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I read an interesting DailyWTF post today, "Out of All The Possible Answers..." and it interested me enough to dig up the original forum post where it was submitted. This got me thinking how I would solve this interesting problem - the original question is posed on Project Euler as:

2520 is the smallest number that can be divided by each of the numbers from 1 to 10 without any remainder.

What is the smallest number that is evenly divisible by all of the numbers from 1 to 20?

To reform this as a programming question, how would you create a function that can find the Least Common Multiple for an arbitrary list of numbers?

I'm incredibly bad with pure math, despite my interest in programming, but I was able to solve this after a little Googling and some experimenting. I'm curious what other approaches SO users might take. If you're so inclined, post some code below, hopefully along with an explanation. Note that while I'm sure libraries exist to compute the GCD and LCM in various languages, I'm more interested in something that displays the logic more directly than calling a library function :-)

I'm most familiar with Python, C, C++, and Perl, but any language you prefer is welcome. Bonus points for explaining the logic for other mathematically-challenged folks out there like myself.

EDIT: After submitting I did find this similar question Least common multiple for 3 or more numbers but it was answered with the same basic code I already figured out and there's no real explanation, so I felt this was different enough to leave open.

share|improve this question
    
Duplicate? –  Alexander Kojevnikov Oct 9 '08 at 3:06
    
btw - is the answer 10581480? I believe it to be the right answer for the particular problem :) –  warren Feb 12 '09 at 19:12
1  
@warren - I was freaked out by your answer, as for a while I thought you were right (only just found this question), and the lcm calculator I wrote in Haskell was giving a wildly different answer, and 10581480 seemed to be divisible by [1..20]. I must have made a mistake somewhere as your answer is not evenly divisible by 11 or 16. The correct answer is 232792560. –  Matt Ellen Jan 28 '10 at 10:17
    
@Matt Ellen - good call, not sure how I missed 11 in my answer :) –  warren Jan 28 '10 at 14:27

10 Answers 10

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This problem is interesting because it doesn't require you to find the LCM of an arbitrary set of numbers, you're given a consecutive range. You can use a variation of the Sieve of Eratosthenes to find the answer.

def RangeLCM(first, last):
    factors = range(first, last+1)
    for i in range(0, len(factors)):
        if factors[i] != 1:
            n = first + i
            for j in range(2*n, last+1, n):
                factors[j-first] = factors[j-first] / factors[i]
    return reduce(lambda a,b: a*b, factors, 1)


Edit: A recent upvote made me re-examine this answer which is over 3 years old. My first observation is that I would have written it a little differently today, using enumerate for example.

The second observation is that this algorithm only works if the start of the range is 2 or less, because it doesn't try to sieve out the common factors below the start of the range. For example, RangeLCM(10, 12) returns 1320 instead of the correct 660.

The third observation is that nobody attempted to time this answer against any other answers. My gut said that this would improve over a brute force LCM solution as the range got larger. Testing proved my gut correct, at least this once.

Since the algorithm doesn't work for arbitrary ranges, I rewrote it to assume that the range starts at 1. I removed the call to reduce at the end, as it was easier to compute the result as the factors were generated. I believe the new version of the function is both more correct and easier to understand.

def RangeLCM2(last):
    factors = range(last+1)
    result = 1
    for n in range(last+1):
        if factors[n] > 1:
            result *= factors[n]
            for j in range(2*n, last+1, n):
                factors[j] /= factors[n]
    return result

Here are some timing comparisons against the original and the solution proposed by Joe Bebel which is called RangeEuclid in my tests.

>>> t=timeit.timeit
>>> t('RangeLCM.RangeLCM(1, 20)', 'import RangeLCM')
17.999292996735676
>>> t('RangeLCM.RangeEuclid(1, 20)', 'import RangeLCM')
11.199833288867922
>>> t('RangeLCM.RangeLCM2(20)', 'import RangeLCM')
14.256165588084514
>>> t('RangeLCM.RangeLCM(1, 100)', 'import RangeLCM')
93.34979585394194
>>> t('RangeLCM.RangeEuclid(1, 100)', 'import RangeLCM')
109.25695507389901
>>> t('RangeLCM.RangeLCM2(100)', 'import RangeLCM')
66.09684505991709

For the range of 1 to 20 given in the question, Euclid's algorithm beats out both my old and new answers. For the range of 1 to 100 you can see the sieve-based algorithm pull ahead, especially the optimized version.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks Mark! this is exactly the kind of interesting reply I had in mind :-) –  Jay Oct 9 '08 at 4:27
    
that is quite clever - I hadn't thought about it that way :) –  warren Oct 9 '08 at 11:31

The answer does not require any fancy footwork at all in terms of factoring or prime powers, and most certainly does not require the Sieve of Eratosthenes.

Instead, you should calculate the LCM of a single pair by computing the GCD using Euclid's algorithm (which does NOT require factorization, and in fact is significantly faster):


def lcm(a,b):
    gcd, tmp = a,b
    while tmp != 0:
        gcd,tmp = tmp, gcd % tmp
    return a*b/gcd

then you can find the total LCM my reducing the array using the above lcm() function:


reduce(lcm, range(1,21))
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, that's the same algorithm I ended up with, and also what was provided as the solution to the similar question. Seems to be the general consensus on how to solve this. –  Jay Oct 14 '08 at 10:04
    
Use return a*(b/gcd) or return (a/gcd)*b. Because a*b can be a large number. –  mag Apr 18 at 7:38

One-liner in Haskell.

wideLCM = foldl lcm 1

This is what I used for my own Project Euler Problem 5.

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There's a fast solution to this, so long as the range is 1 to N.

The key observation is that if n (< N) has prime factorization p_1^a_1 * p_2^a_2 * ... p_k * a_k, then it will contribute exactly the same factors to the LCM as p_1^a_1 and p_2^a_2, ... p_k^a_k. And each of these powers is also in the 1 to N range. Thus we only need to consider the highest pure prime powers less than N.

For example for 20 we have

2^4 = 16 < 20
3^2 = 9  < 20
5^1 = 5  < 20
7
11
13
17
19

Multiplying all these prime powers together we get the required result of

2*2*2*2*3*3*5*7*11*13*17*19 = 232792560

So in pseudo code:

def lcm_upto(N):
  total = 1;
  foreach p in primes_less_than(N):
    x=1;
    while x*p <= N:
      x=x*p;
    total = total * x
  return total

Now you can tweak the inner loop to work slightly differently to get more speed, and you can precalculate the primes_less_than(N) function.

EDIT:

Due to a recent upvote I decideded to revisit this, to see how the speed comparison with the other listed algorithms went.

Timing for range 1-160 with 10k iterations, against Joe Beibers and Mark Ransoms methods are as follows:

Joes : 1.85s Marks : 3.26s Mine : 0.33s

Here's a log-log graph with the results up to 300.

A log-log graph with the results

Code for my test can be found here:

import timeit


def RangeLCM2(last):
    factors = range(last+1)
    result = 1
    for n in range(last+1):
        if factors[n] > 1:
            result *= factors[n]
            for j in range(2*n, last+1, n):
                factors[j] /= factors[n]
    return result


def lcm(a,b):
    gcd, tmp = a,b
    while tmp != 0:
        gcd,tmp = tmp, gcd % tmp
    return a*b/gcd

def EuclidLCM(last):
    return reduce(lcm,range(1,last+1))

primes = [
 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 
 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 
 73, 79, 83, 89, 97, 101, 103, 107, 109, 113, 
 127, 131, 137, 139, 149, 151, 157, 163, 167, 173, 
 179, 181, 191, 193, 197, 199, 211, 223, 227, 229, 
 233, 239, 241, 251, 257, 263, 269, 271, 277, 281, 
 283, 293, 307, 311, 313, 317, 331, 337, 347, 349, 
 353, 359, 367, 373, 379, 383, 389, 397, 401, 409, 
 419, 421, 431, 433, 439, 443, 449, 457, 461, 463, 
 467, 479, 487, 491, 499, 503, 509, 521, 523, 541, 
 547, 557, 563, 569, 571, 577, 587, 593, 599, 601, 
 607, 613, 617, 619, 631, 641, 643, 647, 653, 659, 
 661, 673, 677, 683, 691, 701, 709, 719, 727, 733, 
 739, 743, 751, 757, 761, 769, 773, 787, 797, 809, 
 811, 821, 823, 827, 829, 839, 853, 857, 859, 863, 
 877, 881, 883, 887, 907, 911, 919, 929, 937, 941, 
 947, 953, 967, 971, 977, 983, 991, 997 ]

def FastRangeLCM(last):
    total = 1
    for p in primes:
        if p>last:
            break
        x = 1
        while x*p <= last:
            x = x * p
        total = total * x
    return total


print RangeLCM2(20)
print EculidLCM(20)
print FastRangeLCM(20)

print timeit.Timer( 'RangeLCM2(20)', "from __main__ import RangeLCM2").timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'EuclidLCM(20)', "from __main__ import EuclidLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'FastRangeLCM(20)', "from __main__ import FastRangeLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)

print timeit.Timer( 'RangeLCM2(40)', "from __main__ import RangeLCM2").timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'EuclidLCM(40)', "from __main__ import EuclidLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'FastRangeLCM(40)', "from __main__ import FastRangeLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)

print timeit.Timer( 'RangeLCM2(60)', "from __main__ import RangeLCM2").timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'EuclidLCM(60)', "from __main__ import EuclidLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'FastRangeLCM(60)', "from __main__ import FastRangeLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)

print timeit.Timer( 'RangeLCM2(80)', "from __main__ import RangeLCM2").timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'EuclidLCM(80)', "from __main__ import EuclidLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'FastRangeLCM(80)', "from __main__ import FastRangeLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)

print timeit.Timer( 'RangeLCM2(100)', "from __main__ import RangeLCM2").timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'EuclidLCM(100)', "from __main__ import EuclidLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'FastRangeLCM(100)', "from __main__ import FastRangeLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)

print timeit.Timer( 'RangeLCM2(120)', "from __main__ import RangeLCM2").timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'EuclidLCM(120)', "from __main__ import EuclidLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'FastRangeLCM(120)', "from __main__ import FastRangeLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)

print timeit.Timer( 'RangeLCM2(140)', "from __main__ import RangeLCM2").timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'EuclidLCM(140)', "from __main__ import EuclidLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'FastRangeLCM(140)', "from __main__ import FastRangeLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)

print timeit.Timer( 'RangeLCM2(160)', "from __main__ import RangeLCM2").timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'EuclidLCM(160)', "from __main__ import EuclidLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)
print timeit.Timer( 'FastRangeLCM(160)', "from __main__ import FastRangeLCM" ).timeit(number=10000)
share|improve this answer
1  
Instead of that lengthy list of primes<1000, you can say primes = [2,3]+[x for x in range(5,1000,2) if pow(3,x-1,x)==1==pow(2,x-1,x)] which executes in less than a millisecond. –  jwpat7 May 20 '13 at 17:23

In Haskell:

listLCM xs =  foldr (lcm) 1 xs

Which you can pass a list eg:

*Main> listLCM [1..10]
2520
*Main> listLCM [1..2518]
266595767785593803705412270464676976610857635334657316692669925537787454299898002207461915073508683963382517039456477669596355816643394386272505301040799324518447104528530927421506143709593427822789725553843015805207718967822166927846212504932185912903133106741373264004097225277236671818323343067283663297403663465952182060840140577104161874701374415384744438137266768019899449317336711720217025025587401208623105738783129308128750455016347481252967252000274360749033444720740958140380022607152873903454009665680092965785710950056851148623283267844109400949097830399398928766093150813869944897207026562740359330773453263501671059198376156051049807365826551680239328345262351788257964260307551699951892369982392731547941790155541082267235224332660060039217194224518623199770191736740074323689475195782613618695976005218868557150389117325747888623795360149879033894667051583457539872594336939497053549704686823966843769912686273810907202177232140876251886218209049469761186661055766628477277347438364188994340512556761831159033404181677107900519850780882430019800537370374545134183233280000
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The LCM of one or more numbers is the product of all of the distinct prime factors in all of the numbers, each prime to the power of the max of all the powers to which that prime appears in the numbers one is taking the LCM of.

Say 900 = 2^3 * 3^2 * 5^2, 26460 = 2^2 * 3^3 * 5^1 * 7^2. The max power of 2 is 3, the max power of 3 is 3, the max power of 5 is 1, the max power of 7 is 2, and the max power of any higher prime is 0. So the LCM is: 264600 = 2^3 * 3^3 * 5^2 * 7^2.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response, it looks like you and Warren provided the same basic answer. I was hoping people would post samples showing different approaches to solving this in code, it'd be great if you could post an algorithmic approach using this techqnique! –  Jay Oct 9 '08 at 3:39
print "LCM of 4 and 5 = ".LCM(4,5)."\n";

sub LCM {
    my ($a,$b) = @_;    
    my ($af,$bf) = (1,1);   # The factors to apply to a & b

    # Loop and increase until A times its factor equals B times its factor
    while ($a*$af != $b*$bf) {
        if ($a*$af>$b*$bf) {$bf++} else {$af++};
    }
    return $a*$af;
}
share|improve this answer

An algorithm in Haskell. This is the language I think in nowadays for algorithmic thinking. This might seem strange, complicated, and uninviting -- welcome to Haskell!

primes :: (Integral a) => [a]
--implementation of primes is to be left for another day.

primeFactors :: (Integral a) => a -> [a]
primeFactors n = go n primes where
    go n ps@(p : pt) =
        if q < 1 then [] else
        if r == 0 then p : go q ps else
        go n pt
        where (q, r) = quotRem n p

multiFactors :: (Integral a) => a -> [(a, Int)]
multiFactors n = [ (head xs, length xs) | xs <- group $ primeFactors $ n ]

multiProduct :: (Integral a) => [(a, Int)] -> a
multiProduct xs = product $ map (uncurry (^)) $ xs

mergeFactorsPairwise [] bs = bs
mergeFactorsPairwise as [] = as
mergeFactorsPairwise a@((an, am) : _) b@((bn, bm) : _) =
    case compare an bn of
        LT -> (head a) : mergeFactorsPairwise (tail a) b
        GT -> (head b) : mergeFactorsPairwise a (tail b)
        EQ -> (an, max am bm) : mergeFactorsPairwise (tail a) (tail b)

wideLCM :: (Integral a) => [a] -> a
wideLCM nums = multiProduct $ foldl mergeFactorsPairwise [] $ map multiFactors $ nums
share|improve this answer
1  
I think you've over engineered it –  Dan Oct 11 '08 at 4:35
    
I already had primeFactors, multiFactors, and multiProduct written for some other purposes (mathematical interest, mostly). The other two functions weren't too bad. –  yfeldblum Oct 13 '08 at 1:19

Here's my Python stab at it:

#!/usr/bin/env python

from operator import mul

def factor(n):
    factors = {}
    i = 2 
    while i <= n and n != 1:
        while n % i == 0:
            try:
                factors[i] += 1
            except KeyError:
                factors[i] = 1
            n = n / i
        i += 1
    return factors

base = {}
for i in range(2, 2000):
    for f, n in factor(i).items():
        try:
            base[f] = max(base[f], n)
        except KeyError:
            base[f] = n

print reduce(mul, [f**n for f, n in base.items()], 1)

Step one gets the prime factors of a number. Step two builds a hash table of the maximum number of times each factor was seen, then multiplies them all together.

share|improve this answer

In expanding on @Alexander's comment, I'd point out that if you can factor the numbers to their primes, remove duplicates, then multiply-out, you'll have your answer.

For example, 1-5 have the prime factors of 2,3,2,2,5. Remove the duplicated '2' from the factor list of the '4', and you have 2,2,3,5. Multiplying those together yields 60, which is your answer.

The Wolfram link provided in the previous comment, http://mathworld.wolfram.com/LeastCommonMultiple.html goes into a much more formal approach, but the short version is above.

Cheers.

share|improve this answer
2  
Unclear what "remove duplicates" mean. You're removing the '2' from the 2 because it's captured by the factorization of the 4. That's not just semantics. Justice puts it a little better. . .you want to take just the value of the MAX power of each prime. Then, you know lower powers are factors. –  Baltimark Feb 12 '09 at 19:44
    
@Baltimark - excellent point –  warren Jul 19 '12 at 18:18

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