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I wanted to know if there are any built-in ways to continue to next iteration in outer loop in python. For example, consider the code:

for ii in range(200):
    for jj in range(200, 400):
        ...block0...
        if something:
            continue
    ...block1...

I want this continue statement to exit the jj loop and goto next item in the ii loop. I can implement this logic in some other way (by setting a flag variable), but is there an easy way to do this, or is this like asking for too much?

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4  
There actually exists a working goto statement for Python: entrian.com/goto. It was released as an April fool's joke :-), but is supposed to work. –  codeape Dec 7 '09 at 10:17
    
Oh, please don't use that goto joke! It's remarkably clever, but you will be sad later if you put it into your code. –  Ned Batchelder Dec 7 '09 at 13:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 37 down vote accepted
for ii in range(200):
    for jj in range(200, 400):
        ...block0...
        if something:
            break
    else:
        ...block1...

Break will break the inner loop, and block1 won't be executed (it will run only if the inner loop is exited normally).

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Hi, are there any other options like this? Because I want to do another for loop in block1, and like that my code would go 3 levels deep. Weird situation. –  Sahas Dec 7 '09 at 10:24
2  
To me this sounds like you are trying to do something with for loops that would be best approached in a different way... –  Kimvais Dec 7 '09 at 10:27
    
Yes. That's why I didn't use the for..else structure. Now I'd still need for loops, but I'll use flag variables to divert control. –  Sahas Dec 7 '09 at 11:10
    
for...else is often a useful construct, though it can be confusing. Just remember that else means "no break" in this context. –  asmeurer Mar 24 at 18:38

In other languages you can label the loop and break from the labelled loop. Python Enhancement Proposal (PEP) 3136 suggested adding these to Python but Guido rejected it:

However, I'm rejecting it on the basis that code so complicated to require this feature is very rare. In most cases there are existing work-arounds that produce clean code, for example using 'return'. While I'm sure there are some (rare) real cases where clarity of the code would suffer from a refactoring that makes it possible to use return, this is offset by two issues:

  1. The complexity added to the language, permanently. This affects not only all Python implementations, but also every source analysis tool, plus of course all documentation for the language.

  2. My expectation that the feature will be abused more than it will be used right, leading to a net decrease in code clarity (measured across all Python code written henceforth). Lazy programmers are everywhere, and before you know it you have an incredible mess on your hands of unintelligible code.

So if that's what you were hoping for you're out of luck, but look at one of the other answers as there are good options there.

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1  
Interesting. I agree with Guido here. While it would be nice for some cases it would be abused. Another reason for not implementing it is that right now it is pretty straight forward to port code back and forth between C and Python. Once Python starts picking up features that other languages lack this becomes harder. Take for example the fact that you can have an else statement on a for loop in Python... this makes code less portable to other languages. –  eric.frederich Feb 14 '13 at 17:24
    
All hail Guido our BDFL –  JnBrymn Mar 9 at 18:59
    
This is more of a red-heiring than a good counter-argument, but it seems to me that the behavior of for-else is more complicated, more difficult to read, and probably more abused (if not an outright mistake) than named loops would be. I think I would have used a different keyword than else - perhaps something like resume would have been good? You break in the loop and the resume is right after it? –  ArtOfWarfare Jul 21 at 17:35

I think you could do something like this:

for ii in range(200):
    restart = False
    for jj in range(200, 400):
        ...block0...
        if something:
            restart = True
            break
    if restart:
        continue
    ...block1...
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-1: The OP clearly stated that they knew they could do something like this, and this just looks like a messier version of the accepted answer (which predates yours by 8 months, so it couldn't have been that you just missed the accepted answer). –  ArtOfWarfare Jul 21 at 17:31
2  
The accepted answer is not clearer if you've never seen for, else before (and I think even most people who have can't remember off the top of their head how it works). –  asmeurer Jul 21 at 20:08

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