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I have a form, defined like this:

form_for(@model) do |f|
    # Really a lot happens here 
end

I was wondering if there is any way I can adjust the very first line: form_for(@model)

First I though that I might be able use a helper function:

def my_form
   if some_condition
      form_for(@model)
   else
      form_for [@model, @nested_model]
   end
end

and then embed it into my form call. Like this:

my_form do |f|
    # Really a lot happens here 
end

But, I get "No block given" error. Can someone point out - why and how to fix it ? Maybe there is any other approach I could use ?

Don't ask me why do I need it. Just to keep things as DRY as possible. Forms should be reusable, you know :D

share|improve this question
    
Can you be a little more clear about what some_condition is all about? Is it accessing some global information somewhere (you didn't pass it as a parameter)? You received an error because your my_form helper isn't designed to accept a block parameter. – lurker Sep 3 '13 at 14:21
    
@mbratch Consider "some_condition" here just as an instance variable from the view. Or a variable, passed to this helper method. Doesn't really matter. What matters is - I want to be able to switch between the "form_for"'s I have – Dmitri Sep 3 '13 at 14:24
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to pass the block to my_form. The way to do that is to include a yield where you want the block to go:

def my_form
   if some_condition
      form_for(@model) { |f| yield f }
   else
      form_for [@model, @nested_model] { |f| yield f }
   end
end

This should take the block you pass in your view:

my_form do |f|
    # Really a lot happens here 
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so kind! Works like a charm. Could you explain, how it basically works ? – Dmitri Sep 3 '13 at 14:40
1  
@Dmitri I added a little explanation. If you Google search "Ruby blocks" you can find lots of details on various ways of handling blocks. Otherwise, let me know if you'd like more detail. – lurker Sep 3 '13 at 14:46
    
OK, thank you. Will take a look deeper into ruby blocks! :) But, still. Thank you very much! – Dmitri Sep 3 '13 at 14:50

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