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if I do, inStream.read(buffer, 0, 65); Will Java wait for all 65 bytes or will it wait a certain amount of time then just fill the buffer with how many ever it can.

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Is 65 the length of the buffer? –  Josh M Sep 3 '13 at 16:33
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Did you read the Javadoc of the method ? docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/io/InputStream.html –  Julien Sep 3 '13 at 16:38
    
No, I didn't I read the one for ByteArrayInputStream, thinking it's documentation would be just as in-depth and InputStream, however, it wasn't. So, I am receiving data from a device based on which command I send it, lets say I tell it I need 65 bytes. It will then send me the specified 65 bytes. But it can only operate on 'one' thread. So, if something else pops up it will go do that then come back and send me bytes. And I think that causes my read to only return the first amount. Anyway to fix this? Or work around it, other than reading each individual byte? –  Dylan Holmes Sep 3 '13 at 16:49

1 Answer 1

InputStream.read(byte[] b, int off, int len) will read bytes into the given byte[], up to len, and return the number of bytes actually read or -1 if the end of the stream is encountered. It must attempt to read at least one byte (blocking unless it does) unless the end of the stream is encountered, a 0 is given as an argument for the len parameter, or an exception is thrown.

Whether or not the call blocks until len bytes are read is an implementation detail, in particular the default implementation provided in java.io.InputStream will block until len bytes are read, the end of the stream is encountered, or an exception is thrown, however implementations can eagerly return available bytes immediately (as long as there is it least one byte to be read) and still satisfy the method's contract.

To summarize, you should always check the return value to see how many bytes were actually read off the stream.

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