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I'm trying to write a website in Perl with Mason. I setup a server with the following: - Apache with mod_perl with Mason - CGI::Session for managing session - MongoDB for database.

My concern is, each time I connect to my MongoDB database, the connection stays alive until I restart httpd service. Thus, if the maximum connection is reached, I can't open anymore connections.

Does anyone have a way to:

  • either close the connection (which might not be a good idea) ?
  • either have a global pool of db connections knowing the architecture ?
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Needs more details. How are you opening the connections, and where are you keeping the handles? Can you post the code for a minimal but runnable example that exhibits the problem? (In mod_perl, the process outlives each request, so global variables are kept from one invocation to another. You may have a leak there – are you using global variables where you should use lexicals? OTOH, you could use a global variable to store a single connection for all requests.) –  amon Sep 2 '13 at 23:59

1 Answer 1

The MongoDB driver keeps the connection alive as long as your MongoClient instance exists. In an environment like mod_perl, the Perl interpreter is a persistent process and global variables will hang around until they are destroyed.

If you don't want the connections to be persistent, create a MongoClient object with a scope that will end when the HTTP request cycle is complete. The connections will be closed when the objects are garbage-collected.

If you update your question with more details about how you're creating your client objects I can provide a more detailed answer.

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