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I have a date object in python and I need to generate a time stamp in the C locale for a legacy system, using the %a (weekday) and %b (month) codes. However I do not wish to change the application's locale, since other parts need to respect the user's current locale. Is there a way to call strftime() with a certain locale?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The example given by Rob is great, but isn't threadsafe. Here's a version that works with threads:

import locale
import threading

from datetime import datetime
from contextlib import contextmanager


LOCALE_LOCK = threading.Lock()

@contextmanager
def setlocale(name):
    with LOCALE_LOCK:
        saved = locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL)
        try:
            yield locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, name)
        finally:
            locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, saved)

# Let's set a non-US locale
locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, 'de_DE.UTF-8')

# Example to write a formatted English date
with setlocale('C'):
    print(datetime.now().strftime('%a, %b')) # e.g. => "Thu, Jun"

# Example to read a formatted English date
with setlocale('C'):
    mydate = datetime.strptime('Thu, Jun', '%a, %b')

It creates a threadsafe context manager using a global lock and allows you to have multiple threads running locale-dependent code by using the LOCALE_LOCK. It also handles exceptions from the yield statement to ensure the original locale is always restored.

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1  
Note that for setlocale() to succeed, you need that locale installed at the system level. Which, generally speaking, you cannot rely on. For anything that means to be localizable, you need to stay away from strftime, and use a proper i18n library, like Babel. –  ddaa Aug 20 '14 at 17:22
    
is that a typo on saved = locale.setlocale(... ? –  vonPetrushev Oct 20 '14 at 18:57
    
I don't believe there's a typo - if the second argument to setlocale is None then you get the currently set locale returned. –  Daniel Oct 20 '14 at 22:53
    
@ddaa: Thanks for that suggestion. Indeed, one can't rely on those being installed, even if you live in the country for which you're trying to use the locale. Babel is really the way to go, and this should be a separate answer. –  Hugo Mar 15 at 13:02

No, there is no way to call strftime() with a specific locale.

Assuming that your app is not multi-threaded, save and restore the existing locale, and set your locale to 'C' when you invoke strftime.

#! /usr/bin/python3
import time
import locale


def get_c_locale_abbrev():
  lc = locale.setlocale(locale.LC_TIME)
  try:
    locale.setlocale(locale.LC_TIME, "C")
    return time.strftime("%a-%b")
  finally:
    locale.setlocale(locale.LC_TIME, lc)

# Let's suppose that we're french
locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, 'fr_FR.utf8')

# Should print french, english, then french
print(time.strftime('%a-%b'))
print(get_c_locale_abbrev())
print(time.strftime('%a-%b'))

If you prefer with: to try:-finally:, you could whip up a context manager:

#! /usr/bin/python3
import time
import locale
import contextlib

@contextlib.contextmanager
def setlocale(*args, **kw):
  saved = locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL)
  yield locale.setlocale(*args, **kw)
  locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, saved)

def get_c_locale_abbrev():
  with setlocale(locale.LC_TIME, "C"):
    return time.strftime("%a-%b")

# Let's suppose that we're french
locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, 'fr_FR.utf8')

# Should print french, english, then french
print(time.strftime('%a-%b'))
print(get_c_locale_abbrev())
print(time.strftime('%a-%b'))
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that's the locale in all the script i think so be careful –  Philippe T. Sep 3 '13 at 13:56
    
Yes, locale.setlocale() affects the entire program. The try-finally block or the with block sets and restores the locale so as not to disturb the rest of the program. –  Robᵩ Sep 3 '13 at 14:22

take a look to the pytz package

you can use like this

import pytz
UTC = pytz.timezone('UTC') # utc
fr = pytz.timezone('Europe/Paris') #your local
from datetime import datetime
date = datetime.now(fr)
dateUTC = date.astimezone(UTC)

strftime will render in the timezone specified

for have month name in the locale use calendar for example :

import calendar
print calendar.month_name[dateUTC.month] #will print in the locale

inspect more deeply calendar for having more information

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That's interesting, but I need to generate a date stamp with English words for weekdays (%a) and months (%b), not change the timezone. Can pytz do that too? –  MagerValp Sep 3 '13 at 13:43
    
take a look to calendar docs.python.org/2/library/calendar.html#module-calendar and the calendar.month_name method perhaps –  Philippe T. Sep 3 '13 at 13:47
    
Again, it's not what OP wants. calendar.month_name An array that represents the months of the year in the current locale. –  qarma Mar 11 at 12:14

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