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This question already has an answer here:

In Ruby, it is reasonable to find code like:

a = 1 and b = 2 and c = 3
print "a = #{a}, b = #{b}, c = #{c}\n"

gets the result:

a = 1, b = 2, c = 3

but I cannot understand why code like:

a = 1 && b = 2 && c = 3
print "a = #{a}, b = #{b}, c = #{c}\n"

the result is:

a = 3, b = 3, c = 3

Could anyone please clarify that for me?

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marked as duplicate by Andrew Marshall, mu is too short, jvnill, falsetru, Godeke Sep 3 '13 at 5:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Both pieces of code simply give a SyntaxError for me. I don't get the results you are seeing. – Jörg W Mittag Sep 2 '13 at 22:41
    
Thanks for editing Andrew, it looks better – bean Sep 2 '13 at 23:11

It's about higher precedence of && operator then and:

a = 1 && b = 2 && c = 3

is equivalent to

a = (1 and b = (2 and c = 3))

which results in

  1. 3 is assigned to c
  2. (2 and 3) which results in 3 is assigned to b
  3. (1 and 3) which results in 3 is finally assigned to a
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This is really helpful, thank you David! – bean Sep 2 '13 at 23:01
1  
You don't explain why 2 && 3 == 3 – Borodin Sep 2 '13 at 23:32
    
@Borodin Logical and evaluates its right argument only if the left operand is evaluated to true Which is valid for any object except nil or false. Right operand is then the result of the expression. But I don't think it need to be mentioned in an answer to OP's question. – David Unric Sep 2 '13 at 23:55
    
@Borodin Your insertion of inner-most parens in my answer find as quite redundant. – David Unric Sep 2 '13 at 23:58
    
@DavidUnric: Fair enough, it is your answer. But we are talking about operator precedence here, and I see no reason why 2 and c = 3 isn't equal to (2 and c) = 3. – Borodin Sep 3 '13 at 0:23

Apart from the priority of the operands, this behaviour is the result of the short-circuit evaluation of logic operators.

When evauating and, if the first operand is found to be false, then there is no reason to evaluate the second. The value of a and b is therefore calculated as a ? b : a.

Likewise, the or operator contracts to a ? a : b.

These optimisations work fine logically, when we don't care about the specific value returned but only whether it is true or false. But it also allows for useful coding idioms, such as

( list = list || [] ) << item

which works because list = list || [] is evaluated as list = list (a no-op) if list is true (non-nil), or list = [] (creating a new empty array) if list has already been initialised, and so is "true".

So an expression like 2 and (c = 3) evaluates to 2 and 3 or 2 ? 3 : 2, so 3.

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