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I'm getting a Segmentation Fault when trying to call a function that is within a object that is part of a vector of "Shape" Pointers

My problem is in this function::

    Point findIntersection(Point p, Point vecDir, int *status)
    {

        Point noPt;
        for (int i = 0; i < shapes.size(); i++)
        {
        	Point temp;
        	cout << "Shapes size" << shapes.size() << endl;
**SEGMENTATIONFAULT HERE >>>>>**        	bool intersect = shapes[0]->checkIntersect(p, vecDir, &temp);
        	if (intersect)
        	{
        		*status = 1;	// Code 1 for intersecting the actual shape
        		return temp;
        	}

        }

        return noPt;
    }

Initially, I am only adding one shape:

void createScene()
{

    image = QImage(width, height, 32); // 32 Bit

    Sphere s(Point(0.0,0.0,-50.0), 40.0);
    shapes.push_back(&s);
    cout << shapes.size() <<endl;
}

So I have a vector of "shapes" which is global. vector shapes;

I have a class shape

#include "Point.h"
#ifndef SHAPE_H
#define SHAPE_H
using namespace std;
class Shape
{
    public:	
    Shape() {}
    ~Shape(){}
    virtual bool checkIntersect(Point p, Point d, Point *temp) {};	// If intersects, return true else false.
    virtual void printstuff() {};

};
#endif

and also a Sphere class

#include "shape.h"
#include <math.h>
#include <algorithm>
using std::cout;
using std:: endl;
using std::min;

class Sphere : public Shape
{
    public:
    Point centerPt;
    double radius;

    Sphere(Point center, double rad)
    {
    	centerPt = center;
    	radius = rad;
    }

    bool checkIntersect(Point p, Point vecDir, Point *temp)
    {
    	cout << "Hi" << endl;
    /*
    	Point _D = p - centerPt;
    	double a = Point :: dot(vecDir, vecDir);
    	double b = 2 * ( Point :: dot(vecDir, _D) );
    	double c = (Point :: dot(_D,_D)) - (radius * radius);

    	// Quadratic Equation
    	double tempNum = b * b - 4 * a * c;
    	if (tempNum < 0)
    	{
    		return false;
    	} else
    	{
    		double t1 = ( -b + sqrt(tempNum) ) / (2 * a);
    		double t2 = ( -b - sqrt(tempNum) ) / (2 * a);
    		double t;

    		if (t1 < 0 && t2 > 0) { t = t2; }
    		else if (t2 < 0 && t1 > 0) { t = t1; }
    		else if ( t1 < 0 && t2 < 0 ) { return false; }
    		else
    		{
    			t = min(t1, t2);
    		}

    		Point p1 = p + (vecDir * t);

    		if (p1.z > 0)			// Above our camera
    		{
    			return false;
    		} else 
    		{
    			temp = &p1;
    			return true;
    		}

    	}
    */
    	return false;
    }
};
share|improve this question
    
The obvious question is how do you populate the "shapes" vector? –  anon Dec 7 '09 at 9:56
    
I don't think this is the problem but the destructor in Shape should be virtual and the checkIntersect and printStuff should probably be pure virtual (remove the {} and replace with = 0) –  Andreas Brinck Dec 7 '09 at 9:56
    
I tried changing it to =0 Still getting that segmenation fault :( –  confused453Student Dec 7 '09 at 10:00
    
Also add code where you add elements to shapes. –  skwllsp Dec 7 '09 at 10:00

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The problem is here:

Sphere s(Point(0.0,0.0,-50.0), 40.0);
shapes.push_back(&s);

at this point, you've created the Sphere s locally on the stack, and you've pushed its address into your vector. When you leave scope, local objects are freed, and so the address you've stored in your vector now points to memory you no longer own and its contents is undefined.

Instead, do

Sphere *s = new Sphere(Point(0.0,0.0,-50.0), 40.0);
shapes.push_back(s);

to allocate the Sphere from the heap so that it persists. Make sure to delete it when you are done with it.

share|improve this answer
    
Or even better, use a shared_ptr<Sphere> –  Billy ONeal Dec 7 '09 at 15:44
    
@Billy: he still has to allocate the memory he passes to the shared_ptr using new, he can't just pass it an address on the stack; so use of shared_ptr doesn't remove the need to understand what's going on with his original code. –  moonshadow Dec 7 '09 at 16:17

You put an address of a local variable in your vector shapes.After exit from your function createScene() this address becomes invalid.

void createScene()
{

    image = QImage(width, height, 32); // 32 Bit

    Sphere s(Point(0.0,0.0,-50.0), 40.0);
    shapes.push_back(&s);
    cout << shapes.size() <<endl;
}
share|improve this answer

Quoting:

Sphere s(Point(0.0,0.0,-50.0), 40.0);
shapes.push_back(&s);

You're putting the address of a local variable in a global collection. Two lines later, s goes out of scope and &s becomes invalid.

share|improve this answer

The problem is your "createScene" function:

void createScene()
{

    image = QImage(width, height, 32); // 32 Bit

    Sphere s(Point(0.0,0.0,-50.0), 40.0);
    shapes.push_back(&s);
    cout << shapes.size() <<endl;
}

The object s has been allocated within the stack frame of the "createScene" function. It is a local variable, and it will be destructed and invalidated as soon as the "createScene" function ends. Therefore, you have put a pointer to a non-existent object into your shapes vector. What you should do, instead, is allocate a Shape object on the heap (perhaps storing it in a boost::shared_ptr?) and put that in the vector.

share|improve this answer

Apparently you do not have a vector of shapes, but a vector of pointers to shapes. In createScene you add a pointer to a local variable to that vector. When the method finishes, that local is destroyed. When you try to do a call on the object later, you try to make a call on an object that does not exists.

You can solve that problem by using boost::shared_ptr as the argument type of you vector.

// definition of you vector
std::vector< boost::shared_ptr< Shape > > shapes;

void createScene()
{

    image = QImage(width, height, 32); // 32 Bit

    boost::shared_ptr< Shape >( new Sphere s(Point(0.0,0.0,-50.0), 40.0) );
    shapes.push_back(s);
    cout << shapes.size() <<endl;
}

UPDATE: You can also use Boost.PointerContainer instead of a smart pointer, if the container is supposed to actually own the objects.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, if you create a boost::shared_ptr to a local, the local still gets destroyted. –  MSalters Dec 7 '09 at 10:04
    
Well, sometimes you have to spell it out really clear. Of course, that is not what I meant, and the sample code I added now should make that clear. –  Björn Pollex Dec 7 '09 at 10:07
    
@MSalters, it is being allocated with "new". –  Michael Aaron Safyan Dec 7 '09 at 10:09
    
Yup, the new code makes the Sphere no longer a local. That's the key change he needs to make. The shared_ptr is not critical, just easy. –  MSalters Dec 7 '09 at 10:45

Your example will not compile like this. This implementation must return a value:

virtual bool checkIntersect(Point p, Point d, Point *temp) {};

If your global vector of shapes contains a NULL pointer, shapes.size() will be non-zero yet shapes[0]->checkIntersect will fail.

In general, use a debugger (gdb, Visual Studio) and step through your code. Check every variable and you will surely find the problem.

share|improve this answer
void createScene()
{

    image = QImage(width, height, 32); // 32 Bit

    Sphere s(Point(0.0,0.0,-50.0), 40.0);
    shapes.push_back(&s);
    cout << shapes.size() <<endl;
}

your Sphere s(Point(0.0,0.0,-50.0), 40.0); here is a local variable that gets destroyed when CreateScene ends. You push &s, a pointer to s into your shapes vector, so once CreateScene finishes (i.e. after the last cout statement above) shapes[0] points to some destroyed object. Change to:

void createScene()
{

    image = QImage(width, height, 32); // 32 Bit

    Sphere* s_p = new Sphere(Point(0.0,0.0,-50.0), 40.0);
    shapes.push_back(s_p);
    cout << shapes.size() <<endl;
}

And don't forget to delete all items in shapes before you remove them from shapes.

share|improve this answer

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