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I have written a simple perl program(Driver.pl) that passes the array by reference and calls the subroutine add in calculate.pm module.

calculate.pm module pushes two values 100 and 500 into the array.

When I prints the array in Driver.pl file, it prints nothing.

Driver.Pl file:

use calculate;
our @my_array;
sub init(){
   $x=1;
   calculate::add($x,/@my_array);
}
init();
for (@my_array){
  print $_; #Prints Nothing.
}

calculate.pm

sub add(){
   my ($x,@arr)=@_;
   push (@arr,100);
   push (@arr,200);
}
1;
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2  
calculate::add($x,/@my_array); should be calculate::add($x,\@my_array); –  edi_allen Sep 3 '13 at 15:06
    
why do you need $x inside add()? –  Сухой27 Sep 3 '13 at 15:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First of all, here is the code you actually want:

File Calculate.pm:

package Calculate;

sub add {
  my ($x, $arrayref) = @_;
  push @$arrayref, 100, 200;
}

1;

File Driver.pl:

use Calculate;

my @array;

sub init {
  Calculate::add(1, \@array);
}

init();

foreach (@array) {
  print "$_\n";
}

What did I do? Well, I fixed all the (syntax-)errors:

  • The reference operator is \ nor /.
  • Loops are for or foreach but never for each. There is an each function that allows us to iterate over collections, but that isn't useful here.
  • Don't use prototypes like (), unless you know exactly what they do, what they mean, and why you have to use them here.
  • Put an explicit package declaration into your library files.

Then there are some severe style issues:

  • Name your packages with uppercase names – lowercase names are reserved for “pragmas”.
  • Declare all variables with my, unless you really need global/dynamic variables. You don't.

And a newline after print can't hurt.

In our add function, we receive an array reference. (If you know C++: Perl references are like pointers, not like C++ references). References are scalars, so we put it into $arrayref. To get the actual array, we dereference it like @$arrayref – but don't do a copy, or you aren't manipulating the original.

You could slurp the remaining arguments into an array, like my ($x, @list) = (1, 2) puts 2 into the array. But in your case, the 2 is an array reference! Therefore the @list contains a single element which is our array reference – but it isn't the same array.

This still isn't elegant code and has architecture problems, but it should now at least compile.

share|improve this answer
    
Its works good. Thanks a ton. Sorry for numerous typos. I typed the code in s.o. editor directly instead of writing and compiling on my local machine first. –  ritesh_NITW Sep 3 '13 at 15:15

This will work as expected. I have removed module for ease of debug.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;


our @my_array;
init();
foreach(@my_array)
{
  print $_; #Prints Nothing.
}

sub init
{
   my $x=1;
   add($x,\@my_array); # Note the backward slash - This is how reference is passed.
}



sub add
{
   my ($x,$arr)=@_;
   push (@{$arr},100); # Note how array is referenced.
   push (@{$arr},200);   
}

Using use strict; and use warnings; is a good practice

share|improve this answer
    
Its works good. Thanks a ton. Sorry for numerous typos. I typed the code in s.o. editor directly instead of writing and compiling on my local machine first. –  ritesh_NITW Sep 3 '13 at 15:18

Assuming the typos are just errors in copying the code here (e.g. /@my_array should be \@my_array), you need to take an array reference in add(), not an array:

sub add(){
   my ($x, $arr) = @_;
   push (@$arr,100);  # or push( @{ $arr }, 100 );
   push (@$arr,200);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Its works good. Thanks a ton. Sorry for numerous typos. I typed the code in s.o. editor directly instead of writing and compiling on my local machine first. –  ritesh_NITW Sep 3 '13 at 15:16
sub init {
   $x=1;
   calculate::add($x,\@my_array);
}

sub add {
   my ($x,$arr) = @_;
   push (@$arr,100);
   push (@$arr,200);
}
1;
share|improve this answer
    
Its works good. Thanks a ton. Sorry for numerous typos. I typed the code in s.o. editor directly instead of writing and compiling on my local machine first. –  ritesh_NITW Sep 3 '13 at 15:13

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