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I have a 2 dimensional matrix:

char clientdata[12][128];

What is the best way to write the contents to a file? I need to constantly update this text file so on every write the previous data in the file is cleared.

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3  
Is this supposed to be a human-readable text file? – dasblinkenlight Sep 3 '13 at 17:01
    
Is the data numbers? Strings? What's going on here? Can you show an example of the data and what you want the file to look like? – Carl Norum Sep 3 '13 at 17:03
    
Duplicate of: stackoverflow.com/questions/4638568/… – sara Sep 3 '13 at 17:04
    
it is strings. example: "4","error_msg","21.1". The file is needed so that I can pull out the data again if needed. So it doesn't have to be human readable in the text file, just when it is pulled out again – mugetsu Sep 3 '13 at 17:47
    
The converse of the problem in How to read an array saved in binary mode to text file in C? – Jonathan Leffler Sep 3 '13 at 22:00
up vote 16 down vote accepted

Since the size of the data is fixed, one simple way of writing this entire array into a file is using the binary writing mode:

FILE *f = fopen("client.data", "wb");
fwrite(clientdata, sizeof(char), sizeof(clientdata), f);
fclose(f);

This writes out the whole 2D array at once, writing over the content of the file that has been there previously.

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how do I read the clientdata from the file after writing? – mugetsu Sep 3 '13 at 17:52
2  
You use FILE *ifp = fopen("client.data", "rb"); fread(clientdata, sizeof(char), sizeof(clientdata), ifp); and add error checking. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 3 '13 at 17:52
3  
This works across machine types because the data is character data. If it were int, say, then the data would not be portable between big-endian and little-endian machines. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 3 '13 at 17:53
    
I am amazed how difficult it was for me to find a good, concise answer to this. Thank you! Thank you, thank you! <3 – Sipty Jun 10 '15 at 14:08

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