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I'm trying to implement A-Star in Java based on OSM Data. My problem is that my implementation is not working correctly. First of all the path is not the shortest. Second the closedlist contains more 1/3 more nodes in the end as Dijkstra. Thats actuall not that what I expected.

Here is my A-Star code which is based on Wikipedia Pseudocode

public Object[] executeAstar(ArrayList<Arclistentry> data, NodeD start, NodeD dest,long[] nodenur)
{
    openlist = new PriorityQueue<NodeD>(1,comp);
    closedlist.clear();
    openlist.offer(start);
    start.setg(0);
    start.seth(calccost(start, dest));
    start.setf(start.getg()+start.geth());
    while(!openlist.isEmpty())
    {
        NodeD currentnode = openlist.poll();
        if(currentnode.getnodenumber() == dest.getpredessor())
        {
            closedlist.add(currentnode);
            return drawway(closedlist, start, dest);
        }
        closedlist.add(currentnode);
        ArrayList<Arclistentry> entries = neighbors.get((int)currentnode.getnodenumber()-1);
        for(Arclistentry aentry:entries)
        {
            NodeD successor = new NodeD(aentry.getnode(),aentry.getstart(), aentry.getcoorddest());
                float tentative_g = currentnode.getg()+calccost(currentnode,successor);//+aentry.getcost();
                if(contains(successor, closedlist))
                {
                    continue;
                }
                if((contains(successor,openlist))&& tentative_g >= aentry.getcost())
                {
                    continue;
                }

                        if(!contains(successor, openlist))
                        {
                            successor.setpredessor(currentnode.getnodenumber());
                            successor.setg(tentative_g);
                            successor.seth(calccost(successor, dest));
                            successor.setf(successor.getg()+successor.geth());
                            openlist.offer(successor);
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            openlist.remove(successor);
                            successor.setpredessor(currentnode.getnodenumber());
                            successor.setg(tentative_g);
                            successor.seth(calccost(successor, dest));
                            successor.setf(successor.getg()+successor.geth());
                            openlist.offer(successor);
                        }
        }
    }
    return drawway(closedlist,start, dest);
}

My Heuristics will be calculated by using the euclidian distance. But to consider also the cost of the node, the costs are multiplied with the heuristics result. My Data structure contains the following:

private long nodenumber;
private long predessor;
private float label;
private float f;
private float g;
private float h;
private double[] coord = new double[2];

public NodeD(long nodenr, long predessor, double[] coor)
{
    this.nodenumber = nodenr;
    this.predessor = predessor;
    this.coord = coor;
}
public NodeD(long nodenr, long predessor, float label)
{
    this.nodenumber = nodenr;
    this.predessor = predessor;
    this.label = label;
}

and for the arclist I use the following:

private long start;
private long dest_node;
private float cost_;
private double[]coordstart = new double[2];
private double[]coorddest = new double[2];

Contains Function for Priority Queue:

public boolean contains(NodeD o, PriorityQueue<NodeD> al)
 {
     Iterator<NodeD> e = al.iterator();
     if (o==null)
     {
          while (e.hasNext())
          {
             if (e.next()==null)
             {
                 return true;
             }
          }
     }
     else
     {
         while (e.hasNext())
         {
             NodeD t = e.next();
             if(t.equals(null))
             {
                 return false;
             }
             if (((o.getnodenumber()==t.getnodenumber()) & (o.getpredessor()==t.getpredessor()))||(o.getnodenumber()==t.getpredessor() & o.getpredessor()==t.getnodenumber()))
             {
                 return true;
             }
         }
             return false;
     }
     return false;
 }

and contains for ArrayList (because it was not detecting right with the ArrayList.contains function

public boolean contains(NodeD o, ArrayList<NodeD> al) {
           return indexOf(o,al) >= 0;
       }

public int indexOf(NodeD o, ArrayList<NodeD> al) {
        if (o == null) {
            for (int i = 0; i < al.size(); i++)
                if (al.get(i)==null)
                    return i;
        } else {
                   for (int i = 0; i < al.size(); i++)
                   {
                      if ((o.getpredessor()==al.get(i).getpredessor())) //(o.getnodenumber()==al.get(i).getnodenumber()) &&
                      {
                           return i;
                      }
                       else if((o.getpredessor()==al.get(i).getnodenumber())&&(o.getnodenumber()==al.get(i).getpredessor()))
                      {
                          return i;
                      }
                   }
               }
        return -1;
}

The problem is that the algorithm is visiting all nodes. The other problem is the sorted openlist, which is pushing neighbors of the currentnode up, because they have a lower f value. So what I'm duing wrong by implementing this algorithm?

share|improve this question
6  
But to consider also the cost of the node, the costs are multiplied with the heuristics result. This seems fishy. One optimality requirement of A* algorithm is that the heuristic NEVER OVERESTIMATES the cost. If you violate that, (which I suspect you are), then A* no longer guarantees shortest path. There may be issues with your implementation too, but fix your algorithm first. –  SchighSchagh Sep 3 '13 at 12:34
2  
No, A-star is based on the distance travelled PLUS an estimate of the distance yet to travel, which produces an estimate of the final path via this node. You can't just add multiplicative factors in there. If you do, the path will wrongly be judged as worse than it is, which would explain why you end up exploring more nodes than you really need to. –  Kylotan Sep 3 '13 at 12:38
5  
g is the ACTUAL shortest-path cost from the START to the neighboring node. This is computed exactly. h on the other hand, is an ESTIMATE of the cost from the neighbor to the GOAL. g must be the actual cost, and h must not be higher than the actual cost. Note that Dijkstra is a special case of A* when h = 0. –  SchighSchagh Sep 3 '13 at 12:47
1  
@IrgendwPointer: if you've changed the code you're asking about, change the code that is here in this question, or we're just guessing at whatever bugs might exist. –  Kylotan Sep 3 '13 at 15:53
1  
You are creating a new NodeD object ever time you evaluate a link. successor.g is not initialised by your constructor but you compare it to your tentative value. You should also check if your contains function acts as you intended, as it could be checking the hash of your new object instead of its properties. –  Origin Sep 4 '13 at 7:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Recap of all our previous answers:

  • Make sure the A* estimation is a lower estimate otherwise it will wrongly skip parts

  • Do not iterate over all nodes to determine the index of the edges of your current node's edge set in an array

  • When creating new objects to put in your queue/sets, checks should be done on the properties of the nodes
  • If your focus is on speed, avoid as much work as possible by aborting non-interesting searches as soon as possible

I'm still unsure about this line:

if((contains(successor,openlist))&& tentative_g >= aentry.getcost())

What I think you are trying to do is to avoid adding a new node to the queue when you already have a better value for it in there. However, tentative_g is the length of the path from your starting node to your current node while aentry.getcost seems to be the length of the edge you are relaxing. That doesn't seem right to me... Try to retrieve the correct (old) value to compare against your new tentative label.

Lastly, for your current code, I would also make the following changes:

  • Use HashSet for your closedlist. Every time you check if a node is in there, you have to go over them all, which is not that efficient... Try using a HashSet by overriding the hash function of your NodeD objects. The built-in contains-function is much faster than your current approach. A similar argument can be made for your openlist. You cannot change the PQ to a set but you could omit the contains-checks. If you add a node with a bad priority, you will always first poll the correct priority (because it PQ) and could then, when polling the bad priority, just skip it. That's a small optimisation that trades off size of PQ to PQ lookup-operations

  • avoid recalculating stuff (mainly calccost()) by calculating it once and reusing the value when you need it (small time gain but nicer code).

  • try to avoid multiple lines with the same code by placing them on the correct line (e.g. 2 closedlist.add function can be merged to 1 add-call placed above the if condition, if you have something like if(..){doA();doB()}else{doA();doC();} try to put doA() before the if for legibility)
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