Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Learning about anonymous classes and have this from Oracle. I am hoping someone can show me what this would look like if I did not use anonymous classes. How would I have done this with a new class?

import javafx.event.ActionEvent;
import javafx.event.EventHandler;
import javafx.scene.Scene;
import javafx.scene.control.Button;
import javafx.scene.layout.StackPane;
import javafx.stage.Stage;

public class HelloWorld extends Application {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        launch(args);
    }

    @Override
    public void start(Stage primaryStage) {
        primaryStage.setTitle("Hello World!");
        Button btn = new Button();
        btn.setText("Say 'Hello World'");
        btn.setOnAction(new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {

            @Override
            public void handle(ActionEvent event) {
                System.out.println("Hello World!");
            }
        });

        StackPane root = new StackPane();
        root.getChildren().add(btn);
        primaryStage.setScene(new Scene(root, 300, 250));
        primaryStage.show();
    }
}

In this example, the method invocation btn.setOnAction specifies what happens when you select the Say 'Hello World' button. This method requires an object of type EventHandler. The EventHandler interface contains only one method, handle. Instead of implementing this method with a new class, the example instead uses an anonymous class expression. Notice that this expression is the argument passed to the btn.setOnAction method.

Source: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/anonymousclasses.html

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried to solve this problem? –  Luiggi Mendoza Sep 3 '13 at 14:36
    
Consider the difference and similarities between a normal top level class and an anonymous class. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 3 '13 at 14:37
    
@LuiggiMendoza I don't know what to do. –  johnny Sep 3 '13 at 14:37
    
really... just create a new class implements EventHandler<ActionsEvent>, I don't see the problem sorry –  Felquir Sep 3 '13 at 14:39
    
In my IDE, I hit F6 for move and it suggests a name. It doesn't need to be harder than that. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 3 '13 at 15:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just create a new non-anonymous class somewhere. I did it as a nested class inside HelloWorld:

public class HelloWorld extends Application {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        launch(args);
    }

    @Override
    public void start(Stage primaryStage) {
        primaryStage.setTitle("Hello World!");
        Button btn = new Button();
        btn.setText("Say 'Hello World'");
        btn.setOnAction(new MyEventHandler());

        StackPane root = new StackPane();
        root.getChildren().add(btn);
        primaryStage.setScene(new Scene(root, 300, 250));
        primaryStage.show();
    }

    public class MyEventHandler implements EvenHandler<ActionEven>
    {
        @Override
        public void handle(ActionEvent event) {
            System.out.println("Hello World!");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So you don't have to put the MyEventHandler class in another file? Or if you did would you just use import? –  johnny Sep 3 '13 at 14:41
    
No, that is not neccesary. You can do it if you want to. I chose to make a nested class file, to keep the answer short. –  Martijn Courteaux Sep 3 '13 at 14:42
    
@Martinj Thanks. –  johnny Sep 3 '13 at 14:42

The EventHandler class is stateless, so all the instances of this class are functionally equivalent. We just need one single instance of this class to perform the handle operation because the functionality of this method depends only on the parameter passed to it, it does not depend on the state of the object as it does not have any.Thus, it should be a singleton. Using Anonymous classes will create a new instance every time a call to setOnAction is executed. To avoid this, you can consider storing an instance of the EvenHandler implementation in a private static final field and reusing it by using static factory method as below:

public class HandlerProvider{
private static final EvenHandler<ActionEvent> EVENT_HANDLER=new ActionEventHandler();

public static EvenHandler<ActionEvent> getEventHandler(){
return EVENT_HANDLER;
}
private static class ActionEventHandler implements EvenHandler<ActionEvent>
    {
        @Override
        public void handle(ActionEvent event) {
            //your action goes here
        }
    }
}

In this way you can avoid unnecessary object creation on each method call.

share|improve this answer

I don't know what to do.

  1. Create a new class that implements the desired interface.1
  2. Move the code from the anonymous class to the new class.
  3. Wherever your anonymous class was used, change it by a new instance of this class.

Applying this to the provided example:

class FooEventHandler implements EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {
    @Override
    public void handle(ActionEvent event) {
        System.out.println("Hello World!");
    }
}

public class HelloWorld extends Application {
    //...
    @Override
    public void start(Stage primaryStage) {
        //...
        btn.setOnAction(new FooEventHandler());
        //...
    }
}

1: Note that the class that implements the interface will follow the rules of any simple class you write, this means it can be a top level class, an inner class or a static inner class.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.