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I need to use j as a counter and increment it at the same time the i increments. This code just keep on giving me random number for j.

    int i, j;   // counters
    for (i=0, j=1; i<=LENGTH; i++, j++)
    {
        printf("Player %i "\n", j);
        printf("Name:\t");
        fgets(name[i], MAXLENGTH, stdin);
        ...
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2  
Additionally, this code definitely looks like it should work. –  Jon Sep 2 '13 at 13:37
2  
@Bathsheba: Where did you get that idea from? –  Jon Sep 2 '13 at 13:45
1  
@Bathsheba: huh? i = 0, j = 1 is perfectly valid. –  Nik Bougalis Sep 2 '13 at 13:47
2  
@Bathsheba: I think you're wrong: for (i = 0, j = 1, k = 2; i < 10; i++, j++, k++) does exactly what one might expect. –  Paul R Sep 2 '13 at 13:48
1  
@Everyone! [My previous comment (now removed) implied you can't initialise more than one variable in a for loop using comma.] Yes indeed I am incorrect but I'll leave this here otherwise nothing else here will make sense. It's declaration together with definition that you can't do with two variables in a for loop using comma. Apologies. –  Bathsheba Sep 2 '13 at 13:51

3 Answers 3

printf("Player %i "\n", j); 

Statement consists of two double quotes.

printf("Player %i \n", j);  

or

printf("Player %d \n", j);   

try this code:

#define LENGTH 10
#include<stdio.h>
main()
{
    int i, j;//counters
    for (i=0, j=1; i<=LENGTH; i++, j++)
    {
        printf("Player j=%i  i=%d \n", j,i);
    }
}
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What about

  int i;//counter
  for (i=0; i<=LENGTH; i++)
  {
      printf("Player %i \n", i + 1);
      printf("Name:\t");
      fgets(name[i], MAXLENGTH, stdin);
  ...
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Agreed, though you missed the double quotes before the newline in the first printf call. The real question is how did it compile with that going on? ;-) –  Chrono Kitsune Sep 2 '13 at 13:45
    
The real question is : is is really necessary to compile a code like that? :p –  Pol0nium Sep 2 '13 at 13:57
    
I hope not, else every C compiler I have worked with gets it wrong by indicating an error. ^_^ –  Chrono Kitsune Sep 2 '13 at 13:59
1  
Well, as the question was about i and j, I didn't feel the need to compile a simple printf ;) –  Pol0nium Sep 2 '13 at 14:01

You don't say what name is, but if it is simply a string, like:

char name[MAXLENGTH];

then fgets will write into the name string starting at the ith element. It is possible you are writing past the end of the name string. If name is defined locally just before your loop, then you could overwriting both i and j with "random" data (i.e. you are performing the namesake of this site).

If this is the case, then you should instead call fgets as follows:

fgets(name, MAXLENGTH, stdin);
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