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I have Task, Task1 and Task2. Task1 and Task2 are independent from each other, but both depend on the result of Task. I can make it work this way:

static async Task Test1()
{
    var task = Task.Delay(1000);

    var task1 = task.ContinueWith(_ => 
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Task1, thread: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
    });

    var task2 = task.ContinueWith(_ =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Task2, thread: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
    });

    await Task.WhenAll(task1, task2);
}

Or, alternatively, this way:

static async Task Test2()
{
    var task = Task.Delay(1000);
    await task;

    var task1 = Task.Run(() =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Task1, thread: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
    });

    var task2 = Task.Run(() =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Task2, thread: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
    });

    await Task.WhenAll(task1, task2);
}

Which way should I prefer? Are they both equally efficient? Is there a better way of composing this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think a better way of composing this would be to create separate async methods for the follow-up Tasks. Something like:

private static async Task Task1(Task task)
{
    await task;
    Console.WriteLine("Task1, thread: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
}

private static async Task Task2(Task task)
{
    await task;
    Console.WriteLine("Task2, thread: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
}

private static async Task Test1()
{
    var task = Task.Delay(1000);

    var task1 = Task1(task);
    var task2 = Task2(task);

    await Task.WhenAll(task1, task2);
}

This will act differently than your code with regard to synchronization context (if one is present), but you can affect that by using await task.ConfigureAwait(false).

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1  
I must be missing something but total duration is t+t1+t2 in this code (when I run on my computer). On the other hand it is t+max(t1,t2) in OP's cases. –  I4V Sep 2 '13 at 17:17
    
@I4V How do you measure the duration? If you use something like Thread.Sleep() and you run this on the UI thread, then yeah, that's what's going to happen. But if task1 and task2 were actually asynchronous, you would get the expected behavior. I mentioned that when synchronization context comes into play, this behaves differently than the original code. –  svick Sep 2 '13 at 18:23
1  
@I4V You're right and I certainly did not expect that. It seems that when both methods are waiting on the same Task, they are resumed on the same thread. But like I said before, if you want to execute two methods with significant synchronous work in parallel, use Task.Run() on them. –  svick Sep 2 '13 at 21:35
1  
I'll choose OP's first alternative. –  I4V Sep 2 '13 at 21:42
1  
@I4V, for svick's solution I measured timing like this: pastebin.com/JwvFjkxM. I believe it still does exactly what I need, and the timing I see is t+max(t1,t2) (3500ms), not t+t1+t2. Looks good to me. –  Noseratio Sep 3 '13 at 3:06

This is really not an answer, just another alternative

var task = Task.Delay(1000);
await task.ContinueWith(_ =>
    {
        Parallel.Invoke(
            () => {
                Console.WriteLine("Task1, thread: {0}",Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
            },
            () => {
                Console.WriteLine("Task2, thread: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
            });
    });
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