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Number n = 10; 
int i = 10;
System.out.println(n == i);

Based on "You CAN box then widen". Why the above code gives a compile time error? My guess is that if i will be first boxed to Integer and widened to Number the result will always be false. There are any specification referring to == operator when comparing a primitive with an object? Will always try to perform unboxing and the if necessarily will widen?

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1  
than or then? –  Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 2 '13 at 15:07
1  
What compile-time error? –  chrylis Sep 2 '13 at 15:07
    
Works fine. Proof: ideone.com/pvxPOt –  jlordo Sep 2 '13 at 15:09
    
@jlordo. Surprisingly, doesn't work on my Machine. –  Rohit Jain Sep 2 '13 at 15:11
    
Maybe it depends on the Java version. Can you post which version you use and whether it compiles for you? –  Aaron Digulla Sep 2 '13 at 15:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Per the JLS, == comparisons between a boxed and an unboxed value result in an unboxing conversion, not the other way around (or else you'd be using reference equality, not value equality). The compiler can't unbox a plain Number; Number itself isn't "convertible to a numeric type."

The Java 7 compiler appears to be being clever. The assembly output for this version and for the version in which the comparison is moved into a private method completely ignore the declared type Number, and everything works properly. Make that method public, and the behavior is as specified: The conversion isn't one of the listed types for which unboxing will occur, and the compiler boxes 10 to an Integer and compares by reference, meaning that if you try using Integer.valueOf(10), you'll get true for the range -128..127, and if you use anything else (another width, new Integer(10)), you'll get false.

Output from your code (note that Number appears nowhere, and that you're getting comparison based on reference equality in line 18; try using L or casting to short):

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0: bipush        10
   2: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/Integer.valueOf:(I)Ljava/lang/Integer;
   5: astore_1      
   6: bipush        10
   8: istore_2      
   9: getstatic     #3                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
  12: aload_1       
  13: bipush        10
  15: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/Integer.valueOf:(I)Ljava/lang/Integer;
  18: if_acmpne     25
  21: iconst_1      
  22: goto          26
  25: iconst_0      
  26: invokevirtual #4                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Z)V
  29: return

Version that prevents optimization:

public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Number n = new Integer(10);
        compare(n);
    }

    public static void compare(Number n)
    {
        int i=10;
        System.out.println(n == 10);
    }
}

Assembly; note that you're still getting a reference comparison in line 12:

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0: new           #2                  // class java/lang/Integer
   3: dup           
   4: bipush        10
   6: invokespecial #3                  // Method java/lang/Integer."<init>":(I)V
   9: astore_1      
  10: aload_1       
  11: invokestatic  #4                  // Method compare:(Ljava/lang/Number;)V
  14: return        

public static void compare(java.lang.Number);
  Code:
   0: bipush        10
   2: istore_1      
   3: getstatic     #5                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
   6: aload_0       
   7: bipush        10
   9: invokestatic  #6                  // Method java/lang/Integer.valueOf:(I)Ljava/lang/Integer;
  12: if_acmpne     19
  15: iconst_1      
  16: goto          20
  19: iconst_0      
  20: invokevirtual #7                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Z)V
  23: return
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Here are the acceptable unboxing conversions. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 2 '13 at 15:16
3  
-1 This isn't what happens when you look at the byte code. –  Aaron Digulla Sep 2 '13 at 15:24
    
@chrylis can you point me exactly where it is stated that unboxing is prefered in place of boxing? –  L4zy Sep 2 '13 at 15:28
    
@arshajii Thanks for the correction; I grabbed the wrong anchor. Fixed. –  chrylis Sep 2 '13 at 15:30
    
@chrylis: I removed my downvote but I don't see a difference in the second version. When I make the method private, it doesn't change anything :-/ –  Aaron Digulla Sep 2 '13 at 15:35

The code in your question gives me "Incompatible operand types Number and int" with Java 6 and 7 using the Eclipse compiler. With javac from Oracle's Java 7 SDK, it compiles and prints true.

Why?

The assignment Number n = 10 will be converted into Number n = Integer.valueOf(10);

Later, the compiler will create n == Integer.valueOf(10) (autoboxing the int value).

This gives true because Integer.valueOf() keeps an internal cache for small integer numbers and always returns the same instance for them:

Integer.valueOf(10) == Integer.valueOf(10)

But this is a just a side effect of the implementation, you should not rely on it.

Bytecode:

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
    Code:
       0: bipush        10
       2: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/Integer.valueOf:(I)Ljava/lang/Integer;
       5: astore_1      
       6: bipush        10
       8: istore_2      
       9: getstatic     #3                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
      12: aload_1       
      13: iload_2       
      14: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/Integer.valueOf:(I)Ljava/lang/Integer;
      17: if_acmpne     24
      20: iconst_1      
      21: goto          25
      24: iconst_0      
      25: invokevirtual #4                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Z)V
      28: return        
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Very interesting, thanks. –  BlackBox Sep 2 '13 at 15:23

The compiler in Oracle's JDK 7 allows you to compile the code by auto-boxing the primitive, but this violates the Java Language Specification.

According to JLS section 15.21, there are 3 variants of the equality operator:

15.21.1. Numerical Equality Operators == and !=

Describes the equality operator "if the operands of an equality operator are both of numeric type, or one is of numeric type and the other is convertible (§5.1.8) to numeric type". In this case, one of the operands has a numeric type, but the other operand is not convertible to a numeric type (unboxing).

15.21.2. Boolean Equality Operators == and !=

Describes the equality operator "if the operands of an equality operator are both of type boolean, or if one operand is of type boolean and the other is of type Boolean". This is also not the case.

15.21.3. Reference Equality Operators == and !=

Describes the equality operator "if the operands of an equality operator are both of either reference type or the null type". This is also not the case.

Since the operands to the == operator does not match any of the three variants defined in the JLS, the code should not compile.

What the Java 7 compiler actually does, is to use the reference equality operator by auto-boxing the primtive operand and then compare the references. Since the use of auto-boxing (convertion to a reference type according to §5.1.7) is not documented for this variant, like unboxing (§5.1.8) is specified for the numerical equality operator, the compiler applies functionality not documented by the JLS.

There is a bug for this behaviour in JDK 5 and 6, which is allegedly fixed. In Java 7, some automatic conversion and boxing/unboxing cases were added to the JLS and I almost assume that someone intended to add auto-boxing for the equality operator and left the bug in the compiler without actually updating the JLS.

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