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I am trying to work with midi files, which are just sequences of various types of musical events such as 'note on', 'note off', 'tempo change' etc. In all, there are perhaps 30 different types of these events, each having different numbers, sizes and types of fields. Some of them even have whole strings of any length as fields. The one field all events have in common is a time field specifying how long after the previous event the current event should occur.

I am having some difficulty figuring out how to store and work with midi files in a program. Given how the time field works, storing all these events sequentially is pretty important, but I don't know of a container that can contain multiple types of objects. I could make just one mega-object containing all fields from all event types and only use the fields that are necessary for each specific event, but that seems pretty inefficient. I could also make 30 different vectors and have one master vector keeping track of the order of everything, but that sounds rather nightmarish. What would be the best way to go about this?

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Sounds like an OOP problem to me... –  Quirliom Sep 3 '13 at 1:09
    
It would be very helpful if you posted some source code –  Martin Drozdik Sep 3 '13 at 1:15
    
As blanket as Quirliom's comment is, it is quite accurate to this question as it is presented. You need to take some time to understand how some features of the C++ language, including how you can design OO class hierarchies (and likely polymorphic inheritance models in this case). –  WhozCraig Sep 3 '13 at 1:31
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

what if you use a MusicalEvent interface, like this:

class MusicalInterface
{
    virtual void play(); //I'm guessing here, put the common behavior
    //the timeField, common to all classes
}

class Instance1 : public MusicalIterface
{
    void play()
    {
        //specific implementation
    }
}

class Instance2 : public MusicalIterface
{
    void play()
    {
        //specific implementation
    }
}

and then your vector could be used in the following way:

std::vector<MusicalInterface*> myVector;

myVector.push_back(new Instance1());
myVector.push_back(new Instance2());

Please remember to release the memory at the end.

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Or make it a std::vector<std::unique_ptr<MusicalInterface>> and then you don't have to remember to release the memory at the end. If you can use C++11, that is. –  Nemo Sep 3 '13 at 2:05
    
Thanks this looks like basically what I want if I can get it to work. I'm trying to do vector<MEvent*> X; TempoEvent metaEvent; X.push_back(&metaEvent); where MEvent is the base class of TempoEvent and all the other types of events. There's a bug somewhere in my code atm though. It wouldn't happen to be a basic problem with this tiny bit of code i posted would it? –  Robby Allsopp Sep 3 '13 at 19:31
    
I can not see nothing there, maybe if you post a new answer with the code and the problem, we could help you ;) –  hidrargyro Sep 3 '13 at 21:26
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Check out how MIDI.NET has done it. It is not C++ but C# but the design idea is portable enough.

Hope it helps, Marc (Author of MIDI.NET)

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