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I have a pointer variable int ***a in C. I'm passing it to a function as &a i.e reference. In the function I'm getting a pointer variable of type int ****a. I'm allocating memory like this.

*a=(int***)malloc(no1*sizeof(int**));
some loop from 0 to no1
    (*a)[++l]=(int**)malloc((no1+1)*sizeof(int*));
some loop from 0 to no1
    (*a)[l][h]=(int*)malloc(2*sizeof(int));

This is only the time I allocated memory. The actual program is not given; no error here. But when I'm going to do this:

(*a)[l][h][0]=no1;

It's giving me a "Segmentation Fault" error and I can't understand why.

UPDATE: I have wrote a sample program which is to allocate the memory only. This is also giving "segmentation fault" error.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<malloc.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

void allocate(int ****a)
{
    int i,j,k;
    if(((*a)=(int***)malloc(5*sizeof(int**)))==NULL)
    {
        printf("\nError in allocation of double pointer array\n");
        exit(0);
    }
    for(i=0;i<5;i++)if(((*a)[i]=(int**)malloc(4*sizeof(int*)))==NULL)
    {
        printf("\nError in allocation of single pointer array on index [%d]\n",i);
        exit(0);
    }
    for(i=0;i<5;i++)
        for(j=0;j<4;i++)
            if(((*a)[i][j]=(int*)malloc(3*sizeof(int)))==NULL)
            {
                printf("\nError in allocation of array on index [%d][%d]\n",i,j);
                exit(0);
            }
    for(i=0;i<5;i++)
        for(j=0;j<4;i++)
            for(k=0;k<3;k++)
                (*a)[i][j][k]=k;
}

main()
{
    int ***a;
    int i,j,k;
    allocate(&a);
    for(i=0;i<5;i++)
        for(j=0;j<4;i++)
            for(k=0;k<3;k++)
                printf("\na[%d][%d][%d]  = %d ",i,j,k,a[i][j][k]);
}
share|improve this question
7  
That's not a 3D array. That's a pointer-to-pointer-to-pointer. And being a three-star programmer is not a compliment. –  user529758 Sep 2 '13 at 19:24
2  
It would probably help if you could expand the pseudocode for the allocation loops. Also you could state what l and h are in the piece of code that segfaults. –  marc Sep 2 '13 at 19:29
1  
@JayadrathaMondal Instead of adding another level of indirection, what if you used an actual 3D array? (Or at least a pointer to its first element...) Like this: int (*arr)[y][z] = malloc(x * sizeof(arr[0])); –  user529758 Sep 2 '13 at 19:32
1  
@H2CO3 Assuming VLAs are tested for and claim support on your implementation (most all do), I concur, that is a much cleaner approach. (i'd check sizeof() with VLAs, however, I'm pretty sure it doesn't work and you still have to do the math by-hand). –  WhozCraig Sep 2 '13 at 19:38
2  
@JayadrathaMondal: Please post actual C code. You probably have an error in the allocation code. We can't help you otherwise (apart from stylistic advice ;) ) –  marc Sep 2 '13 at 19:50
show 9 more comments

3 Answers

Revised code from question

Your code has:

for(i=0;i<5;i++)
    for(j=0;j<4;i++)

several times. The second loop should be incrementing j, not i. Be very careful with copy'n'paste.

This code does not crash (but does leak).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void allocate(int ****a);

void allocate(int ****a)
{
    int i,j,k;
    printf("allocate: 1B\n");
    if(((*a)=(int***)malloc(5*sizeof(int**)))==NULL)
    {
        printf("\nError in allocation of double pointer array\n");
        exit(0);
    }
    printf("allocate: 1A\n");

    printf("allocate: 2B\n");
    for(i=0;i<5;i++)
        if(((*a)[i]=(int**)malloc(4*sizeof(int*)))==NULL)
        {
            printf("\nError in allocation of single pointer array on index [%d]\n",i);
            exit(0);
        }
    printf("allocate: 2A\n");
    printf("allocate: 3B\n");
    for(i=0;i<5;i++)
        for(j=0;j<4;j++)
            if(((*a)[i][j]=(int*)malloc(3*sizeof(int)))==NULL)
            {
                printf("\nError in allocation of array on index [%d][%d]\n",i,j);
                exit(0);
            }
    printf("allocate: 3A\n");

    printf("allocate: 4B\n");
    for(i=0;i<5;i++)
        for(j=0;j<4;j++)
            for(k=0;k<3;k++)
                (*a)[i][j][k]=k;
    printf("allocate: 4A\n");
}

int main(void)
{
    int ***a;
    int i,j,k;
    allocate(&a);
    for(i=0;i<5;i++)
        for(j=0;j<4;j++)
            for(k=0;k<3;k++)
                printf("a[%d][%d][%d]  = %d\n",i,j,k,a[i][j][k]);
}

Previous answers

Since you've not shown us most of the code, it is hard to predict how you're mishandling it, but equally, since you are getting a core dump, you must be mishandling something.

Here is some working code — not checked with valgrind since that is not available for Mac OS X 10.8 — that seems to work. The error recovery for allocation failure is not complete, and the function to destroy the fully allocated array is also missing.

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static int ***allocate_3d_array(int no1, int ****a)
{
    *a = (int***)malloc(no1 * sizeof(int**));
    if (*a == 0)
        return 0;

    for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
    {
        if (((*a)[l]=(int**)malloc((no1+1)*sizeof(int*))) == 0)
        {
            while (l > 0)
                free((*a)[--l]);
            return 0;
        }
    }

    for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
    {
        for (int h = 0; h < no1; h++)
        {
            if (((*a)[l][h]=(int*)malloc(2*sizeof(int))) == 0)
            {
                /* Leak! */
                return 0;
            }
        }
    }

    for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
        for (int h = 0; h < no1; h++)
            for (int k = 0; k < 2; k++)
                (*a)[l][h][k] = 10000 * l + 100 * h + k;

    return *a;
}

int main(void)
{
    int no1 = 5;
    int ***a = 0;
    int ***b = allocate_3d_array(no1, &a);
    const char *pad[] = { "  ", "\n" };
    assert(b == a);

    if (a != 0)
    {
        for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
            for (int h = 0; h < no1; h++)
                for (int k = 0; k < 2; k++)
                    printf("a[%d][%d][%d] = %.6d%s", l, h, k, a[l][h][k], pad[k]);

        // free memory - added by harpun; reformatted by Jonathan Leffler
        // Would be a function normally — see version 2 code.
        for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
        {
            for (int h = 0; h < no1; h++)
                free(a[l][h]);
            free(a[l]);
        }
        free(a);
    }

    return 0;
}

Sample output:

a[0][0][0] = 000000  a[0][0][1] = 000001
a[0][1][0] = 000100  a[0][1][1] = 000101
a[0][2][0] = 000200  a[0][2][1] = 000201
a[0][3][0] = 000300  a[0][3][1] = 000301
a[0][4][0] = 000400  a[0][4][1] = 000401
a[1][0][0] = 010000  a[1][0][1] = 010001
a[1][1][0] = 010100  a[1][1][1] = 010101
a[1][2][0] = 010200  a[1][2][1] = 010201
a[1][3][0] = 010300  a[1][3][1] = 010301
a[1][4][0] = 010400  a[1][4][1] = 010401
a[2][0][0] = 020000  a[2][0][1] = 020001
a[2][1][0] = 020100  a[2][1][1] = 020101
a[2][2][0] = 020200  a[2][2][1] = 020201
a[2][3][0] = 020300  a[2][3][1] = 020301
a[2][4][0] = 020400  a[2][4][1] = 020401
a[3][0][0] = 030000  a[3][0][1] = 030001
a[3][1][0] = 030100  a[3][1][1] = 030101
a[3][2][0] = 030200  a[3][2][1] = 030201
a[3][3][0] = 030300  a[3][3][1] = 030301
a[3][4][0] = 030400  a[3][4][1] = 030401
a[4][0][0] = 040000  a[4][0][1] = 040001
a[4][1][0] = 040100  a[4][1][1] = 040101
a[4][2][0] = 040200  a[4][2][1] = 040201
a[4][3][0] = 040300  a[4][3][1] = 040301
a[4][4][0] = 040400  a[4][4][1] = 040401

Compare this with what you've got. You could add many more diagnostic print messages. If this doesn't help sufficiently, create an SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example) analogous to this that demonstrates the problem in your code without any extraneous material.

Version 2 of the code

This is a somewhat more complex version of the code that simulates memory allocation failures after N allocations (and a test harness that runs it with every value of N from 0 up to 35, where there are actually only 30 allocations for the array. It also includes code to release the array (similar to, but different from, the code that was edited into my answer by harpun. The interaction at the end with the line containing the PID means that I can check memory usage with ps in another terminal window. (Otherwise, I don't like programs that do that sort of thing — I suppose I should run the ps from my program via system(), but I'm feeling lazy.)

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

static int fail_after = 0;
static int num_allocs = 0;

static void *xmalloc(size_t size)
{
    if (fail_after > 0 && num_allocs++ >= fail_after)
    {
        fputs("Out of memory\n", stdout);
        return 0;
    }
    return malloc(size);
}

static int ***allocate_3d_array(int no1, int ****a)
{
    *a = (int***)xmalloc(no1 * sizeof(int**));
    if (*a == 0)
        return 0;

    for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
    {
        if (((*a)[l]=(int**)xmalloc((no1+1)*sizeof(int*))) == 0)
        {
            for (int l1 = 0; l1 < l; l1++)
                free((*a)[l1]);
            free(*a);
            *a = 0;
            return 0;
        }
    }

    for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
    {
        for (int h = 0; h < no1; h++)
        {
            if (((*a)[l][h]=(int*)xmalloc(2*sizeof(int))) == 0)
            {
                /* Release prior items in current row */
                for (int h1 = 0; h1 < h; h1++)
                    free((*a)[l][h1]);
                free((*a)[l]);
                /* Release items in prior rows */
                for (int l1 = 0; l1 < l; l1++)
                {
                    for (int h1 = 0; h1 < no1; h1++)
                        free((*a)[l1][h1]);
                    free((*a)[l1]);
                }
                free(*a);
                *a = 0;
                return 0;
            }
        }
    }

    for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
        for (int h = 0; h < no1; h++)
            for (int k = 0; k < 2; k++)
                (*a)[l][h][k] = 10000 * l + 100 * h + k;

    return *a;
}

static void destroy_3d_array(int no1, int ***a)
{
    if (a != 0)
    {
        for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
        {
            for (int h = 0; h < no1; h++)
                free(a[l][h]);
            free(a[l]);
        }
        free(a);
    }
}

static void test_allocation(int no1)
{
    int ***a = 0;
    int ***b = allocate_3d_array(no1, &a);
    const char *pad[] = { "  ", "\n" };
    assert(b == a);

    if (a != 0)
    {
        for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
        {
            for (int h = 0; h < no1; h++)
            {
                for (int k = 0; k < 2; k++)
                {
                    if (a[l][h][k] != l * 10000 + h * 100 + k)
                        printf("a[%d][%d][%d] = %.6d%s", l, h, k, a[l][h][k], pad[k]);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    destroy_3d_array(no1, a);
}

int main(void)
{
    int no1 = 5;

    for (fail_after = 0; fail_after < 33; fail_after++)
    {
        printf("Fail after: %d\n", fail_after);
        num_allocs = 0;
        test_allocation(no1);
    }

    printf("PID %d - waiting for some data to exit:", (int)getpid());
    fflush(0);
    getchar();

    return 0;
}

Note how painful the memory recovery is. As before, not tested with valgrind, but I take reassurance from harpun's test on the previous version.

Version 3 — Clean bill of health from valgrind

This code is very similar to the test in version 2. It fixes a memory leak in the clean-up when a memory allocation fails in the leaf level allocations. The program no longer prompts for inputs (much preferable); it takes an optional single argument that is the number of allocations to fail after. Testing with valgrind showed that with an argument 0-6, there were no leaks, but with argument 7 there was a leak. It didn't take long to spot the problem and fix it. (It's easier when the machine running valgrind is available — it was powered down over the long weekend for general site electrical supply upgrade.)

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static int fail_after = 0;
static int num_allocs = 0;

static void *xmalloc(size_t size)
{
    if (fail_after > 0 && num_allocs++ >= fail_after)
    {
        fputs("Out of memory\n", stdout);
        return 0;
    }
    return malloc(size);
}

static int ***allocate_3d_array(int no1, int ****a)
{
    *a = (int***)xmalloc(no1 * sizeof(int**));
    if (*a == 0)
        return 0;

    for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
    {
        if (((*a)[l]=(int**)xmalloc((no1+1)*sizeof(int*))) == 0)
        {
            for (int l1 = 0; l1 < l; l1++)
                free((*a)[l1]);
            free(*a);
            *a = 0;
            return 0;
        }
    }

    for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
    {
        for (int h = 0; h < no1; h++)
        {
            if (((*a)[l][h]=(int*)xmalloc(2*sizeof(int))) == 0)
            {
                /* Release prior items in current (partial) row */
                for (int h1 = 0; h1 < h; h1++)
                    free((*a)[l][h1]);
                /* Release items in prior (complete) rows */
                for (int l1 = 0; l1 < l; l1++)
                {
                    for (int h1 = 0; h1 < no1; h1++)
                        free((*a)[l1][h1]);
                }
                /* Release entries in first (complete) level of array */
                for (int l1 = 0; l1 < no1; l1++)
                    free((*a)[l1]);
                free(*a);
                *a = 0;
                return 0;
            }
        }
    }

    for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
        for (int h = 0; h < no1; h++)
            for (int k = 0; k < 2; k++)
                (*a)[l][h][k] = 10000 * l + 100 * h + k;

    return *a;
}

static void destroy_3d_array(int no1, int ***a)
{
    if (a != 0)
    {
        for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
        {
            for (int h = 0; h < no1; h++)
                free(a[l][h]);
            free(a[l]);
        }
        free(a);
    }
}

static void test_allocation(int no1)
{
    int ***a = 0;
    int ***b = allocate_3d_array(no1, &a);
    const char *pad[] = { "  ", "\n" };
    assert(b == a);

    if (a != 0)
    {
        for (int l = 0; l < no1; l++)
        {
            for (int h = 0; h < no1; h++)
            {
                for (int k = 0; k < 2; k++)
                {
                    if (a[l][h][k] != l * 10000 + h * 100 + k)
                        printf("a[%d][%d][%d] = %.6d%s", l, h, k, a[l][h][k], pad[k]);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    destroy_3d_array(no1, a);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int no1 = 5;
    int fail_limit = 33;

    if (argc == 2)
        fail_limit = atoi(argv[1]);

    for (fail_after = 0; fail_after < fail_limit; fail_after++)
    {
        printf("Fail after: %d\n", fail_after);
        num_allocs = 0;
        test_allocation(no1);
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 .. but shouldn't the cast of malloc's return value be avoided? –  undur_gongor Sep 2 '13 at 20:13
    
The allocation is valid. I checked it with valgrind and added the missing code for memory cleanup. –  harpun Sep 2 '13 at 20:18
    
I checked the allocation time checking if allocated or not. Like what you have done. There has no error. Only when Im inserting value in the array by giving all 3 index error occures. Everything is done like your code. :( –  Jayadratha Mondal Sep 2 '13 at 20:19
1  
@JayadrathaMondal: Please show the actual code. Maybe it's something as simple as an off-by-one error in your loops. –  undur_gongor Sep 2 '13 at 20:20
1  
@undur_gongor: It depends on who you speak to. If you ask the majority of C contributors here, the cast is not desirable. I learned to program C on a system where the casts were mandatory, in the days before the C89 standard, when malloc() returned a char *, and on a machine where the bit pattern for the char * value of an address was different from the int * value of the same address (so not casting led to crashes). I don't castigate people for doing what was once necessary. It is explicit. If you compile with prototypes always required, the problems people worry about don't happen. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 2 '13 at 20:33
show 5 more comments

Sorry, but, to be blunt: this is a horrid way of handling a 3D array: a double-nested loop with a bucketload of calls to malloc(), then triple-indirection to get a value at runtime. Yeuch! :o)

The conventional way of doing this (in the HPC community) is to use a one-dimensional array and do the index computation yourself. Suppose index i iterates over nx planes in the x direction, j iterates over ny pencils in the y direction, and k iterates over nz cells in the z direction. Then a pencil has nz elements, a plane has nz*ny elements, and the whole “brick” has nz*ny*nx elements. Thus, you can iterate over the whole structure with:

for(i=0; i<nx; i++) {
    for(j=0; j<ny; j++) {
        for(k=0; k<nz; k++) {
            printf("a(%d,%d,%d) = %d\n", i, j, k, a[(i*ny+j)*nz+k]);
        }
    }
}

The advantage of this construction is that you can allocate it with a single call to malloc(), rather than a boatload of nested calls:

int *a;
a = malloc(nx*ny*nz*sizeof(int));

The construction x=a[i][j][k] has three levels of indirection: you have to fetch an address from memory, a, add an offset, i, fetch that address from memory, a[i], add an offset, j, fetch that address from memory, a[i][j], add an offset, k, and (finally) fetch the data, a[i][j][k]. All those intermediate pointers are wasting cache-lines and TLB entries.

The construction x=a[(i*ny+j)*nz+k] has one level of indirection at the expense of two additional integer multiplications: compute the offset, fetch address, 'a', from memory, compute and add the offset, (i*ny+j)*nz+k, fetch the data.

Furthermore, there is essentially no way whatsoever of improving the triple-indirection method's performance based on data-access patterns. If we were actually visiting every cell, we could do something like this to avoid some of the overhead of index computation.

ij = 0;
for(i=0; i<nx; i++) {
    ii=i*ny;
    for(j=0; j<ny; j++) {
        ij=(ii+j)*nz;
        for(k=0; k<nz; k++) {
            printf("a(%d,%d,%d) = %d\n", i, j, k, a[ij+k]);
        }
    }
}

Depending on what you're doing, this may not be great either, and there all alternative layouts and indexing methods (such as Morton or Ahnenteufel indexing) that may be more suitable, depending on your access patterns. I'm not trying to give a complete treatise on 3D Cartesian grid representation or indexing, merely illustrate that a “three star” solution is very bad for numerous reasons.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1: I agree with your conclusion that a 3D array is better handled as you show and not as shown in the question. On the other hand, if coded with (rather a lot of) care, the 3D notation can be made to work. It is irksome for all concerned that the OP won't show the real code that is crashing as it is very difficult to diagnose problems in invisible code. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 2 '13 at 20:57
    
I agree that the 3D notation can be made to work (as a layer on top of the conventional 1D solution), but at the expense of more memory ((nx+ny)*sizeof(int(*)) and lots of extra dereferencing at runtime. OK for very small grids, maybe, but I see no reason not to do it the conventional way to begin with. If you are really burning to have the convenience of “i,j,k” style indexing, you can do it with a macro. –  Emmet Sep 2 '13 at 21:10
add comment

By using (*a)[l][h][0] you are trying to de-reference a plain int and not a pointer.

use a[l][h][0] directly to assign any value to it.

share|improve this answer
1  
The actual variable is in main() that is ***a. It is passed as parameter &a in the function. So using * in front of a –  Jayadratha Mondal Sep 2 '13 at 19:37
    
How did you declare the function 1[ <ret type > funcname ( int**** a) {...} –  Rahiakil Sep 2 '13 at 19:53
    
And agree with the fact from some one above that we need a complete example, the allocation code could have an issue [ like the no1 being 0 etc ] –  Rahiakil Sep 2 '13 at 19:55
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