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I wonder if there is a difference in performance between

checking if a value is greater / smaller than another

for(int x = 0; x < y; x++); // for y > x

and

checking if a value is not equal to another

for(int x = 0; x != y; x++); // for y > x

and why?

In addition: What if I compare to zero, is there a further difference?

It would be nice if the answers also consider an assebled view on the code.

EDIT: As most of you pointed out the difference in performance of course is negligible but I'm interested in the difference on the cpu level. Which operation is more complex?

To me it's more a question to learn / understand the technique.

I removed the Java tag, which I added accidentally because the question was meant generally not just based on Java, sorry.

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1  

You should still do what is clearer, safer and easier to understand. These micro-tuning discussions are usually a waste of your time because

  • they rarely make a measurable difference
  • when they make a difference this can change if you use a different JVM, or processor. i.e. without warning.

Note: the machine generated can also change with processor or JVM, so looking this is not very helpful in most cases, even if you are very familiar with assembly code.

What is much, much more important is the maintainability of the software.

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+1 I've always loved your answers to the question regarding performance and efficiency. Specially because I'm too bad at it :) – Rohit Jain Sep 3 '13 at 15:50
    
@RohitJain Or you realise it's not as easy as just guessing what might be a good idea. It is very hard to find an example which is better for performances reason even if it is more obscure. – Peter Lawrey Sep 3 '13 at 15:56
    
@PeterLawrey +1 Agreed. Obscurity for the sake of performance should not even be considered unless your application needs to run as optimally as possible (Such as running under environments with limited memory/computing abilities, or some ultra-complex simulation that needs as much juice as possible). Otherwise you're wasting all that free space, yo. – Super Cat Nov 17 '15 at 3:02
    
@SuperCat Agreed, and you can prove that the more obscure code is actually faster. ;) This is often missing. BTW The JVM optimises common/specific patterns of code. This means that if you use an uncommon pattern (as far as the JVM is concerned) your code is likely to be slower not faster even if in theory it could be faster if you used a different compiler. – Peter Lawrey Nov 17 '15 at 11:53

There is rarely a performance hit but the first is much more reliable as it will handle both of the extraordinary cases where

  1. y < 0 to start
  2. x or y are messed with inside the block.
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The performance is absolutely negligible. Here's some code to prove it:

public class OpporatorPerformance {
    static long y = 300000000L;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Test One: " + testOne());
        System.out.println("Test Two: " + testTwo());
        System.out.println("Test One: " + testOne());
        System.out.println("Test Two: " + testTwo());
        System.out.println("Test One: " + testOne());
        System.out.println("Test Two: " + testTwo());
        System.out.println("Test One: " + testOne());
        System.out.println("Test Two: " + testTwo());

    }

    public static long testOne() {
        Date newDate = new Date();
        int z = 0;
        for(int x = 0; x < y; x++){ // for y > x
            z = x;
        }
        return new Date().getTime() - newDate.getTime();
    }

    public static long testTwo() {
        Date newDate = new Date();
        int z = 0;
        for(int x = 0; x != y; x++){ // for y > x
            z = x;
        }
        return new Date().getTime() - newDate.getTime();
    }

}

The results:

Test One: 342
Test Two: 332
Test One: 340
Test Two: 340
Test One: 415
Test Two: 325
Test One: 393
Test Two: 329
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+1 On my last run I got Test One: 113 Test Two: 113 on my laptop. – Peter Lawrey Sep 3 '13 at 15:57
2  
You should use System.nanoTime() for benchmarking, that gives you more precision. – Rohit Jain Sep 3 '13 at 15:57
    
@RohitJain, thanks! Somehow I hadn't learned that yet. The thing I like about it is that now I don't need to import java.util.Date. Although, the javadoc does say that "This method provides nanosecond precision, but not necessarily nanosecond resolution (that is, how frequently the value changes) - no guarantees are made except that the resolution is at least as good as that of currentTimeMillis()." So, I wouldn't necessarily trust the accuracy of the extra precision. – TJamesBoone Sep 3 '13 at 16:03

Wonder if nested for each test, same results ?

for(int x = 0; x < y; x++)
{   
  for(int x2 = 0; x2 < y; x2++)  {}   
}

for(int x = 0; x != y; x++)
{
  for(int x2 = 0; x2 != y; x2++) {}    
}
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