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I am creating objects that will have properties in common based on user input and then passing the objects to a common method that will take appropriate action based on the object type. I've been able to sort of get this working using a visitor class but it is not quite what I want. I want to be able to determine the object type in the common method and then access the methods associated with that object. I am not sure if I am close and just missing something or if I just have a bad implementation... or both =). Here is my (complete) code:

package com.theory.bang.big;

public interface Particle
{
    public enum ParticleType {
        QUARK,
        LEPTON
}

int processParticle(Particle p);

}


package com.theory.bang.big;

import java.util.ArrayList;
public class Quark implements Particle
{
ArrayList<String> flavorList;

/**
 * Constructor for objects of class Quark
 */
public Quark() 
{
    flavorList = new ArrayList<String>();
    flavorList.add("up");
    flavorList.add("down");
    flavorList.add("charm");
    flavorList.add("strange");
    flavorList.add("top");
    flavorList.add("bottom");
}

public ArrayList<String> getFlavors()
{
    return flavorList;
}


@Override
public int processParticle(Particle p)
{
    System.out.println("In processParticle(Quark)");

    // Never called?

    return 0;
}

}



package com.theory.bang.big;

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class Lepton implements Particle
{
ArrayList<String> typeList;

/**
 * Constructor for objects of class Lepton
 */
public Lepton() 
{   
    typeList = new ArrayList<String>();
    typeList.add("electron");
    typeList.add("electron neutrino");
    typeList.add("muon");
    typeList.add("muon neutrino");
    typeList.add("tau");
    typeList.add("tau neutrino");
}

public ArrayList<String> getTypes()
{
    return typeList;
}

@Override
public int processParticle(Particle p)
{
    System.out.println("In processParticle(Lepton)");

    return 0;
}
}


package com.theory.bang.big;

import java.lang.reflect.*;

class ParticleVisitor
{
public void visit( Quark q )
{
    System.out.println("Quark:[" + q.getFlavors() + "]");
}

public void visit( Lepton l )
{
    System.out.println("Lepton:[" + l.getTypes() + "]");
}

public void visit( Object e ) throws Exception
{
    Method m = getClass().getMethod
     ( "visit", new Class[]{e.getClass()} );
    m.invoke( this, new Object[]{e} );
}
}


package com.theory.bang.big;

import java.io.File;

public class Accelerate implements Particle
{
/**
 * Constructor for objects of class Accelerate
 */
public Accelerate(Particle p)
{
    processParticle(p);
}

//@Override
public int processParticle(Particle p)
{
    try {

        ParticleVisitor pv = new ParticleVisitor();
        pv.visit(p);
    } catch (Exception x) {
        System.out.println(x);
    }

   return 0;
}
}


package com.theory.bang.big;

import java.io.File;
import java.util.Scanner;

public class Physics
{
public static void main(String[] args)
{
   boolean done = false;

   while (!done) {
       System.out.print("Enter the particle [Quark or Lepton]: ");
       Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);      
       String input = in.next();

       if (input.equals("Quark")) {
           System.out.println("Quark");
           Quark q = new Quark();
           new Accelerate(q);
        } else if (input.equals("Lepton")) {
            System.out.println("Lepton");
            Lepton l = new Lepton();
            new Accelerate(l);
        } else {
            done = true;
        }
    }

}
}

Currently I can print the Quark flavors and Lepton types via the visit methods but what I need is to be able to execute (to be implemented) getter/setters (e.g. getSpin(), setSpin(double s)) for the respective objects in Accelerate(). What am I missing? Or is there a better way to implement this?

Thank you very much for your time.

-Walter

share|improve this question
    
I haven't really understood what you were trying to do, but what you have there is not an implementation of the visitor pattern. The visitor pattern needs an accept(Visitor v) method in the common interface, overriddn by the implementations, and calling the appropriate visit() method with this as argument. –  JB Nizet Sep 2 '13 at 7:06
    
My code is based on what I believe is a modified visitor pattern using reflection. Here is the link (also see Listing 1): polyglotinc.com/reflection.html To clarify further (hopefully) what I would like to do is: once I am in Accelerate() I have either a Quark object or a Lepton object. I would like to identify the type of object and then run the appropriate methods on that object. For example if it is a Quark object I could run getFlavors() or if it was a Lepton object I could run getTypes(). I will be implementing additional getter/setter methods for each object type. –  screwed Sep 2 '13 at 7:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For your concrete example, you can throw away all that stuff and use overloading by parameter types:

public class Physics {
    public static void processParticle( Quark q ) {
        System.out.println("Quark:[" + q.getFlavors() + "]");
    }

    public static void processParticle( Lepton l ) {
        System.out.println("Lepton:[" + l.getTypes() + "]");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    boolean done = false;

    while (!done) {
       System.out.print("Enter the particle [Quark or Lepton]: ");
       Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);      
       String input = in.next();

       if (input.equals("Quark")) {
           System.out.println("Quark");
           Quark q = new Quark();
           processParticle(q);
        } else if (input.equals("Lepton")) {
           System.out.println("Lepton");
           Lepton l = new Lepton();
           processParticle(q);
       } else {
           done = true;
    }
}

If you want to call processParticle() where compiler does not know the exact type of the particle, use double dispatch pattern:

// add method processParticle
public interface Particle{
    ...

    void processParticle();

}

 class Quark implements Particle {
    void processParticle() {
        Physics.processParticle(this);
    }
 }

 class Lepton extends Particle {
    void processParticle() {
        Physics.processParticle(this);
    }
 }

 public class Physics {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (;;) {
           System.out.print("Enter the particle [Quark or Lepton]: ");
           Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);      
           String input = in.next();
           Particle p;
           if (input.equals("Quark")) {
               System.out.println("Quark");
               p = new Quark();
            } else if (input.equals("Lepton")) {
               System.out.println("Lepton");
               p = new Lepton();
           } else {
              break;
           }
           p.processParticle();
        }
    }
}

Then you can evolve to true visitor pattern, but reflection can and should be avoided here.

share|improve this answer
    
That has simplified things a bit. I removed the visitor/reflection code however my core problem remains. For example, if I wanted to take your example and put Accelerate() back in how would I do something like this: if (input.equals("Quark") p = new Quark(); new Accelerate(p); Accelerate(Particle p) { doStuffWithParticle(p); void doStuffWithParticle(Particle p) { if (p == Quark) { p.getFlavors(); } if (p == Lepton) { p.setSpin(...); } ... Thanks. Sorry about the formatting. –  screwed Sep 2 '13 at 9:14
    
create separate constructors Accelerate(Quark q) and Accelerate(Lepton l). Or, call p.processParticle() from general constructor. –  Alexei Kaigorodov Sep 2 '13 at 9:26

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