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I have a class Foo, I create a child case Bar. Why must I initialize the @foo_count in the child-class if it's already been initialized in the parent class?

Please advise?

class Foo
  @foo_count = 0  
end

class Bar < Foo
  @foo_count = 100
end
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instance variables attach themselves to whatever object is self at the time they are created. The instance variable @foo_count in Foo attaches to the Foo class object, and therefore it is called a class instance variable. Similarly, the instance variable @foo_count in Bar attaches itself to the Bar class object. As a result, there are two class instance variables--not one. Objects do not share instance variables--each object has its own instance variables.

class Foo
  puts self

  @foo_count = 0  
end

class Bar < Foo
  puts self

  @foo_count = 100
end

--output:--
Foo
Bar

By the way, if you want variables to be inherited you can use class variables:

class Foo
  @@foo_count = 'hello' 
end

class Bar < Foo
  def greet
    puts @@foo_count
  end

end

Bar.new.greet

--output:--
hello

However, many people consider using class variables to be bad practice. They do not act like class variables in other languages, and therefore they produce unexpected consequences, so generally people stick to class instance variables.

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Why so? Okay Let me tell you then this way :

class Foo
  @foo_count = 0  
end

class Bar < Foo;end

Bar.instance_variables # => []
Foo.instance_variables # => [:@foo_count]

@foo_count class instance variable of the class Foo. Whenever you will be creating a subclass like a Bar, from a super class like Foo, don't think that class instance variable will be inherited to the class Bar. Now see -

class Foo
  @foo_count = 0  
end

class Bar < Foo
  @foo_count = 10
end

Bar.instance_variables # => [:@foo_count]
Foo.instance_variables # => [:@foo_count]

Now both the object Foo and Bar have their instance variable,having same name @foo_count only,that doesn't mean that they are sharing the same instance variable.Each object has always its own copy of instance variables.

Here some more examples to get the things clear to you :-

class Foo
  @foo_count = 0 
  def self.meth_foo 
    @foo_count
  end 
end

class Bar < Foo
  #@foo_count = 10
end

Foo.meth_foo # => 0
Bar.meth_foo # => nil

But now -

class Foo
  @foo_count = 0 
  def self.meth_foo 
    @foo_count
  end 
end

class Bar < Foo
  @foo_count = 10
end

Foo.meth_foo # => 0
Bar.meth_foo # => 10
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