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Does anyone know the full list of characters that can be used within a GET without being encoded? At the moment I am using A-Z a-z and 0-9... but I am looking to find out the full list.

I am also interested into if there is a specification released for the up coming addition of Chinese, Arabic url's (as obviously that will have a big impact on my question)

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6 Answers 6

up vote 58 down vote accepted

From RFC 1738 specification:

Thus, only alphanumerics, the special characters "$-_.+!*'(),", and reserved characters used for their reserved purposes may be used unencoded within a URL.

EDIT: As @Jukka K. Korpela correctly points out, this RFC was updated by RFC 3986. This has expanded and clarified the characters valid for host, unfortunately it's not easily copied and pasted, but I'll do my best.

In first matched order:

host        = IP-literal / IPv4address / reg-name

IP-literal  = "[" ( IPv6address / IPvFuture  ) "]"

IPvFuture   = "v" 1*HEXDIG "." 1*( unreserved / sub-delims / ":" )

IPv6address =         6( h16 ":" ) ls32
                  /                       "::" 5( h16 ":" ) ls32
                  / [               h16 ] "::" 4( h16 ":" ) ls32
                  / [ *1( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::" 3( h16 ":" ) ls32
                  / [ *2( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::" 2( h16 ":" ) ls32
                  / [ *3( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::"    h16 ":"   ls32
                  / [ *4( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::"              ls32
                  / [ *5( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::"              h16
                  / [ *6( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::"

ls32        = ( h16 ":" h16 ) / IPv4address
                  ; least-significant 32 bits of address

h16         = 1*4HEXDIG 
               ; 16 bits of address represented in hexadecimal

IPv4address = dec-octet "." dec-octet "." dec-octet "." dec-octet

dec-octet   = DIGIT                 ; 0-9
              / %x31-39 DIGIT         ; 10-99
              / "1" 2DIGIT            ; 100-199
              / "2" %x30-34 DIGIT     ; 200-249
              / "25" %x30-35          ; 250-255

reg-name    = *( unreserved / pct-encoded / sub-delims )

unreserved  = ALPHA / DIGIT / "-" / "." / "_" / "~"     <---This seems like a practical shortcut, most closely resembling original answer

reserved    = gen-delims / sub-delims

gen-delims  = ":" / "/" / "?" / "#" / "[" / "]" / "@"

sub-delims  = "!" / "$" / "&" / "'" / "(" / ")"
              / "*" / "+" / "," / ";" / "="

pct-encoded = "%" HEXDIG HEXDIG
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How about slash? –  Tim Bezhashvyly Jun 20 '12 at 14:22
2  
@Tim slash is a reserved character, therefore, if it is being used for its reserved purpose (delineating paths, protocol delineation...), then it does not need escaping. Otherwise, it does. –  Myles Jul 6 '12 at 22:26
2  
Generic syntax rules of RFC 1738 were obsoleted in 1998. –  Jukka K. Korpela Mar 8 '13 at 7:17
1  
@JukkaK.Korpela Do you have the correct RFC to refer to then so this answer can be improved? –  Myles Mar 8 '13 at 14:56
3  
@Myles, STD 66 (= RFC 3986) is mentioned in other answers. Whether the content of answers is correct is a different issue; I don’t think any of the answers correctly describes the full list. –  Jukka K. Korpela Mar 8 '13 at 15:05

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percent-encoding#Types_of_URI_characters

says these are RFC 3986 unreserved characters (sec. 2.3) as well as reserved characters (sec 2.2) if they need to retain their special meaning.

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1  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  j.a.estevan May 15 at 18:40

From here

Thus, only alphanumerics, the special characters "$-.+!'(),", and reserved characters used for their reserved purposes may be used unencoded within a URL.

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These are listed in RFC3986. See the Collected ABNF for URI to see what is allowed where and the regex for parsing/validation.

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The full list of the 66 unreserved characters is in RFC3986, here: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-2.3

This is any character in the following set:

[A-Za-z0-9_.-~]
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You can use those reserved too. –  Qwerty Mar 21 '13 at 11:53

The upcoming change is for chinese, arabic domain names not URIs. The internationalised URIs are called IRIs and are defined in RFC 3987. However, having said that I'd recommend not doing this yourself but relying on an existing, tested library since there are lots of choices of URI encoding/decoding and what are considered safe by specification, versus what are safe by actual use (browsers).

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