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I'm writing a asynchronous library using begin/end, and I need to lock objects.

Currently, I'm doing this using semaphores, but calling semaphore.WaitOne() suspends the thread where it is called. I'd rather use something like BeginWait so it would return immediately and call the callback function when the semaphore is free.

Is there such an object in c#?

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How about blogs.msdn.com/b/pfxteam/archive/2012/02/12/10266983.aspx? Not begin/callback, but task-based. –  Jon Skeet Sep 3 '13 at 16:03
    
What you're asking doesn't make any sense. A thread can't be waiting on a semaphore and doing something else at the same time. Unless you're polling the semaphore periodically. Give us a little more information about what you're trying to do. I think you're asking the wrong question. –  Jim Mischel Sep 3 '13 at 16:07
    
@JimMischel The idea of an asychronous model is to not have threads doing blocking waits at all, not to create new threads just to have them do blocking waits for you. –  Servy Sep 3 '13 at 16:07

2 Answers 2

You can use the WaitAsync method of SemaphoreSlim (.NET 4.5+) to get a Task that will be completed when the semaphore is next available. You can add a continuation to that task to have a callback that will be called when the semaphore is active.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Actually, this is what I ended up with - maybe someone will find it useful:

class AsyncSemaphore
{
    public AsyncSemaphore(int counter, int maxCounter)
    {
        this.maxCounter = maxCounter;
        this.counter = counter;
    }

    private int maxCounter, counter;

    class CallbackObject:IAsyncResult
    {
        private AsyncCallback callback;

        #region IAsyncResult Members

        public object AsyncState { get; set; }

        public System.Threading.WaitHandle AsyncWaitHandle
        {
            get 
            {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
        }

        public bool CompletedSynchronously { get; set; }

        public bool IsCompleted { get; set; }

        public AsyncCallback Callback
        {
            get { return callback; }
            set { callback = value; }
        }

        #endregion

    }

    private ConcurrentQueue<CallbackObject> queue = new ConcurrentQueue<CallbackObject>();

    public IAsyncResult BeginWait(AsyncCallback callback, object state)
    {
        if (callback==null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("callback","callback cannot be null");
        }
        var o=new CallbackObject();
        o.AsyncState = state;
        o.Callback = callback;
        bool execute = false;

        if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref this.counter)>=0)
        {
            o.CompletedSynchronously= execute = true;
        }
        else
        {
            queue.Enqueue(o);
        }

        if (execute)
        {
            callback(o);
            o.IsCompleted = true;
        }

        return o;
    }

    public void EndWait(IAsyncResult r)
    {}

    public void Release()
    {
        CallbackObject execute = null;

        if (Interlocked.Increment(ref this.counter)<1)
        {
            if (!queue.TryDequeue(out execute))
            {
                throw new NotImplementedException("ConcurrentQueue.TryDequeue failed");
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if (counter > maxCounter)
            {
                throw new SemaphoreFullException("Release was called too many times");
            } 
        }

        if (execute!=null)
        {
            execute.Callback(execute);
            execute.IsCompleted = true;
        }
    }
}
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1  
You can use a ConcurrentQueue to avoid the need to lock around the queue, and you can use the Interlocked methods to manipulate counter to avoid needing locking surrounding it. Between both of those you can actually move to an entirely lock-free model. –  Servy Sep 3 '13 at 17:34
    
thanks! I didn't use concurrentqueue because I thought it used locks internally. awesome! –  Arsen Zahray Sep 5 '13 at 12:59
    
also, I'm not sure how to properly implement this code without creating race conditions with Interlocked: if (counter>0) { o.CompletedSynchronously= execute = true; counter--; } –  Arsen Zahray Sep 5 '13 at 13:01
    
code updated. Thanks for the suggestion! –  Arsen Zahray Sep 5 '13 at 13:17

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