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In the book Implementing DDD, there's mention of creating a TenantId value object. This makes sense to me, as a GUID could be empty which isn't a valid TenantId, so by making a TenantId value object I can protect against this (I also have other value objects like Name, PhoneNumber, EmailAddress, etc):

public class TenantId
{
    public TenantId(Guid id)
    {
        this.SetId(id);
    }

    public Guid Id { get; private set; }

    private void SetId(Guid id)
    {
        if (id == Guid.Empty)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Id must not be an empty GUID.");
        }

        this.Id = id;
    }
}

What I'm interested in, is should I, or should I not, use this TenantId on a service method, something like:

TenantId tenantId = new TenantId(model.TenantId); // model.TenantId being a GUID.

this.tenantService.GetTenant(tenantId);

Or should I use the more raw form in the service method arguments:

this.tenantService.GetTenant(model.TenantId); // again model.TenantId is a GUID.

The book seems to sometimes do it one way and sometime another. What thoughts do people have on the pros and cons of these approaches?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the service doesn't require restricted access to the entity, pass the value object since it is a shared identifier, but I would code it something like this:

public class TenantId : IEquatable<TentantId>
{
    public TenantId(Guid id)
    {
        if (id == Guid.Empty)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("TenantId must not be an empty GUID.");
        }
        _id = id;
    }

    private readonly Guid _id;

    public Equals(TentantId other)
    {
        if (null == other) return false;
        return _id.Equals(other._id);
    }

    public GetHashcode()
    {
        return _id.GetHashcode();
    }

    public override Equals(object other)
    {
        return Equals(other as TenantId);
    }

    public ToString()
    {
        return _id.ToString();
    }
}

However in some cases, a domain service should be invoked only with entities that the user can access in the repository: in those cases, the public interface of the domain service require the entity (even if the implementation just use the identifier).

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks, would you also overload the == and != operators as standard? – Adrian Thompson Phillips Sep 4 '13 at 8:56
    
+1 for excellent point on "the public interface of the domain service require the entity". – Hippoom Sep 4 '13 at 9:02
    
@AdrianThompsonPhillips if your clients are used to them yes, I would override them. – Giacomo Tesio Sep 4 '13 at 12:51

I prefer using Custom Value Object as Aggregate's identity. I think it gives more clue when other developers want to invoke the api. Consider this:

Tenant findBy(String identity); //others may pass an String instance but not id and the compliler can't check it out for you

And you can't add this below method:

Tenant findBy(String name);//assuming name unique but it failed for compiling

Why use the raw type if you have already had a specific type?

Edit

I usually use custom type for repository and application service, for domain service, please refer to @Giacomo Tesio‘ answer. I think the "use the entity directly" makes more sense.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it seems to be unanimous that if you have an immutable value object for something, then it's good to use that when possible (with the exception of domain services that make more sense operating on entities). – Adrian Thompson Phillips Sep 4 '13 at 9:13

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