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Code:

union foo
{
    char c;
    int i;
};

void func(void * src)
{
    union foo dest;
    memcpy(&dest, src, sizeof(union foo));   //here
}

If I call func() like this:

int main()
{
    char c;
    int i;
    func(&c);
    func(&i);
    return 0;
}

In the call func(&c), the size of c is less than sizeof(union foo), which may be dangerous, right?

Is the line with memcpy correct? And if not, how to fix it?

What I want is a safe call to memcpy that copy a void * pointer to a union.


A little background: this is extracted from a very complicated function, and the signature of func() including the void * parameter is out of my control. Of course the example does nothing useful, that's because I removed all the code that isn't relevant to provide an example with minimum code.

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4  
this code doesn't make sense. what do you want to do? –  Karoly Horvath Sep 2 '13 at 7:58
2  
The memcpy is NOT fine. Undefined behavior is not restricted to only writing in memory regions you don't own. Accessing them at all is undefined behavior. That it may not crash (and on some platforms it will) makes no difference. –  WhozCraig Sep 2 '13 at 8:07
    
@KarolyHorvath Did you mean the code example did nothing useful? If that's the case, that's because I only extracted the part that I have doubts with. I added a little background, I don't know if that's enough. –  Yu Hao Sep 2 '13 at 8:09
    
why not cast the void pointer to union foo and assign the field of c instead of memcpy –  MYMNeo Sep 2 '13 at 8:14
    
@MYMNeo This would solve the example I provided, but the real code is much more complicated, e.g, the elements of the union are struct. A version using memcpy is preferred. –  Yu Hao Sep 2 '13 at 8:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is the line with memcpy correct? And if not, how to fix it?

you should pass the size of memory pointed by void pointer so you can know src has this much size so you just need to copy this much of data...

Further more to be safe you should calculate the size of destination and based on that you should pass size so illegal access in reading and writing both can be avoided.

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@MvG oh thanks...after almost 2 years i understand this things. –  Mr.32 Sep 2 '13 at 8:29
    
"... so you can know dest has this much size so you just need to copy this much of data ...": Is this a typo? You are referring to src as dest, aren't you? As per your 1st sentence, this: "... pass the size of destination ..." should read: "... pass the size of source ...", shouldn't it? –  alk Sep 2 '13 at 8:58
    
This is incorrect. The size of the destination is hardcoded in the function which provides the destination, and so always correct. The possible concern is with assuming the size of the source leading to a theoretically illegal access. –  Chris Stratton Aug 11 '14 at 15:57
    
@alk yes that was typo thanks i have corrected my answer. –  Mr.32 Aug 12 '14 at 5:44
    
@ChrisStratton Yes you are correct and i have updated my answer. Thanks for suggestion. –  Mr.32 Aug 12 '14 at 5:44

In the call func(&c), the size of c is less than sizeof(union foo), which may be dangerous, right?

Right, this will lead to undefined behaviour. dest will likely contain some bytes from memory areas surrounding c, and which these are depends on the internal workings of the compiler. Of course, as long as you only access dest.c, that shouldn't cause any problems in most cases.

But let me be more specific. According to the C standard, writing dest.c but reading dest.i will always yield undefined behaviour. But most compilers on most platforms will have some well-defined behaviour for those cases as well. So often writing dest.c but reading dest.i makes sense despite what the standard says. In this case, however, reading from dest.i will still be affected by unknown surrounding variables, so it is undefined not only from the standards point of view, but also in a very practical sense.

There also is a rare scenario you should consider: c might be located at the very end of allocated memory pages. (This refers to memory pages allocated from the operating system and eventually the memory management unit (MMU) hardware, not to the block-wise user space allocation done by malloc and friends.) In this case, reading more than that single byte might cause access to unmapped memory, and hence cause a severe error, most likely a program crash. Given the location of your c as an automatic variable in main, this seems unlikely, but I take it that this code snippet is only an example.

Is the line with memcpy correct? And if not, how to fix it?

Depends on what you want to do. As it stands, the code doesn't make too much sense, so I don't know what correct reasonable application you might have in mind. Perhaps you should pass the sizeof the src object to func.

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By memory mapping unit, do you mean Memory Management Unit (MMU) ? –  Martin Aug 11 '14 at 7:47
    
@Martin: Yes, that's what I meant. Will edit to fix this. –  MvG Aug 11 '14 at 15:51

The memcpy is fine. By passing the address of the smallest member of the union, you will end with garbage in the larger member. A way to avoid the garbage-bit is to by default make all calls to func - which I assume you do control - use only pointers to the larger member - this can be achieved by setting the larger member to the smaller one: i = c and then call func(&i).

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The memcpy() isn't fine, because what's being passed to copy from isn't a union. –  This isn't my real name Sep 2 '13 at 18:29
    
@ElchononEdelson: mem = memory - does not require the content pointed-to to be anything ... –  slashmais Sep 3 '13 at 10:34
1  
Certainly it does. If you pass a pointer to a one-byte object and tell memcpy() to pull four bytes out of that pointer, that's Undefined. –  This isn't my real name Sep 3 '13 at 14:18
    
@ElchononEdelson: that definitely is PIBCAK :) –  slashmais Sep 3 '13 at 14:32

func itself is ok.

The problems lies in whether the caller really makes sure that the memory referenced when calling func() is at least sizeof(union foo).

If the latter is always the case, everything is fine. It is not then case for the two calls to func() in the OP's example.

If the memory referenced when calling func() is less then sizeof(union foo) then memcpy() provokes undefined behaviour.

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Actually, no, it isn't okay. It assumes things about the readability of the next 3 bytes, which the caller doesn't guarantee. –  Chris Stratton Aug 11 '14 at 16:02
    
Didn't I wrote this? @ChrisStratton (And why do you refer to "three" bytes?) –  alk Aug 11 '14 at 16:07

Since you know what and what size to copy, why not give a more explicit function, let the function know how to copy the right size of memory which void pointer pointed to.

union foo
{
    char c;
    int i;
};

void func(void * src, const char * type)
{
    union foo dest;

    if(strcmp(type, "char") == 0){
      memcpy(&dest, src, 1);
    }else if(...){

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Arg! Don't use strings for such things! If you have to pass type identification information, use an enum. But all that is needed here is the size of the type, so that's what I'd suggest you pass. –  MvG Sep 2 '13 at 10:05
    
I agree with you, I just want to give a example, strings comparison is not very good. –  MYMNeo Sep 2 '13 at 10:30

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