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I'm trying to figure out the best way to get everything before the - character in a string. Some example strings are below. The length of the string before - varies and can be any length

223232-1.jpg
443-2.jpg
34443553-5.jpg

so I need the value that's from the start index of 0 to right before -. So the substrings would turn out to be 223232, 443, and 34443553

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5 Answers 5

up vote 37 down vote accepted
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string s = "223232-1.jpg";
        Console.WriteLine(sep(s));
        s = "443-2.jpg";
        Console.WriteLine(sep(s));
        s = "34443553-5.jpg";
        Console.WriteLine(sep(s));

    Console.ReadKey();
    }

    public static string sep(string s)
    {
        int l = s.IndexOf("-");
        if (l >0)
        {
            return s.Substring(0, l);
        }
        return "";

    }
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These all error when "s" doesn't have the hyphen. –  No Refunds No Returns Dec 7 '09 at 2:51
2  
Please do them a favor and add error checking as well assuming he plans to make a function out of this :) –  Josh Dec 7 '09 at 2:51
    
Thanks I was close to this, but was curious if anyone had a different way to do it other than this combo. But yes this works great and is still pretty short. –  MSSucks Dec 7 '09 at 2:55
8  
If you wanted a one-liner without losing proper "not found" checking then you could do something like this: string result = source.Substring(0, Math.Max(source.IndexOf('-'), 0)) –  LukeH Dec 7 '09 at 9:58
2  
Instead of s.Substring(0, n) one can use s.Remove(n) when it is known (like here) that the length of the string s strictly exceeds n. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 27 '14 at 12:45

Use the split function.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string s = "223232-1.jpg";
    Console.WriteLine(s.Split('-')[0]);
    s = "443-2.jpg";
    Console.WriteLine(s.Split('-')[0]);
    s = "34443553-5.jpg";
    Console.WriteLine(s.Split('-')[0]);

Console.ReadKey();
}

If your string doesn't have a - then you'll get the whole string.

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3  
And if you have more than one hyphen, you get multiple elements in your array. –  James Dunne Nov 12 '12 at 15:48
1  
Indeed, James, so this would only be a solution if you expected only a single hyphen. I suppose you could use Linq methods like skip and aggregate to get what you wanted, but then you've got more code than the methods that have been proposed already. It all depends on how much you know about the incoming data. –  Dominic Cronin Nov 12 '12 at 19:50
    
And a few years on, I have just realised that I was rather too quick to concede James's point. The question asks how to find the string before a certain character. Further instances of that character are thus irrelevant, and taking [0] would "just work". Of course, it still depends on how much we trust the incoming data. What if there's no '-' at all? –  Dominic Cronin May 26 at 11:43
    
I think @JamesDunne point was that by splitting into an array, you're creating a bunch of unnecessary strings - unnecessary garbage. –  crush Jun 25 at 14:28
String str = "223232-1.jpg"
int index = str.IndexOf('-');
if(index > 0) {
    return str.Substring(0, index)
}
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This answer is way better than the other top answers in my opinion. –  VoidKing Jul 1 at 20:05

One way to do this is to use String.Substring together with String.IndexOf:

int index = str.IndexOf('-');
string sub;
if (index >= 0)
{
    sub = str.Substring(0, index);
}
else
{
    sub = ... // handle strings without the dash
}

Starting at position 0, return all text up to, but not including, the dash.

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if index <= 0 you should just return string.empty. –  No Refunds No Returns Dec 7 '09 at 2:54
2  
@NRNR: if you say so. The OP knows the business requirements, not you or I. –  Michael Petrotta Dec 7 '09 at 2:55

Things have moved on a bit since this thread started.

Now, you could use

string.Concat(s.TakeWhile((c) => c != '-'));
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How does this compare performance wise to the obvious IndexOf and Substring combination? I assume it is appending each character to a StringBuilder, and then producing a string at the end. There's also a couple of function calls mixed in. Would've been nice if Substring could simply take -1 as a "length" argument meaning "end of string". –  crush Jun 25 at 14:23
    
It's worse for efficiency. As you say, it uses a string builder, and having inspected the code appears to call ToString on each character. It is clearer if you're looking for more than one character, as you could rewrite the lambda easily. –  Wieser Software Ltd Jun 27 at 6:15

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