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The First one (Code Type 1) is just a basic insertion using SqlCommand and calling stored procedure and calling that insert method under Insert Click Event Handler.

The First one

Code Type 1:

public string InsertUserInformation()
{

    SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString);
    con.Open();

    SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("sp_userinformation", con);
    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

    try
    {
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@UserName", TextBox1.Text);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Password", TextBox2.Text);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@FirstName", TextBox3.Text);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@LastName", TextBox4.Text);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Email", TextBox5.Text);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@PhoneNo", TextBox6.Text);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Location", TextBox7.Text);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Created_By", TextBox8.Text);
        cmd.Parameters.Add("@ERROR", SqlDbType.Char, 500);
        cmd.Parameters["@ERROR"].Direction = ParameterDirection.Output;

        cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

        string strMessage = (string)cmd.Parameters["@ERROR"].Value;

        con.Close();

        return strMessage;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        throw ex;
    }
    finally
    {
        cmd.Dispose();
        con.Close();
        con.Dispose();
    }
}

protected void btnSubmit_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{

    InsertUserInformation();
}

The Second one(Code Type 2) :
http://www.aspdotnet-suresh.com/2010/05/introduction-to-3-tier-architecture-in_17.html

public string InsertUserInformation(BEL objBELUserDetails)
{

    SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString);
    con.Open();

    SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("sp_userinformation", con);
    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

    try
    {
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@UserName",objBELUserDetails.UserName);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Password", objBELUserDetails.Password);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@FirstName", objBELUserDetails.FirstName);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@LastName", objBELUserDetails.LastName);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Email", objBELUserDetails.Email);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@PhoneNo", objBELUserDetails.Phoneno);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Location", objBELUserDetails.Location);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Created_By", objBELUserDetails.Created_By);
        cmd.Parameters.Add("@ERROR", SqlDbType.Char, 500);
        cmd.Parameters["@ERROR"].Direction = ParameterDirection.Output;

        cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

        string strMessage = (string) cmd.Parameters["@ERROR"].Value;

        con.Close();

        return strMessage;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        throw ex;
    }
    finally
    {
        cmd.Dispose();
        con.Close();
        con.Dispose();
    }
}

this is also an insertion but uses BEL,BLL,DAL and finally the BLL layer's insert_method is called under button insert event handler of PL.
As far as i know, 3 tier helps to organize the code into different layers , so that maintenance would be easier and other x factors are there.
But, the First One(Code Type 1) seems to be much simpler to me.
So, please advise me ,
1. why would they refer the Second one, when First one is more simple and easy?
2. what about Performance among two, which one is faster?

Thanks in advance.

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3  
Screenshots of code are annoying. Use actual code blocks that at least have syntax highlighting. – millimoose Sep 3 '13 at 0:31
    
As for performance: code up both and benchmark? (Sight unseen I'm saying "not one that matters".) – millimoose Sep 3 '13 at 0:32
    
Also the first one might seem simple and easy but also it means that nowhere in your application is your data model defined. The second one is used because different concerns should be handled at different layers of the application, and in a language without metaprogramming facilities this unfortunately means some amount of delegation boilerplate in the layers in the cases where those additional concerns aren't there. – millimoose Sep 3 '13 at 0:33
    
For what it's worth, the second example isn't actually great. Generally I wouldn't trust programming blogs that a) don't format code samples, and b) don't explain the concepts involved. – millimoose Sep 3 '13 at 0:49
    
Both examples should use using blocks where appropriate (SqlConnection, in this case). That will ensure the object is properly closed and disposed of even if an error occurs. Secondly, it's generally considered a bad idea to simply rethrow exceptions, as you lose the stack trace. – Tim Sep 3 '13 at 1:17

The first example tightly couples data storage code with UI code. This code can't be used elsewhere in the same project (or other projects) without copying/pasting followed by editing of the textbox names. If there is a new required parameter added to sp_userinformation, and this code has been copied in several places (or other projects), then each usage must be found and updated. The compiler can't help with missing parameters.

Compare this with the second example which uses an object (sometimes referred to as a data transfer object). The second example doesn't directly refer to user interface objects and therefore can be isolated in a seperate class. This same code could be called from other parts of the application or from another application encouraging code reuse. If a new required parameter is added to sp_userinformation then this could also be added to the objBELUserDetails constructor. If some other code doesn't pass in the required parameter with the constructor then the code will not compile. This allows for bugs to be found before deployment. There are many other reasons but you've already hit on some of them, organization, ease of maintenance. Too numerous to discuss here.

As for performance, the first code is likely more perfomant as it simply makes a database call. However, performance typically doesn't take a big hit passing around data transfer objects. It probably takes far longer for the database call to complete than any of the c# code. But, you can always measure to make sure.

Anyways, hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your inputs, it really helped me to understand the difference in a better way, thanks a lot.. :) – Prathap S V Genny Sep 3 '13 at 5:26

The second approach helps you to do the business validation before inserting the data in the database. For example , you want to add business validation that Textbox1.text should be saved in the lowercase and min length is X , in this case if you have two place to update / save the logic you have to write the validation at two place and any change need to propagate in two place , but having a Business Object will allow you to control the data flow before it gets in the database. Related to performance until and unless you are inserting and creating thousands of object , not much difference . But if your project is small scale and POC approach 1 is good options

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