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I'm reviewing my intern's code, and I stumbled upon something like this :

//k* are defined constants
if ($a == 0 & $b >= k0) $a = 1;
if ($a == 1 & $b >= k1) $a = 2;
if ($a == 2 & $b >= k2) $a = 3;

I thought he made a mistake, confusing & and && (I excepted a logical AND)

But, in fact, his code works as expected, and I can't understand why. In my mind, >= has precedence on ==, which also has precedence on & (reference).

So, I tested (1 == 0 & 1 >= 0) and it output 0. I expected 1, cause in my mind, it was like:

  • 1 >= 0 returns true,
  • Then 1 == 0 gives false,
  • So the expression is now (false & true), which I thought equal to (0 & 1)
  • Which equals 1...
  • So his & is acting like a ||.

Where am I wrong??

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@MarkBaker He said that. He's trying to understand why the mistyped code seemed to work. –  Barmar Sep 2 '13 at 12:22
    
@MarkBaker That's what I thought too, but it works like this. –  Bigood Sep 2 '13 at 12:23
    
0 & 1 === 0! the bitwise & returns the bits that are set in both operands. If one of the operands is 0, the end result will be 0 –  Elias Van Ootegem Sep 2 '13 at 12:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In PHP, a bitwise AND & on two booleans will convert them to integers (i.e. one or zero) and perform the AND. When the result of this operation is evaluated as a boolean, the result actually equates to the same functionality as a logical AND &&.

0 & 1 // 0, false
1 & 0 // 0, false
1 & 1 // 1, true
0 & 0 // 0, false

Proof

The intern will have mistaken the two operators, because there is no good reason to do this - you lose short-circuit evaluation and you add a few unnecessary type casts.

But it does actually work in the same way as a logical AND in this scenario.

In theory, your precedence argument is correct, but it only applies when there's ambiguity:

$foo = $b >= k1;
if ($a == 1 & $foo) $a = 2;

This could produce a different result from the one you intended, and you should write:

$foo = $b >= k1;
if (($a == 1) & $foo) $a = 2;
// or
if ($a == (1 & $foo)) $a = 2;

...depending on what you wanted.

But since you can't do:

$foo = 0 & $b;
if ($a == $foo >= k1) $a = 2;

...the code show can only be interpreted one way so it would be "safe", even if it's not exactly what you intended.

However, there's still very little danger unless you start mixing logical and bitwise operators - precedence-wise, the two types of operator are right next to each other, so something like:

if ($foo & $bar && $baz | $qux) // ...

...is in serious danger of doing something unexpected.

It's also worth noting that actually & is fairly reliable (it should still give the expected result, it's just inefficient and it won't short-circuit) - it's | that might start doing odd things.

However, you would obviously never do this anyway, you would use braces, because this version is quite opaque readability-wise.

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But on 4 bits, 0000 & 0001 = 0001, right? So on 1 bit, why wouldn't it be = 1? Is php really applying a different operation? –  Bigood Sep 2 '13 at 12:30
    
@Bigood I suspect you are mistaking the bitwise & and bitwise | - 0000 & 0001 == 0000 - it's the bits that are set on both operands that are present in the output value. The number of bits isn't relevant, it's applied from the lsb to the msb, any missing bits on either side are assumed to be zero (actually what would happen is a cast to the larger type, but in PHP all ints are just system long anyway) –  DaveRandom Sep 2 '13 at 12:31
    
I'm ashamed I did. Sorry! My intern rocked me. –  Bigood Sep 2 '13 at 12:32
    
@Bigood It's actually surprisingly easily done, I have found. Look at it this way: it could be worse, it could be VB :-) –  DaveRandom Sep 2 '13 at 12:34
1  
Your last sentence always returns true :) –  Bigood Sep 2 '13 at 12:38

Your mistake is here:

  • So the expression is now (false & true), which I thought equal to (0 & 1)
  • Which equals 1...

0 & 1 actually equals 0.

Boolean algebra is isomorphic to bitwise operators, that's the basis of binary computers.

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(0 & 1) is 0

The & operator works the same for logical values true and false as &&, except that it doesn't short-circuit i.e. omit evaluating the second expression when possible.

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It's perfectly simple. As you know the bitwise & returns the bits that are "on" in both operands:

0011
0010
----- &
0010

The bitwise | will set all bits that are set in either one (or both) of the operands:

0011
0010
----- |
0011

In your case, true and false are coerced to ints (0 and 1), which yields

0001
0000
----- &
0000

It's That simple

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed. Shame on me –  Bigood Sep 2 '13 at 12:35
    
@Bigood: No need :P... you overcomplicated it, because you've gotten used to the many quirks PHP has (call it experience with the ternary operator, or something...). You'll rock him right back some day :) –  Elias Van Ootegem Sep 2 '13 at 12:36
1  
Oh yes I will... :) I'll teach him parenthesis next time –  Bigood Sep 2 '13 at 12:40
    
@Bigood: nice place to start, then let him have some fun with reference debugging, to understand why writing code as clever as possible is actually a bad idea –  Elias Van Ootegem Sep 2 '13 at 12:51

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