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I'm trying to make a function that calculates the cubic root through Newton's method but I seem to have an infinite loop here for some reason?

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>

using namespace std;

double CubicRoot(double x, double e);

int main()
{
    cout << CubicRoot(5,0.00001);
}

double CubicRoot(double x, double e)
{
    double y = x;
    double Ynew;
    do 
    {
        Ynew = y-((y*y)-(x/y))/((2*y)+(x/(y*y)));
        cout << Ynew;

    } while (abs(Ynew-y)/y>=e);

    return Ynew;
}
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1  
How close does it get? –  doctorlove Sep 3 '13 at 11:39
    
What output do you get ? Does it appear to be converging, or are the numbers all over the place ? Are you getting NaN outputs ? –  Paul R Sep 3 '13 at 11:43
2  
Because Ynew, y and e don't change (you don't change y and x in loop, so Ynew still leave the same on every iteration). So you don't change any variables and if you don't leave loop after first iteration you will never leave it (perhaps somewhere instead y you must use Ynew or your formula is incorrect). –  user1837009 Sep 3 '13 at 11:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You have not updated your y variable while iteration. Also using abs is quite dangerous as it could round to integer on some compilers.

EDIT

To clarify what I've mean: using abs with <math.h> could cause implicit type conversion problems with different compiles (see comment below). And truly c++ style would be using the <cmath> header as suggested in comments (thanks for that response).

The minimum changes to your code will be:

double CubicRoot(double x, double e)
{
    double y = x;
    double Ynew = x;
    do 
    {
        y = Ynew;
        Ynew = y-((y*y)-(x/y))/((2*y)+(x/(y*y)));
        cout << Ynew;

    } while (fabs(Ynew-y)/y>=e);
    return Ynew;
}
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3  
This is C++. Rather than using fabs, it might be better include the correct header (<cmath>) and use std::abs, which is correctly overloaded for most numeric types. –  Mike Seymour Sep 3 '13 at 11:51
    
@Mike: +1 - the original code wouldn't even compile with my g++ due to the ambiguity of abs with <math.h> - changing to the correct header <cmath> fixes the problem of course. –  Paul R Sep 3 '13 at 11:55
    
Agreed, just wanted to point out the possible error –  Pavel K Sep 3 '13 at 11:55
2  
@robson3.14: No, the C++-specific overloads defined in <cmath> are probably not available in the C header, since C doesn't support overloading. You'll probably only get int abs(int), and then only if it indirectly includes <stdlib.h>. –  Mike Seymour Sep 3 '13 at 16:18
2  
@robson3.14 - for the specification of what's in math.h you have to look at the requirements for math.h, not the relationship between math.h and cmath. In particular, there are additonal function overloads in <cmath> that are not in math.h, including abs(float), abs(double), and abs(long double). –  Pete Becker Sep 3 '13 at 16:39

You can change

    Ynew = y-((y*y)-(x/y))/((2*y)+(x/(y*y)));

to the equivalent, but more recognizable expression

    Ynew = y*(y*y*y+2*x)/(2*y*y*y+x)

which is the Halley method for f(y)=y^3-x and has third order convergence.

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