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In addition to the main window, I'm trying to create another top level window. The problem is that when I'm setting the second window's hMenu parameter to a non-NULL value, it doesn't show up.

e.g:

This window shows up (hMenu == 0)

case IDC_BUTTON_SEND_COMMAND:
{
    CreateWindowExW(NULL,
                    L"CommandWindow", L"Send Command",
                    WS_VISIBLE | WS_OVERLAPPED | WS_CAPTION | WS_SYSMENU | WS_MINIMIZEBOX,
                    100, 100, 600, 400,
                    NULL,
                    (HMENU)0,
                    (HINSTANCE)GetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_HINSTANCE), NULL);
    break;
}

This window doesn't show up (hMenu == 4)

case IDC_BUTTON_SEND_COMMAND:
{
    CreateWindowExW(NULL,
                    L"CommandWindow", L"Send Command",
                    WS_VISIBLE | WS_OVERLAPPED | WS_CAPTION | WS_SYSMENU | WS_MINIMIZEBOX,
                    100, 100, 600, 400,
                    NULL,
                    (HMENU)4,
                    (HINSTANCE)GetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_HINSTANCE), NULL);
    break;
}

I'm using Windows 7.

share|improve this question
    
GetWindowLong is not compatible with 64bit OSs. Use GetWindowLongPtr instead, that can be used for both 32 and 64bit code. –  IInspectable Sep 3 '13 at 18:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Passing (HMENU)4 as the hMenu parameter to CreateWindowEx to create a top level window tells the system to attach a menu to it. This menu has the menu handle 4. A menu handle (HMENU) is returned from functions like CreateMenu. If the handle is not a valid HMENU window creation fails.

Your observation, that the window doesn't show up is misleading yourself into believing that the window actually exists. The window doesn't exist, and CreateWindowEx returns NULL. Checking return values is advisable, and calling GetLastError when an API call fails is usually quite helpful.

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Alright. but I'm using the hMenu parameter so I will be able to access the different controls handlers by their control ID (hMenu), I don't realy need a menu on my window, and empty menus are not allowed. any solution? –  user2367115 Sep 3 '13 at 19:08
1  
@user The hMenu parameter has an overloaded meaning: If you create a top level window it designates the ID of the menu resource. If you create a child window it is the ID of the control. A child window is a window that has the WS_CHILD window style, a top level window does not. Control ID's are assigned to distinguish between different child windows sharing the same parent. For this reason it does not make sense to assign a control ID to a top level window. A top level window can be identified by its HWND. –  IInspectable Sep 3 '13 at 19:42
    
OK, got it, now I've got some problem that prevent me from making the window top level window, therefore I need to make it child and popup window, but according to microsoft reference the use of WS_CHILD and WS_POPUP is not allowed, what should I do? –  user2367115 Sep 3 '13 at 20:21
    
@user You can create multiple top level windows passing a NULL parameter as the hMenu/control ID. There is no requirement that this value must be unique. If you need to interact with those windows you have the HWND returned by CreateWindowEx. If you have other requirements that prevent you from making those windows top level windows you should start I would suggest to start a new question to keep question and answers focused on a single topic. –  IInspectable Sep 3 '13 at 20:42
    
Correction to my comment above: For a top level window the HMENU parameter designates a menu handle, not a menu resource ID. –  IInspectable Sep 3 '13 at 21:17

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