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I have an output that looks like this, where the first number corresponds to the count of the type below (e.g. 72 for Type 4, etc)

 72
 Type
 4
 51
 Type
 5
 66
 Type
 6
 78
 Type
 7
 ..etc

Is there a way to organize this data to look something like this:

 Type 4 = 72 times
 Type 5 = 51 times
 Type 6 = 66 times 
 etc.. 

Essentially, the question is how to take a single column of data and sort /organize it into something more readable using bash, awk, python, etc. (Ideally, in bash, but interested to know how to do in Python).

Thank you.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use paste to join 3 consecutive lines from stdin, then just rearrange the fields.

paste - - - < file | awk '{print $2, $3, "=", $1, "times"}'
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Worked great. Thanks! –  user1698774 Sep 2 '13 at 20:15
    
If your data is not in a file but lives on stdout, you don't need to send it to a file first: your pipeline | paste - - - | ... –  glenn jackman Sep 2 '13 at 20:19

It's simple enough with Python to read three lines of data at a time:

def perthree(iterable):
    return zip(*[iter(iterable)] * 3)

with open(inputfile) as infile:
    for count, type_, type_num in perthree(infile):
        print('{} {} = {} times'.format(type_.strip(), type_num.strip(), count.strip()))

The .strip() calls remove any extra whitespace, including the newline at the end of each line of input text.

Demo:

>>> with open(inputfile) as infile:
...     for count, type_, type_num in perthree(infile):
...         print('{} {} = {} times'.format(type_.strip(), type_num.strip(), count.strip()))
... 
Type 4 = 72 times
Type 5 = 51 times
Type 6 = 66 times
Type 7 = 78 times
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In Bash:

#!/bin/bash
A=() I=0
while read -r LINE; do
    if (( (M = ++I % 3) )); then
        A[M]=$LINE
    else
        printf "%s %s = %s times\n" "${A[2]}" "$LINE" "${A[1]}"
    fi
done

Running bash script.sh < file creates:

Type 4 = 72 times
Type 5 = 51 times
Type 6 = 66 times
Type 7 = 78 times

Note: With a default IFS ($' \t\n'), read would remove leading and trailing spaces by default.

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Try this awk one liner:

$ awk 'NR%3==1{n=$1}NR%3==2{t=$1}NR%3==0{print t,$1,"=",n,"times"}' file
Type 4 = 72 times
Type 5 = 51 times
Type 6 = 66 times
Type 7 = 78 times

How it works?

awk '
    NR%3==1{ # if we are on lines 1,4,7, etc (NR is the record number (or the line number)
        n=$1 # set the variable n to the first (and only) word
    }
    NR%3==2{ # if we are on lines 2,5,7, etc 
        t=$1 # set the variable t to the first (and only) word
    }
    NR%3==0{ # if we are on lines 3,6,9, etc
        print t,$1,"=",n,"times" # print the desired output 
    }' file
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Mind explaining the code? Thanks. –  user1698774 Sep 2 '13 at 20:03
    
@user1698774 Added an explanation. Let me know if it is still unclear –  user000001 Sep 2 '13 at 20:08

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