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This booth macros are causing a warning, when I try to compile them on a powerpc arch.

#define INNERMUL asm( \
   " mullw    16,%3,%4       \n\t" \
   " mulhwu   17,%3,%4       \n\t" \
   " addc     16,16,%0       \n\t" \
   " addze    17,17          \n\t" \
   " lwz      18,%1          \n\t" \
   " addc     16,16,18       \n\t" \
   " addze    %0,17          \n\t" \
   " stw      16,%1          \n\t" \
:"=r"(cy),"=m"(_c[0]):"0"(cy),"r"(mu),"r"(tmpm[0]),"1"(_c[0]):"16", "17", "18","%cc"); ++tmpm;

#define PROPCARRY \
asm( \
   " lwz      16,%1         \n\t" \
   " addc     16,16,%0      \n\t" \
   " stw      16,%1         \n\t" \
   " xor      %0,%0,%0      \n\t" \
   " addze    %0,%0         \n\t" \
:"=r"(cy),"=m"(_c[0]):"0"(cy),"1"(_c[0]):"16","%cc");

In each line the macros get called, I get this warning by compiler:

../../src/math/mont.c:650: warning: matching constraint does not allow a register

Any one could tell me what this means, and in which way it affects the code? And as I'm really not that used to assembler, maybe some one could help me out, what specially in my case causes the warning?

My system is freeBSD on 32 Bit I'm using gcc4.8.2

EDIT:

Here is the corresponding x86_64 code, which is executed and compiled on x86 without problems:

#define INNERMUL \
asm( \
   "movq %5,%%rax \n\t" \
   "mulq %4       \n\t" \
   "addq %1,%%rax \n\t" \
   "adcq $0,%%rdx \n\t" \
   "addq %%rax,%0 \n\t" \
   "adcq $0,%%rdx \n\t" \
   "movq %%rdx,%1 \n\t" \
:"=g"(_c[LO]), "=r"(cy) \
:"0"(_c[LO]), "1"(cy), "r"(mu), "r"(*tmpm++) \
: "%rax", "%rdx", "%cc")

#define PROPCARRY \
asm( \
   "addq   %1,%0    \n\t" \
   "setb   %%al     \n\t" \
   "movzbq %%al,%1 \n\t" \
:"=g"(_c[LO]), "=r"(cy) \
:"0"(_c[LO]), "1"(cy) \
: "%rax", "%cc")

Maybe this makes more clear what the code's behavior on powerpc's should be.

share|improve this question
    
I don't know PowerPC, but you're asking for argument 0 to be a register - do all the operations where you use %0 as an operand allow a register operand in that place? –  Kerrek SB Sep 3 '13 at 10:24
    
@KerrekSB If this would be the case he would get an assembler error, not a C warning. The C compiler does not check for the asm to make sense. –  Sergey L. Sep 3 '13 at 10:36
    
Since I do a lot of x86 assembly I can guarantee you that "%rax" and "%cc" are not valid clobber identifiers and the compiler will plain ignore them. The proper way is "rax", "cc" –  Sergey L. Sep 3 '13 at 10:40
    
@Sergey L. Are you pretty sure? because this code is part of libtom, and if it would get ignored, the mathlib shouldnt opperate. –  Zaibis Sep 3 '13 at 10:42
1  
I don't believe so, I believe it's a bug that just went "well" by chance. I couldn't find anywhere in the gcc extended asm documentation that you have to prefix clobber identifiers with %. This is an AT&T assembler specific syntax and gcc supports various assembler syntaxes. Clobbers indicate to the compiler those registers that you intend to overwrite which the compiler can't know otherwise about. But as I said before a rax is a very common use register and many instructions use it implicitly, so most likely wherever that code was used that part wasn't critical. But this is speculation. –  Sergey L. Sep 4 '13 at 17:25
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have cy and _c[0] as an input/output variable in both cases. You have properly specified them as both output and input with a matching constraint. This may be PPC specific as in that "1" has an ambiguous meaning in extended asm (register number), I myself only work on x86.

You can get rid of the warning (and any bugs that may be associated with it) by specifying your variable as an input/output variable just once using the "+" output quantifier instead of "=":

#define INNERMUL asm( \
   " mullw    16,%2,%3       \n\t" \
   " mulhwu   17,%2,%3       \n\t" \
   " addc     16,16,%0       \n\t" \
   " addze    17,17          \n\t" \
   " lwz      18,%1          \n\t" \
   " addc     16,16,18       \n\t" \
   " addze    %0,17          \n\t" \
   " stw      16,%1          \n\t" \
:"+r"(cy) \
,"+m"(_c[0]) \
:"r"(mu) \
,"r"(tmpm[0]) \
:"16", "17", "18","cc"); ++tmpm;

#define PROPCARRY \
asm( \
   " lwz      16,%1         \n\t" \
   " addc     16,16,%0      \n\t" \
   " stw      16,%1         \n\t" \
   " xor      %0,%0,%0      \n\t" \
   " addze    %0,%0         \n\t" \
:"+r"(cy) \
,"+m"(_c[0]) \
: \
:"16","cc");

Edit: from the gcc extended asm manual:

Extended asm supports input-output or read-write operands. Use the constraint character ‘+’ to indicate such an operand and list it with the output operands.

Also I am not sure wether "%cc" is a valid clobber identifier, normally you don't prefix those with "%". On x86 the appropriate identifier is "cc".

share|improve this answer
    
This is confusing me a little bit, specially the thing you are saying about cc, so look my eddit, maybe that makes it more clear for us both :) –  Zaibis Sep 3 '13 at 10:40
    
@Zaibis "1" is not a valid storage constraint for x86, thus it is unambiguously interpreted as a matching constraint by the compiler. The appropriate register name is r1 or rax. As far as I can tell in PPC registers have just number identifiers. In that case the compiler won't know how to interpret the "1" constraint - thus the warning. %cc is not a valid clobber for x86 I am sure. The clobber identifiers are never prefixed with % in x86 extended asm. I would assume the same for PPC, but I am not sure because I don't have a PPC machine here to test this. –  Sergey L. Sep 3 '13 at 10:44
    
I just tryed your hint of changing the = into an + but the warnings are still the same. –  Zaibis Sep 3 '13 at 10:49
    
@Zaibis you also have to remove the matching variables from the input part of the asm, check my example. –  Sergey L. Sep 3 '13 at 10:51
    
When I do this i get mont.c:649: error:invalid 'asm': operand number out of range. So it turned the warning into an error. –  Zaibis Sep 3 '13 at 11:57
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