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I am developing a Java based application and I decided to use machine learning algorithms implemented in Mahout library. My application will run on single machine, without Hadoop.

I would like to ask, if single node Mahout has also overhead, like distributed one? I read in a book Mahout in action, than multiple cluster Mahout has some overhead (initializing, transfering data, etc.). But if we use Mahout algorithms without MapReduce paradigm, there should be no overhead, right?

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Some of the algorithms have non-distributed versions (meaning no hadoop). You should use those if available for your needs. –  Julian Ortega Sep 3 '13 at 9:23

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It does not make a difference whether you run it in a single machine or a 1000-node cluster. Hadoop serializes all the intermediate data (MAP's key-value output), and persist it on the disk. In the reduce phase, it loads the key-value pairs back into the memory. Therefore, it has huge processing and disk-access overheads.

Basically, if you have few machines (e.g. <7 machines), hadoop is possibly not a good choice, specially for speedup analysis. In this case, you may just use the small cluster to check your code's logic before deploying it on a larger environment.

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Are you sure about that? Because Im asking about algorithms which don't use hadoop. These group of algorithms is appropriate for middle size data (and I think that MapReduce is not used, but Im not sure). Do they also use serialization? –  HIP_HOP Sep 13 '13 at 11:54
    
@HIP_HOP Well, Mahout is created to be run on top of Hadoop, using map-reduce paradigm. I don't think they have implemented a serial version without map-reduce. –  Ali Sep 13 '13 at 18:45
    
However, if you want to use scalable machine learning tools for single machine or limited number of machines (not fully scalable versions), you may try graphlab or spark –  Ali Sep 13 '13 at 18:58

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