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Consider a typical enumeration type in a C-like language like this:

enum foo {
    FOO_A,
    FOO_B,
    FOO_C,
    /* ... */
    FOO_N
};

There are switch statement over values of type enum foo, possibly not handling certain enumeration values:

enum foo bar;
/* ... */
switch (bar) {
case FOO_A: /* ... */
case FOO_B: /* ... */
case FOO_D: /* ... */
case FOO_L: /* ... */
default: /* ... */
}

Now, for a sufficiently high amount of enumeration values handled, the compiler will to implement the switch statement using a jump table with size (<highest handled value> - <lowest handled value> + 1) * sizeof(void*).

Consider I have multiple such switch statements that are known to use jump tables, for each one is known which values are being handled and which values aren't. How can I reorder the values in enum foo in a way, that the total size of all jump tables generated is minimal?

Example

Here is a slightly simplified example which assumes that the compiler generates jump tables for all switch statements. This is the enumeration:

enum example {
    EX_A,
    EX_B,
    EX_C,
    EX_D
};

And these are the two switch-statements:

enum example a, b;

switch (a) {
case EX_A: /* ... */
case EX_C: /* ... */
default: /* ... */
}

switch (b) {
case EX_B: /* ... */
case EX_D: /* ... */
default: /* ... */
}

For this example, the compiler would generate two jump tables with three entries each (in the first case from EX_A to EX_C, in the second case from EX_B to EX_D), amounting to a total of 6 machine words used for jump tables. If I did reorder the enumeration like this:

enum example {
    EX_A,
    EX_C,
    EX_B,
    EX_D
};

I would only need 4 data words for the jump tables.

share|improve this question
    
A super-tiny-minute-micro-optimization if ever I've seen one. This just seems like an optimization problem of minimizing, for your example, max(EX_A, EX_C) - min(EX_A, EX_C) and max(EX_B, EX_D) - min(EX_B, EX_D) (you might be able to simply add them, or do something more complex) (so you can probably simplify it to solving this problem). –  Dukeling Sep 2 '13 at 13:59
    
@Dukeling Thanks for clarifying what I am asking. Do you have any idea how I can solve this problem? –  FUZxxl Sep 2 '13 at 14:03
    
Oh and all must be unique. No, I don't really know the best way to solve this. My first attempt would probably be hill climbing, though you may be able use Integer Programming or model it as a Constraint Satisfaction problem. If we're only talking about up to like a dozen variables, brute force should be viable. –  Dukeling Sep 2 '13 at 14:11
    
@Dokeling The actual application is a handwritten parser where each enumeration value is one token type. (There are maybe 50 of those). There are lots of switch statements though. I recognize that this optimization is minor and probably negligible, I am just interested in how to actually do it, as I could not figure out how. Brute force is not an option, as there are 50! ways of arranging that enumeration. –  FUZxxl Sep 2 '13 at 14:19
1  
@Steven Stewart-Gallus They typically use a two-dimensional array of size <i>O(n*m)</i> (n: number of enumeration values; m: number of states) to store the state transition table and one switch over all production rules. –  FUZxxl Sep 2 '13 at 19:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This problem is NP-hard, because it generalizes the minimum linear arrangement problem (MinLA) from graphs to hypergraphs, and MinLA is NP-hard (Garey--Johnson--Stockmeyer 1976).

Some research has been done on solving MinLA, both exactly and approximately. There's a Theta(2^n m)-time dynamic program (Koren--Harel 2002) that looks generalizable. There's a lot of work on linear programming relaxations, both to obtain guaranteed approximations and for use in branch-and-bound. Unfortunately, these relaxations all seem to be rather too large for direct consumption by a solver. Probably someone's tried constraint programming, but my cursory searches turned up nothing. There are many heuristics, including the following cute idea due to Juvan and Mohar (1992): sort the labels according the second eigenvector of the Laplacian.

With only 50 labels, I wouldn't be surprised if a provably optimal arrangement could be found, but I would be surprised if it didn't take several rounds of novel algorithm design, implementation, and experiments on the instance(s) of interest. If you want to learn some of the techniques involved, I would recommend Pascal van Hentenryck's Discrete Optimization course on Coursera (I took an earlier version from when he was affiliated with Brown University).

share|improve this answer
    
I am not so sure that it's a generalization of minLA problem. The cost function to minimize is not exactly the same. –  jbaylina Sep 4 '13 at 14:31
    
@jbaylina You're right; the objectives of corresponding solutions differ by a constant that depends only on the instance. –  David Eisenstat Sep 4 '13 at 16:22

One solution (there likely is a faster one). Is by doing partial brute force.

If you treat each switch as a set, the intersection of all sets (i.e. switches) could be bunched first.

Having the following enum:

enum example {
    EX_A,
    EX_B,
    EX_C,
    EX_D,
    EX_E
};

And these two switch statements:

enum example a, b;

switch (a) {
case EX_A: /* ... */
case EX_C: /* ... */
case EX_E: /* ... */
default: /* ... */
}

switch (b) {
case EX_B: /* ... */
case EX_D: /* ... */
case EX_E: /* ... */
default: /* ... */
}

The intersection is:

{ EX_E }

and the remaining elements are:

{ EX_A, EX_B, EX_C, EX_D }

So you can put the intersection first, and go through all permutations of the rest and generate all the jump tables and see which one is the smaller one. This is n! (in this example you would have to look at 4! = 24 configurations).

share|improve this answer
    
Is it guaranteed that placing the intersection set in the beginning will find an optimal solution? –  FUZxxl Sep 2 '13 at 18:41
    
It's quite easy to find cases where putting the intersection in the front will find you a suboptimal solution. Consider elements { A, B, C } and switches { A, B } and { A, C }. Putting A in the front yields switching tables of sizes 2 and 3, which is worse than the optimal solution { B, A, C } with tables of size 2 and 2. Your approach does not work. –  FUZxxl Sep 2 '13 at 19:40
    
I think I misunderstood the problem then. –  juancn Oct 8 '13 at 18:07

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