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I am trying to use pinvoke to marshal a C structure to C#. While I am able to marshal an intptr I cannot find the syntax to marshal a double pointer. Both the int pointer and double pointer are used on the C side to alloc an array of ints or doubles.

Here is the C struct:

struct xyz
{
      int *np;  // an int pointer works fine
      double *foo;
};

And here is the c# class:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
public class xyz
{
    Intptr np;  // works fine
            // double *foo   ?? 
   }

I am unable to find any instructions on how to marc

share|improve this question
    
IntPtr is just a pointer: up to void*; so you can try marshaling "double* foo" as "IntPtr foo"; – Dmitry Bychenko Sep 3 '13 at 12:22
    
IntPtr doesn't mean "pointer to integer". MSDN: The IntPtr type is designed to be an integer whose size is platform-specific. It can point to any data. – 0123456789 Sep 3 '13 at 12:45
    
Clarification: the C code is doing all the alloc/free of memory, so the c# side is blissfully unaware of all of that. – PaeneInsula Sep 3 '13 at 15:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Check out this description for what an IntPtr is. Have you tried using:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
public class xyz
{
    IntPtr np;
    IntPtr foo;
}
share|improve this answer

You seem to think that IntPtr is a pointer to an int. That is not the case. An IntPtr is an integer that is the same width as a pointer. So IntPtr is 32 bits wide on x86, and 64 bits wide on x64. The documentation makes all this clear.

The closest equivalent native type to IntPtr is void*, an untyped pointer.

So your class in C# should be:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public class xyz
{
    IntPtr np;
    IntPtr foo;
}

To read the scalar value that np refers to call Marshal.ReadInt32. And to write it call Marshal.WriteInt32. But more likely, since this is a pointer, the pointer refers to an array. In which case you use the appropriate Marshal.Copy overload to read and write.

For the pointer to double, if the value is a scalar there is no method in Marshal to read or write the value. But again, it is surely an array in which case use Marshal.Copy to access the contents.

share|improve this answer
    
You are confusing IntPtr with an array of pointers. The way to do this, I discovered, is: [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 20)] public IntPtr[] np;. You may find this link helpful:stackoverflow.com/questions/18647501/… – PaeneInsula Sep 5 '13 at 23:54
    
I'm not confused at all. Your ByValArray matches nothing in this question. – David Heffernan Sep 6 '13 at 6:11
    
Let's read my answer again. I stated that "An IntPtr is an integer that is the same width as a pointer." And that "The closest equivalent native type to IntPtr is void*, an untyped pointer." From that it is clear that my understanding of IntPtr is solid. – David Heffernan Sep 6 '13 at 6:19

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