Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let say I have this class :

class foo
{
    public foo(Guid guid)
    {
        //some code here
    }

    public foo(Guid guid, bool myBool)
    {
        //some other code here
    }

    //Here I have a bunch of method/properties

    public void GenX(bool french, int width)
    {
        //my method implementation
    }
}

and I have another class that does basically all the same than foo except the implementation of this method public GenX(bool french, int width) and the construtor must be different from foo's implementation.

If I implement bar this way the compiler complain : 'foo' does not contain a constructor that takes '0' arguments

class bar : foo
{
    public bar(Guid guid, bool myBool)
    {
        //some code here
    }

    new public void GenX(bool french, int width)
    {
        //my new method implementation
    }

    //I will be using the implementation of `foo` for the rest of the methods/properties
}

What am I doing wrong? Is this the correct way to do this kind of thing?

If this isn't clear enought I apologies and I will try to make it clearer

share|improve this question
    
Are You sure it's whole code? Shouldn't it be: class bar : foo Please show us line which is causing this error –  Koscik Sep 3 '13 at 12:40
    
Sorry my mistake. I edited the question –  Rémi Sep 3 '13 at 12:41
    
Regarding your bar.GenX method, did you intend to shadow the base's method, or did you mean to override it? –  valverij Sep 3 '13 at 12:44
    
@valverij for now let say this is the desired behaviour. I will have to test in my context to see if I should simply override –  Rémi Sep 3 '13 at 12:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You'll have to make sure that the base constructor is called.

You can do that like this:

class bar : foo
{
    public bar(Guid g, bool b) : base (g)
    {
        // code here
    }
}

Since you haven't specified this in your code, the compiler will try to call the default constructor by default/implicitly. However, since your base class doesn't have a default constructor (because you've specified another constructor, without specifying the default constructor), it cannot call it. Hence, you'll have to tell the compiler what constructor of the base-class it should use.

In the case that the constructor in your inherited class does something completely different then the constructor in your base-class, and you do not whish to reuse the constructor of your base class, you can do this:

class foo
{
   protected foo() 
   { 
      // default constructor which is protected, so not useable from the 'outside' 
   }

   public foo( Guid g ) 
   {}

   public foo( Guid g, bool b) : this(g) 
   {}

   public virtual void GenX() {}
}

class bar : foo
{
   public bar( Guid g, bool b) : base()
   {}

   public override void GenX() {}
}
share|improve this answer
    
I need to do this even if the code in the base constructor doesn't have any value for bar ? –  Rémi Sep 3 '13 at 12:42
    
What exactly do you mean ? –  Frederik Gheysels Sep 3 '13 at 12:43
3  
Also, you may want to declare foo.GenX as virtual, and use the override keyword instead of the new keyword for far.GenX. This will make GenX polymorphic. –  ShellShock Sep 3 '13 at 12:45
    
The code in foo constructor isn't applicable at bar's level. Basically bar have a different constructor and need a different implementation of GenX –  Rémi Sep 3 '13 at 12:45
    
Another question: why does bar inherit from foo ? –  Frederik Gheysels Sep 3 '13 at 12:49

try this :

class foo
{
    public foo(Guid guid)
    {
        //some code here
    }

    public foo(Guid guid, bool myBool,bool fooclass = true)
    {

        if (fooclass)
        {
            //some other code here
        }

    }

    //Here I have a bunch of method/properties

    public void GenX(bool french, int width)
    {
        //my method implementation
    }
}

class bar : foo
{
    public bar(Guid guid, bool myBool,bool barclass = true) : base(guid,myBool,false)
    {
        //some code here
    }

    new public void GenX(bool french, int width)
    {
        //my new method implementation
    }
}                                 
share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't look to be a good way to deal with this. Also i'm in c#3.0 so I can't use default parameter (this wasn't specified in the the question... but how ever was kind of irrevelant to the question) –  Rémi Sep 3 '13 at 13:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.