Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an interface and a corresponding object behind it. For example...

  IMyInterface = interface
    function GetSomething: WideString;
    procedure SetSomething(const Value: WideString);
    property Something: WideString read GetSomething write SetSomething
  end;

  TMyObject = class(TInterfacedObject, IMyInterface)
  private
    function GetSomething: WideString;
    procedure SetSomething(const Value: WideString);
  public
    property Something: WideString read GetSomething write SetSomething
  end;

I use this interface to be able to interact with this object across a DLL.

Now I would like to inherit this object and override some of these methods...

  TMyOtherObject = class(TMyObject)
  private
    function GetSomething: WideString; override;
    procedure SetSomething(const Value: WideString); override;

Except I'd like to make the base fields virtual and abstract to basically force the child to inherit these...

  TMyObject = class(TInterfacedObject, IMyInterface)
  private
    function GetSomething: WideString; virtual; abstract;
    procedure SetSomething(const Value: WideString); virtual; abstract;

Can I do this and have the interface still work with these fields? And do I need to define it this way within the interface too? (I know of course all fields in an interface are already abstract)

share|improve this question
3  
Why not tried in compiler by yourself? (learning by doing) - Why would you expect this is not working? –  Sir Rufo Sep 3 '13 at 12:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can indeed do this. A virtual method, abstract or otherwise, can be used to meet an interface contract.

You cannot declare the interface methods to be virtual or abstract. That makes little sense anyway because virtual and abstract are properties of implementation rather than interface.

Finally, you don't need to declare the property again in the implementing object. Since I expect you'll only be referring to these objects via the interface, it makes little point repeating the property declaration.

Here's a simple program to prove the point:

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

type
  IMyInterface = interface
    procedure Foo;
  end;

  TMyObject = class(TInterfacedObject, IMyInterface)
  private
    procedure Foo; virtual; abstract;
  end;

  TMyOtherObject = class(TMyObject)
  private
    procedure Foo; override;
  end;

procedure TMyOtherObject.Foo;
begin
  Writeln(ClassName);
end;

var
  Intf: IMyInterface;

begin
  Intf := TMyOtherObject.Create;
  Intf.Foo;
  Readln;
end.
share|improve this answer
    
So just declare it like normal in the interface, don't even implement it in the base interfaced object, and leave it up to the derived objects to implement it? –  Jerry Dodge Sep 3 '13 at 11:17
    
You only need to declare the property in the interface. That's all. That's because you'll only ever access the object via the interface. –  David Heffernan Sep 3 '13 at 11:18
    
Makes sense, any inheritance of this base object would need to override it anyway. But it's still good to know I can use virtual abstract methods in an interfaced object. –  Jerry Dodge Sep 3 '13 at 11:20
1  
I'm slapping myself in the face for not getting to know interfaces much earlier... –  Jerry Dodge Sep 3 '13 at 11:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.