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How could I convert an XLS file to a CSV file on the windows command line.

The machine has Microsoft Office 2000 installed. I'm open to installing OpenOffice if it's not possible using Microsoft Office.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Open Notepad, create a file called XlsToCsv.vbs and paste this in:

if WScript.Arguments.Count < 2 Then
    WScript.Echo "Error! Please specify the source path and the destination. Usage: XlsToCsv SourcePath.xls Destination.csv"
    Wscript.Quit
End If
Dim oExcel
Set oExcel = CreateObject("Excel.Application")
Dim oBook
Set oBook = oExcel.Workbooks.Open(Wscript.Arguments.Item(0))
oBook.SaveAs WScript.Arguments.Item(1), 6
oBook.Close False
oExcel.Quit
WScript.Echo "Done"

Then from a command line, go to the folder you saved the .vbs file in and run:

XlsToCsv.vbs [sourcexlsFile].xls [destinationcsvfile].csv

This requires Excel to be installed on the machine you are on though.

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6  
In case anyone was wondering, the parameter 6 in the oBook.SaveAs function is the constant for the CSV format. –  ScottF Dec 7 '09 at 14:23
3  
Requires fully resolves path names on my XP instance. –  Andrew Mar 23 '11 at 6:25
    
Works just fine, and not only for xls files, but also xlsx. As said by Andrew, file paths must either be absolute, or in the user "data" directory (I'm not sure what is the exact name in english). I still haven't figured out how to solve that, I'm not doing much vbscript! :) –  plang May 31 '12 at 14:09
2  
I have posted below a slightly modified version which handles file paths better. Thanks ScottF! –  plang May 31 '12 at 14:26
2  
The code converts only the active worksheet. To select another worksheet, add the following line after the oExcel.Workbooks.Open line with the desired index of the worksheet (starts at 1): oBook.Worksheets(1).Activate –  humbads Oct 30 '13 at 18:19

A slightly modified version of ScottF answer, which does not require absolute file paths:

if WScript.Arguments.Count < 2 Then
    WScript.Echo "Please specify the source and the destination files. Usage: ExcelToCsv <xls/xlsx source file> <csv destination file>"
    Wscript.Quit
End If

csv_format = 6

Set objFSO = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")

src_file = objFSO.GetAbsolutePathName(Wscript.Arguments.Item(0))
dest_file = objFSO.GetAbsolutePathName(WScript.Arguments.Item(1))

Dim oExcel
Set oExcel = CreateObject("Excel.Application")

Dim oBook
Set oBook = oExcel.Workbooks.Open(src_file)

oBook.SaveAs dest_file, csv_format

oBook.Close False
oExcel.Quit

I have renamed the script ExcelToCsv, since this script is not limited to xls at all. xlsx Works just fine, as we could expect.

Tested with Office 2010.

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I am using this (with few adaptations) to convert from XML to XLS. However, I don't want to have the compatibility warning message box from Excel during this conversion. Do you know how can I disable this warning? –  jpnavarini Aug 8 '12 at 14:18
    
Hi, I'm sorry, no idea! :) –  plang Aug 8 '12 at 14:28

How about with PowerShell?

Code should be looks like this, not tested though

$xlCSV = 6
$Excel = New-Object -Com Excel.Application 
$Excel.visible = $False 
$Excel.displayalerts=$False 
$WorkBook = $Excel.Workbooks.Open("YOUDOC.XLS") 
$Workbook.SaveAs("YOURDOC.csv",$xlCSV) 
$Excel.quit()

Here is a post explaining how to use it

How Can I Use Windows PowerShell to Automate Microsoft Excel?

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This looks like a good approach. Unfortunately, I couldn't get it going. I'm not familiar with PowerShell, so when I ran into an error I didn't know what to do. I couldn't find a PowerShell-specifc solution: support.microsoft.com/kb/320369 –  Joel Dec 7 '09 at 8:46
    
Here is some tips for powershell and excel, blogs.technet.com/heyscriptingguy/archive/2006/09/08/… –  YOU Dec 7 '09 at 8:53

Why not write your own?

I see from your profile you have at least some C#/.NET experience. I'd create a Windows console application and use a free Excel reader to read in your Excel file(s). I've used Excel Data Reader available from CodePlex without any problem (one nice thing: this reader doesn't require Excel to be installed). You can call your console application from the command line.

If you find yourself stuck post here and I'm sure you'll get help.

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Actually, I have never written any C# ever. But I think I'll give it a crack with the Excel Data Reader. –  Joel Dec 7 '09 at 8:49
3  
A bit overkill don't you think. Smells of NIH. –  John Sep 17 '10 at 9:56
1  
I don't think the Excel Data Reader is NIH. First of all someone else wrote it. Secondly, it solved the problem better than full blown Excel. –  Justin Dearing Mar 24 '11 at 21:12

A small expansion on ScottF's groovy VB script: this batch file will loop through the .xlsx files in a directory and dump them into *.csv files:

FOR /f "delims=" %%i IN ('DIR *.xlsx /b') DO ExcelToCSV.vbs "%%i" "%%i.csv"
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@Rieaux: Regarding your comment-as-an-edit: if this gives the files a double extension, a second simple batch file can rename them. This is drifting into a new question, though; please give it a try and, if you're unable to make it work, post a new question here on SU. –  Jon of All Trades Sep 30 '13 at 20:20

I had a need to extract several cvs from different worksheets, so here is a modified version of plang code that allows you to specify the worksheet name.

if WScript.Arguments.Count < 3 Then
    WScript.Echo "Please specify the sheet, the source, the destination files. Usage: ExcelToCsv <sheetName> <xls/xlsx source file> <csv destination file>"
    Wscript.Quit
End If

csv_format = 6

Set objFSO = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")

src_file = objFSO.GetAbsolutePathName(Wscript.Arguments.Item(1))
dest_file = objFSO.GetAbsolutePathName(WScript.Arguments.Item(2))

Dim oExcel
Set oExcel = CreateObject("Excel.Application")

Dim oBook
Set oBook = oExcel.Workbooks.Open(src_file)

oBook.Sheets(WScript.Arguments.Item(0)).Select
oBook.SaveAs dest_file, csv_format

oBook.Close False
oExcel.Quit
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There's an Excel OLEDB data provider built into Windows; you can use this to 'query' the Excel sheet via ADO.NET and write the results to a CSV file. There's a small amount of coding required, but you shouldn't need to install anything on the machine.

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I tried ScottF VB solution and got it to work. However I wanted to convert a multi-tab(workbook) excel file into a single .csv file.

This did not work, only one tab(the one that is highlighted when I open it via excel) got copied.

Is any one aware of a script that can convert a multi-tab excel file into a single .csv file?

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This looks like it might work.

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Thanks for the link. It does look promising. I'm a bit cautious about installing software from unknown third parties, so I'll wait to see if someone has a MSOffice / OpenOffice solution. I'll definitely consider this though. Thanks. –  Joel Dec 7 '09 at 6:32
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  LittleBobbyTables Nov 13 '12 at 1:24

Scott F's answer is the best I have found on the internet. I did add on to his code to meet my needs. I added:

On Error Resume Next <- To account for a missing xls files in my batch processing at the top. oBook.Application.Columns("A:J").NumberFormat = "@" <- Before the SaveAs line to make sure my data is saved formatted as text to keep excel from deleting leading zero's and eliminating commas in number strings in my data i.e. (1,200 to 1200). The column range should be adjusted to meet your neeeds (A:J).

I also removed the Echo "done" to make it non interactive.

I then added the script into a cmd batch file for processing automated data on an hourly basis via a task.

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1  
I think you should consider posting final version of the code with comments. –  default locale Nov 3 '12 at 6:45

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