Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know power of 2 can be implemented using << operator. What about power of 10? Like 10^5? Is there any way faster than pow(10,5) in C++? It is a pretty straight-forward computation by hand. But seems not easy for computers due to binary representation of the numbers... Let us assume I am only interested in integer powers, 10^n, where n is an integer.

share|improve this question
5  
Use a lookup table? –  Mehrdad Sep 2 '13 at 22:28
    
Maybe 1 <<<<< 5? –  Kerrek SB Sep 2 '13 at 22:31
1  
A lookup table is only useful if you are raising to the power of integer values or decimal values that can be scaled to an integer. If it can be an arbitrary float, you are stuck with pow or an equivalent library. –  paddy Sep 2 '13 at 22:32
1  
If it's always 10 on the one side, and an integer on the other side, you could write your own table and be done with it. Can't get quicker than that - it's literally one memory read and one or two simple operations to index into the table. –  Mats Petersson Sep 2 '13 at 22:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Something like this:

int quick_pow10(int n)
{
    static int pow10[10] = {
        1, 10, 100, 1000, 10000, 
        100000, 1000000, 10000000, 100000000, 1000000000
    };

    return pow10[n]; 
}

Obviously, can do the same thing for long long.

This should be several times faster than any competing method. However, it is quite limited if you have lots of bases (although the number of values goes down quite dramatically with largeer bases), so if there isn't a huge number of combinations, it's still doable.

As a comparison:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cmath>

static int quick_pow10(int n)
{
    static int pow10[10] = {
        1, 10, 100, 1000, 10000, 
        100000, 1000000, 10000000, 100000000, 1000000000
    };

    return pow10[n]; 
}

static int integer_pow(int x, int n)
{
    int r = 1;
    while (n--)
    r *= x;

    return r; 
}

static int opt_int_pow(int n)
{
    int r = 1;
    const int x = 10;
    while (n)
    {
    if (n & 1) 
    {
        r *= x;
    }
    else
    {
        r *= x * x;
        n -= 2;
    }
    }

    return r; 
}


int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    long long sum = 0;
    int n = strtol(argv[1], 0, 0);
    const long outer_loops = 1000000000;

    if (argv[2][0] == 'a')
    {
    for(long i = 0; i < outer_loops / n; i++)
    {
        for(int j = 1; j < n+1; j++)
        {
        sum += quick_pow10(n);
        }
    }
    }
    if (argv[2][0] == 'b')
    {
    for(long i = 0; i < outer_loops / n; i++)
    {
        for(int j = 1; j < n+1; j++)
        {
        sum += integer_pow(10,n);
        }
    }
    }

    if (argv[2][0] == 'c')
    {
    for(long i = 0; i < outer_loops / n; i++)
    {
        for(int j = 1; j < n+1; j++)
        {
        sum += opt_int_pow(n);
        }
    }
    }

    std::cout << "sum=" << sum << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Compiled with g++ 4.6.3, using -Wall -O2 -std=c++0x, gives the following results:

$ g++ -Wall -O2 -std=c++0x pow.cpp
$ time ./a.out 8 a
sum=100000000000000000

real    0m0.124s
user    0m0.119s
sys 0m0.004s
$ time ./a.out 8 b
sum=100000000000000000

real    0m7.502s
user    0m7.482s
sys 0m0.003s

$ time ./a.out 8 c
sum=100000000000000000

real    0m6.098s
user    0m6.077s
sys 0m0.002s

(I did have an option for using pow as well, but it took 1m22.56s when I first tried it, so I removed it when I decided to have optimised loop variant)

share|improve this answer
    
Not to be confuse with caf pow. –  brian beuning Sep 2 '13 at 23:00
    
You might be able to initialize your data with a loop. Compiler might be able to optimize that by computing the values before runtime? –  user3728501 Sep 2 '13 at 23:13
    
@EdwardBird: For this purpose, static is faster than a loop, for sure. Since it's probably initialized at compile-time, or at least only once. A loop will initialize every time. –  Mats Petersson Sep 2 '13 at 23:15
    
@MatsPetersson I read something recently about compiler optimizations which compute values at compile time... For example, if you have x = x * 10 * 5 some compilers will change that to x = x * 50. Would a compiler not detect that the loop initializes some values and therefore compute them when compiling so any executable program wouldn't have to? –  user3728501 Sep 2 '13 at 23:19
    
I have just confirmed that g++ at least just makes a global table that is initialized at build-time. –  Mats Petersson Sep 2 '13 at 23:38

There are certainly ways to compute integral powers of 10 faster than using std::pow()! The first realization is that pow(x, n) can be implemented in O(log n) time. The next realization is that x * 10 is the same as (x << 3) + (x << 1). Of course, the compiler knows the latter, i.e., when you are multiplying an integer by the integer constant 10, the compiler will do whatever is fastest to multiply by 10. Based on these two rules it is easy to create fast computations, even if x is a big integer type.

In case you are interested in games like this:

  1. A generic O(log n) version of power is discussed in Elements of Programming.
  2. Lots of interesting "tricks" with integers are discussed in Hacker's Delight.
share|improve this answer
    
For some bigint type, probably. I don't think the question is about that, though. For fixed-size integer types, a lookup table makes it an O(1) operation. (Edit: that's not really fair, though. For fixed-size integer types, n has an upper limit, and if n has an upper limit, even something like O(2^n) is equivalent to O(1) then.) For floating point types, pow is already normally implemented as an O(1) operation. –  hvd Sep 2 '13 at 22:38
1  
@hvd O(1) isn't necessarily faster than O(n), though. –  user529758 Sep 2 '13 at 22:41
    
@H2CO3 Yeah, you're right. O(1) will be faster than O(n) for large enough n, but that isn't saying much when n cannot be more than 20 or so. –  hvd Sep 2 '13 at 22:42
    
Yes, software can calculate pow10() in O(log n) sequential time, but hardware is inherently parallel. It doesn't have to calculate things sequentially (never mind the fact that it could do things sequentially just like software, if it wanted to). So the time complexity point is irrelevant. You're comparing apples and oranges in your sentence about time complexity. –  Mehrdad Sep 2 '13 at 23:24
    
@Mehrdad: Sure, for fixed sized integers you don't even need a parallel version because you can use a look-up table. However, once the size of your integers isn't bounded (other than the size of total available memory) the parallel algorithm the hardware can use won't help you much to get below O(log n). –  Dietmar Kühl Sep 2 '13 at 23:30

An integer power function (which doesn't involve floating-point conversions and computations) may very well be faster than pow():

int integer_pow(int x, int n)
{
    int r = 1;
    while (n--)
        r *= x;

    return r; 
}

Edit: benchmarked - the naive integer exponentiation method seems to outperform the floating-point one by about a factor of two:

h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ cat quirk.c
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>

int integer_pow(int x, int n)
{
    int r = 1;
    while (n--)
    r *= x;

    return r; 
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int x = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; i++) {
        x += powerfunc(i, 5);
    }

    printf("x = %d\n", x);

    return 0;
}
h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ clang -Wall -o quirk quirk.c -Dpowerfunc=integer_pow
h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ time ./quirk
x = -1945812992

real    0m1.169s
user    0m1.164s
sys 0m0.003s
h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ clang -Wall -o quirk quirk.c -Dpowerfunc=pow
h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ time ./quirk
x = -2147483648

real    0m2.898s
user    0m2.891s
sys 0m0.004s
h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ 
share|improve this answer
3  
There are much faster ways to do integer exponentiation. See, e.g., Exponentiation by squaring or Addition-chain exponentiation. –  Ted Hopp Sep 2 '13 at 22:31
2  
Just don't give it -1 as the n. ;) –  Mats Petersson Sep 2 '13 at 22:37
2  
@H2CO3: Surely you want to give it some -O? And why are the results different? –  Mats Petersson Sep 2 '13 at 22:43
2  
I think it's a little unfair to use a constant n in the loop too. –  Mats Petersson Sep 2 '13 at 22:55
1  
@Mehrdad: I suspect a conversion from double to int is worth 10x the time of powerfunc, and in fact, the OP's question is indeed about integer pow(10, n) - which will definitely result in a double cast to int in some way or another. –  Mats Petersson Sep 2 '13 at 23:06

Here is a stab at it:

// specialize if you have a bignum integer like type you want to work with:
template<typename T> struct is_integer_like:std::is_integral<T> {};
template<typename T> struct make_unsigned_like:std::make_unsigned<T> {};

template<typename T, typename U>
T powT( T base, U exponent ) {
  static_assert( std::is_integer_like<U>::value, "exponent must be integer-like" );
  static_assert( std::is_same< U, typename make_unsigned_like<U>::type >::value, "exponent must be unsigned" );

  T retval = 1;
  T& multiplicand = base;
  if (exponent) {
    while (true) {
      // branch prediction will be awful here, you may have to micro-optimize:
      retval *= (exponent&1)?multiplicand:1;
      // or /2, whatever -- `>>1` is probably faster, esp for bignums:
      exponent = exponent>>1;
      if (!exponent)
        break;
      multiplicand *= multiplicand;
    }
  }
  return retval;
}

What is going on above is a few things.

First, so BigNum support is cheap, it is templateized. Out of the box, it supports any base type that supports *= own_type and either can be implicitly converted to int, or int can be implicitly converted to it (if both is true, problems will occur), and you need to specialize some templates to indicate that the exponent type involved is both unsigned and integer-like.

In this case, integer-like and unsigned means that it supports &1 returning bool and >>1 returning something it can be constructed from and eventually (after repeated >>1s) reaches a point where evaluating it in a bool context returns false. I used traits classes to express the restriction, because naive use by a value like -1 would compile and (on some platforms) loop forever, while (on others) would not.

Execution time for this algorithm, assuming multiplication is O(1), is O(lg(exponent)), where lg(exponent) is the number of times it takes to <<1 the exponent before it evaluates as false in a boolean context. For traditional integer types, this would be the binary log of the exponents value: so no more than 32.

I also eliminated all branches within the loop (or, made it obvious to existing compilers that no branch is needed, more precisely), with just the control branch (which is true uniformly until it is false once). Possibly eliminating even that branch might be worth it for high bases and low exponents...

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for mention branch prediction here. –  ZijingWu Sep 3 '13 at 7:16
    
Why do you needlessly pollute your code with these hideous templates?!? It hurts. I almost downvoted you for it... –  cmaster Sep 3 '13 at 16:10
    
@cmaster Because doing this code mainly makes sense if you are using bignums or other types that are not simple integers. If your base is an integer > 1, then using 64 bit ints the naive "multiply self exponent times" is going to be a loop of no more than length 64 before it overflows, which will be faster than my code above. The above code handles bases that are floating point, bignum, rationals, or anything else: and outside of those cases, the above code is not worth running. In the integer base case, it won't be much slower in the worst case, and it may be faster in common cases. –  Yakk Sep 3 '13 at 17:00

A solution for any base using template meta-programming :

template<int E, int N>
struct pow {
    enum { value = E * pow<E, N - 1>::value };
};

template <int E>
struct pow<E, 0> {
    enum { value = 1 };
};

Then it can be used to generate a lookup-table that can be used at runtime :

template<int E>
long long quick_pow(unsigned int n) {
    static long long lookupTable[] = {
        pow<E, 0>::value, pow<E, 1>::value, pow<E, 2>::value,
        pow<E, 3>::value, pow<E, 4>::value, pow<E, 5>::value,
        pow<E, 6>::value, pow<E, 7>::value, pow<E, 8>::value,
        pow<E, 9>::value
    };

    return lookupTable[n];
}

This must be used with correct compiler flags in order to detect the possible overflows.

Usage example :

for(unsigned int n = 0; n < 10; ++n) {
    std::cout << quick_pow<10>(n) << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@cmaster Ok. I tried to improve my answer... I will delete my answer if it is still not useful or incorrect. –  Vincent Sep 4 '13 at 14:11

You can use the lookup table which will be by far the fastest

You can also consider using this:-

template <typename T>
T expt(T p, unsigned q)
{
    T r(1);

    while (q != 0) {
        if (q % 2 == 1) {    // q is odd
            r *= p;
            q--;
        }
        p *= p;
        q /= 2;
    }

    return r;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
well, depends how big the table is... –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 2 '13 at 22:30
    
Yes definitely!!!! –  Rahul Tripathi Sep 2 '13 at 22:30
1  
@OliCharlesworth: Wouldn't it be 20 entries max? log(2^64) < 20 –  Mehrdad Sep 2 '13 at 22:30
    
But I think thats a good option!!! –  Rahul Tripathi Sep 2 '13 at 22:31
    
@Mehrdad: ah, yes, it looks like the OP may only be interested in integer powers. (I was considering the general case, where a large table would screw cache performance...) –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 2 '13 at 22:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.