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I cannot, for the love of myself figure out what the logic is behind this C code.

Supposedly, the following should print out the binary representation of an unsigned char x, and we are only allowed to fill in the blanks.

void print_binary(unsigned char x) {
    int b = 128;

    while (__________________) {

        if (b <= x) {
            x -= b;
            printf("1");
        } else
            printf("0");

        ______________________;
    }
}

Of course I could game the program by simply ignoring the lines above. However I'm under the impression that this is not really the way to do things (it's more of a hack).

I mean really now, the first condition checks whether 128 is <= the char, but isn't an unsigned char, what, 255 bytes? So why is it only printing '1' in it.

Perhaps I'm missing something quite obvious (not really a c programmer) but the logic just doesn't sink into me this time.

Can anyone point me in the right direction? And if you can give me a clue without completely saying the answer, that would be heavenly.

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3  
The second blank is probably b /= 2; the first is presumably b != 0. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 2 '13 at 6:18
3  
I invite you to look to the list on the right/left of Related questions. and pick this one. Further, "but isn't an unsigned char, what, 255 bytes" ?? I dunno about your platform, but on mine an unsigned char is one byte. –  WhozCraig Sep 2 '13 at 6:18
2  
This question is more about maths than about C. –  Joni Sep 2 '13 at 6:21
    
@Joni My exact feeling - which is weird since this is supposed to be an "Are you familiar enough with C?" test. –  Secret Sep 2 '13 at 6:24
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3 Answers

void print_binary(unsigned char x) {
    int b = 128;

    while (b != 0) {

        if (b <= x) {
            x -= b;
            printf("1");
        } else
            printf("0");

        b = b >> 1;
    }
}

The binary representaion for b is 10000000. By doing b >> 1 and checking b <= x we can check each bit on x is 1 or 0.

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1  
did you miss a "b = "?? "b = b >> 1;" –  raj raj Sep 2 '13 at 6:38
    
@raj raj. yes, Thanks. was a typo. –  Thanushan Balakrishnan Sep 2 '13 at 6:40
    
he asked for a hint: "And if you can give me a clue without completely saying the answer", but you gave him the answer –  Claptrap Sep 2 '13 at 7:21
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You wanted only a clue: Value of the current bit is always bigger, than the combination of less significant bits after it. Thus code tries to test only the most significant '1'-bit on each iteration of loop.

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If we disregard the original code, the most intuitive way to do this would be:

void print_binary (uint8_t x) 
{
  for(uint8_t mask=0x80; mask!=0; mask>>=1)
  {
    if(x & mask)
    {
      printf("1");
    }
    else
    {
      printf("0");
    }
  }
  printf("\n");
}
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There are advantages to not including the newline in the output from the function. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 2 '13 at 6:30
    
@JonathanLeffler Without a specification of what the function should do, who can tell. –  Lundin Sep 2 '13 at 6:31
    
Do we really need an if else? What about this? for(int i=7; i>=0; i--) printf("%d", (x>>i)&1); –  raj raj Sep 2 '13 at 6:43
    
The original code was a form of specification; it does not include a newline at the end of the output, and for the sake of being generally useful, it should not include the newline. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 2 '13 at 13:55
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