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Having several ForeignKeys in a ModelForm that I want to use in a form wizard with modelformset_factory (not 100% sure about the formset) I'm wondering how to limit the choices of the dropdown field for I need to do it dynamically. I wanted to try it by writing my own modelformset factory but here on stackoverflow I read about other approaches but unfortunatelly I don't understand them.

That's how far I came:

models.py

#...
class Attendee(models.Model):
    """Event specific attendee details."""
    # event is set by URL.
    event = models.ForeignKey(Event)
    attendee = models.ForeignKey(Person) # Contact details, should be limited to user
    accommodation = models.ForeignKey(Accommodation, blank=True) # *
    workshop = models.ForeignKey(Workshop, blank=True) # *
    volunteer = models.ForeignKey(Volunteer, blank=True) # *
    # *= should be limited to event but I think I will be able to handle that.
    #...

class AttendeeForm(forms.ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = Attendee

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
#    def __init__(self, user, *args, **kwargs): I tried this but I didn't get 
# it to work.
        super(AttendeeForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
#         self.fields['attendee'].queryset = Person.objects.filter(owner=user)
        self.fields['workshop'].required = True
        #...

# This is from http://stackoverflow.com/a/4858044/2704544 but I don't understand it. ##
def form_setup(**kwargs):
    def make_form(data, prefix=None, initial=None):
        form = (data, prefix, initial)
        for k, v in kwargs.items():
            if k == 'some_list':
                form.fields['some_list'].choices = v # What does that mean?
            ...
        return form
    return make_form
#######################################################################################

(link to source)

views.py

# This is from http://stackoverflow.com/a/623198/2704544 but I don't understand it. ###
class Callback(object):
    def __init__(self, field_name, aff):
        self._field_name = field_name
        self._aff = aff # What is this aff?
    def cb(self, field, **kwargs):
        nf = field.formfield(**kwargs)
        if field.name == self._field_name:  # this is 'options' field
            nf.queryset = ServiceOption.objects.filter(affiliate=self._aff)
        return nf
#######################################################################################

reg_wiz_forms = (
    ('attendees', modelformset_factory(Attendee, form=AttendeeForm, exclude='event', 
# formfield_callback=Callback('option', affiliate).cb Just copied. Why can you call 
# cb without arguments?
)),)
class RegWizard(SessionWizardView):
    def get_form_instance(self, step):
        instance = None

        if step == '0':
            instance = Attendees.objects.filter(owner__owner=self.request.user)
        #...

(link to source)

urls.py

#...
url(r'^register/$', views.RegWizard.as_view(views.reg_wiz_forms), name='register'),
#...

I also read about curry and other stuff and tried to override get_initkwargs and other methods of WizardView but I couldn't find any more docu or hints on that topic. Maybe someone can help me out.

Update

It works partly with curry now. Partly because it doesn't work with a manage function:

views.py

def manage_wizard(request, event):
    AttendeeFormSet = modelformset_factory(Attendee, form=AttendeeForm, exclude='event')
    AttendeeFormSet.form = staticmethod(curry(AttendeeForm, user=request.user))
    wiz = RegWizard
    wiz.event = event
    return wiz.as_view([('attendees', AttendeeFormSet)])

I get an AttributeError: "'function' object has no attribute 'base_fields'" This sounds like the same issue here.

But when I override WizardView's get_form_list and call it in url.py directly it works:

reg_wiz_forms = ('attendees', modelformset_factory(Attendee, form=AttendeeForm, exclude='event'))

class RegWizard(SessionWizardView):
    def get_form_list(self):
        self.form_list['attendees'].form = staticmethod(curry(AttendeeForm, user=self.request.user))
        return super(RegWizard, self).get_form_list()

Now I'm wondering if there is a solution without overriding the method.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You simply want your foreign key queryset for the attendee attribute on your Model to be a filtered one on your ModelForm. You are on the right lines here:

self.fields['attendee'].queryset = Person.objects.filter(owner=user)

This is assuming an attribute 'owner' exists on the Person class.

This won't work however, as where or what is your user arg? One solution is to curry the forms init method, as you mention, to include the correct user object:

    form = staticmethod(curry(AttendeeForm, user=<the-user-obj>))

Now you pop your user arg from the kwargs in your init method:

user = kwargs.pop('user')

Now your filtered queryset will only display the Person you filtered for.

def __init__(self, user, *args, **kwargs): I tried this but I didn't get 
it to work.

The line above won't work for a number of reasons, the primary being that it will never be called from anywhere, you are making a new function there, not overriding an existing one, which is what we are doing overring the init method.

Just some possibly helpful advice on design - You've got many threads here all providing many different ideas, complicating things a lot. Try to filter your problem to basic concepts. Here, it's a presentation of data issue, so think about starting in the Form, that's what it's there for. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Now I could put it together. Then I tried to make a manage_wizard function to get the request and the event slug and create the ModelFormSets but think I have exactly the same problem as described here. Do you have any suggestion not to override WizardView's get_form_list (which works)? – yofee Sep 3 '13 at 8:42
    
If you have another issue, I'd suggest posting your offending code in a new SO question so we can all take a look, this one's been answered. – professorDante Sep 3 '13 at 16:26
    
Actually it's the same question. The funny thing is that I tried it first in the unconventional way (overriding). But I didn't like that so I tried to change it what failed. See update above for more details. Would you still post a new question? If, I could still do it but it had a similar title. I could also unaccept your answer. – yofee Sep 3 '13 at 18:10
    
I'd say the question has been answered, based on your title of the question 'how to filter Foreign Keys....'. My answer answers that. Your override method is absolutely valid, what makes you think overriding is 'unconventional'? It's 100% fine. – professorDante Sep 3 '13 at 18:22
    
ok. Thanks for your patience :) Just for understanding: You wrote def __init__(self, user, *args, **kwargs): won't work. I have this idea from b-list. Did it work with Django 1.0 but not anymore? – yofee Sep 4 '13 at 8:49

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