the syntactic sugar. for people that don't I have provided another option. I can also think of a lot more Worse things to be worrying about. – iConnor Sep 2 '13 at 6:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.