Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Do global pointers have a scope that exist between threads?

For instance, suppose I have two files, file1.c and file2.c:

file1.c:

uint64_t *g_ptr = NULL;

modify_ptr(&g_ptr) { 
    //code to modify g_ptr to point to a valid address 
}

read_from_addr() {
    //code which uses g_ptr to read values from the memory it's pointing to
}

file2.c:

function2A() {
    read_from_addr();
}

So I have threadA which runs through file1.c and executes modify_ptr(&g_ptr) and also read_from_addr(). And then threadB runs, and it runs through file2.c executing function2A().

My question is: Does threadB see that g_ptr is modified? Or does it still see that it's pointing to NULL?

If that's not the case, what does it mean for a pointer to be global? And how do I ensure that this pointer is accessible between different threads?

Please let me know if I need to clarify anything. Thanks

share|improve this question
    
you would need to declare the pointer as volatile to see immediate updates in different threads on the pointer – thumbmunkeys Sep 3 '13 at 18:24
    
Two words: "synchronization" and "volatile". – cHao Sep 3 '13 at 18:24
3  
volatile does not provide memory consistency guarantees. – user7116 Sep 3 '13 at 18:41
3  
Volatile is useless here, there must be some synchronisation, and the synchronisation itself will ensure that the global data is not cached in one thread while it is modified by the other thread. see stackoverflow.com/questions/2484980/… – Étienne Sep 3 '13 at 18:43
1  
@Étienne: See that first link yourself -- particularly the second useful case. That's precisely what we have here; the other thread is an "external agent". That volatile doesn't guarantee anything about the visibility of the new value is irrelevant. The point is that it forces the compiler to assume the value can change, so something like while (g_ptr); doesn't loop forever when you enable optimization. – cHao Sep 3 '13 at 19:01
up vote 7 down vote accepted

My question is: Does threadB see that g_ptr is modified? Or does it still see that it's pointing to NULL?

Maybe. If accessed without any sort of external synchronization, you're likely to see bizarre, highly non-reproducible results -- in certain cases, the compiler may make certain optimizations based on its analysis of your code which can stem from assuming that a variable is not modified during certain code paths. For example, consider this code:

// Global variable
int global = 0;

// Thread 1 runs this code:
while (global == 0)
{
    // Do nothing
}

// Thread 2 at some point does this:
global = 1;

In this case, the compiler can see that global is not modified inside the while loop, and it doesn't call any external functions, so it can "optimize" it into something like this:

if (global == 0)
{
    while (1)
    {
        // Do nothing
    }
}

Adding the volatile keyword to the declaration of the variable prevents the compiler from making this optimization, but this was not the intended use case of volatile when the C language was standardized. Adding volatile here will only slow down your program in small ways and mask the real problem -- lack of proper synchronization.

The proper way to manage global variables that need to be accessed simultaneously from multiple threads is to use mutexes to protect them1. For example, here's a simple implementation of modify_ptr using a POSIX threads mutex:

uint64_t *g_ptr = NULL;
pthread_mutex_t g_ptr_mutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

void modify_ptr(uint64_t **ptr, pthread_mutex_t *mutex)
{
    // Lock the mutex, assign the pointer to a new value, then unlock the mutex
    pthread_mutex_lock(mutex);
    *ptr = ...;
    pthread_mutex_unlock(mutex);
}

void read_from_addr()
{
    modify_ptr(&g_ptr, &g_ptr_mutex);
}

Mutex functions ensure that the proper memory barriers are inserted, so any changes made to a variable protected by a mutex will be properly propagated to other CPU cores, provided that every access of the variable (including reads!) is protected by the mutex.

1) You can also use specialized lock-free data structures, but those are an advanced technique and are very easy to get wrong

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 Nice answer, and thank you for hopefully quieting the use-volatile-for-thread-synchro ideologues (at least for now, anyway). – WhozCraig Sep 3 '13 at 20:24
1  
@WhozCraig: Sorry, i was away for a bit. :P I didn't say use volatile for synchronization. Ever. Not once. What i did say was to use it to keep the compiler from getting too clever for its own good. Even this answer admits that it does as much, and my only beef with it (and everyone parroting the volatile-is-the-devil party line) is that not one single person in the whole cult has yet to provide conclusive evidence that a mutex actually does (or even promises to do) volatile's job consistently and reliably in all cases. – cHao Sep 4 '13 at 3:33
1  
I completely agree. They have two different purposes, plain and not-so-simple. There are things volatile is designed to accommodate. Just as there are things synchronization objects are designed to accommodate. They do different things, and you'll be just as likely to see me say "synchro-objects are not designed to do that; volatile is" when the situation calls for it as I am about not using volatile for what synchronization objects are designed for. volatile is certainly not the devil, but it certainly can be if not used for what it was intended. =P. Likewise the other way around. – WhozCraig Sep 4 '13 at 3:49
    
@WhozCraig: Also this code could be compiled so that ptr is stored in register. I see no guarantee that this will never happen without volatile. Btw. no one said that volatile is used for synchronization, it is however a prerequisite to use synchronization concepts. – bkausbk Sep 4 '13 at 7:55
1  
@bkausbk: volatile is not a prerequisite to use synchronization concepts. The compiler is not allowed to cache a global variable in a register across a non-inlineable function call like pthread_mutex_lock() because it has no way of knowing if that function might modify the global variable, so it must reload the variable from memory. – Adam Rosenfield Sep 4 '13 at 17:46

This question is the textbook example of what makes concurrent programming difficult. A really thorough explanation could fill an entire book, as well as lots of articles of varying quality.

But we can summarize a little. A global variable is in a memory space visible to all the threads. (The alternative is thread-local storage, which only one thread can see.) So you would expect that if you have a global variable G, and thread A writes value x to it, then thread B will see x when it reads that variable later on. And in general, that is true -- eventually. The interesting parts are what happens before "eventually".

The biggest source of trickiness are memory consistency and memory coherence.

Coherence describes what happens when thread A writes to G and thread B tries to read it at nearly the same moment. Imagine that thread A and B are on different processors (let's also call them A and B for simplicity). When A writes to a variable, there is a lot of circuitry between it and the memory that thread B sees. First, A will probably write to its own data cache. It will store that value for a while before writing it back to main memory. Flushing the cache to main memory also takes time: there's a number of signals that have to go back and forth on wires and capacitors and transistors, and a complicated conversation between the cache and the main memory unit. Meanwhile, B has its own cache. When changes occur to main memory, B may not see them right away — at least, not until it refills its cache from that line. And so on. All in all, it may be many microseconds before thread A's change is visible to B.

Consistency describes what happens when A writes to variable G and then variable H. If it reads back those variables, it will see the writes happening in that order. But thread B may see them in a different order, depending on whether H gets flushed from cache back to main RAM first. And what happens if both A and B write to G at the same time (by the wall clock), and then try to read back from it? Which value will they see?

Coherence and consistency are enforced on many processors with memory barrier operations. For example, the PowerPC has a sync opcode, which says "guarantee that any writes that have been made by any thread to main memory, will be visible by any read after this sync operation." (basically it does this by rechecking every cache line against main RAM.) The Intel architecture does this automatically to some extent if you warn it ahead of time that "this operation touches synchronized memory".

Then you have the issue of compiler reordering. This is where the code

int foo( int *e, int *f, int *g, int *h) 
{
   *e = *g;
   *f = *h;
   // <-- another thread could theoretically write to g and h here
   return *g + *h ;
}

can be internally converted by the compiler into something more like

int bar( int *e, int *f, int *g, int *h) 
{
  int b = *h;
  int a = *g;
  *f = b ;
  int result = a + b;
  *e = a ;
  return result;
}

which could give you a completely different result if another thread performed a write at the location given above! also, notice how the writes occur in a different order in bar. This is the problem that volatile is supposed to solve -- it prevents the compiler from storing the value of *g in a local, but instead forces it to reload that value from memory every time it sees *g.

As you can see, this is inadequate for enforcing memory coherence and consistency across many processors. It was really invented for cases where you had one processor that was trying to read from memory-mapped hardware -- like a serial port, where you want to look at a location in memory every n microseconds to see what value is currently on the wire. (That is really how I/O worked back when they invented C.)

What to do about this? Well, like I said, there are whole books on the subject. But the short answer is that you probably want to use the facilities your operating system / runtime platform provide for synchronized memory.

For example, Windows provides the interlocked memory access API to give you a clear way of communicating memory between threads A and B. GCC tries to expose some similar functions. Intel's threading building blocks give you a nice interface for x86/x64 platforms, and the C++11 thread support library provides some facilities also.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Nice write-up. – WhozCraig Sep 4 '13 at 8:32

My question is: Does threadB see that g_ptr is modified?

Probably. g_ptr is accessed by threadB via read_from_addr(), so the same g_ptr is seen all the time. This has nothing to do with the “intramodular globalness” of g_ptr: it would work just as well if g_ptr were declared static and had internal linkage since, as you have written it here, it appears at file scope before read_from_addr().

Or does it still see that it's pointing to NULL?

Probably not. Once the assignment is made, it's visible to all threads.

The issue here is that if you have two threads accessing shared data where at least one thread is writing to it (which is the case here), you need to synchronize access to it because ordinary memory reads and writes are not atomic. In POSIX, for example, the behaviour under these circumstances is formally “undefined”, which basically means all bets are off and your machine can go rogue-o-matic and eat your cat as far as the standard is concerned.

So you will really want to use an appropriate thread synchronization primitive (e.g. a read/write lock or a mutex) to ensure a well-behaved program. On Linux with pthreads, you'll want to look at pthread_rwlock_* and pthread_mutex_*. I know that other platforms have equivalents, but I have no clue what they are.

share|improve this answer

global variables are available to all the threads.

For Ex:

struct yalagur
{
char name[200];
int rollno;
struct yalagur *next;
}head;

int main()
{
thread1();
thread2();
thread3();
}

now above structure is shared between all the threads.

any thread can access the structure directly.

so this is called shared memory between threads.

u need to use mutex/shared variables / etc concept to update/read/delete the shared memory.

Thanks Sada

share|improve this answer

First of all you should declare pointer as volatile so that each thread always will read the correct address before using it.

Update: ...or at least the compiler will not generate code that caches the address in some CPU registers.

Second, changing the pointer without synchronization is no good idea. You should use some kind of compiler specific interlocked intrinsics. There could be 2 threads that are truly running in parallel on 2 physical cores. While one thread is reading the address, the other thread might already have freed the address. This will of course causes undefined behavior and most often a termination.

Take a look at _InterlockedCompareExchange intrinsic (Microsoft compiler specific) or __sync_val_compare_and_swap (GCC) or other alternatives.

In both threads you should use something like following to change the pointer values.

while (_InterlockedCompareExchange(&GlobalPointer, NewPointer, GlobalPointer) != GlobalPointer) {
    // Sleep or do whatever
}

Update 2: Why volatile IS still be required (Inspired by comments of chao):

lock_mutex(&m); // hypothetical mutex lock

while (g_ptr) {
// Do something
}

unlock_mutex(&m);

Imagine, the compiler could generate following code.

mov esi, [Pointer]
... some more code
... enter mutex
l1:
cmp esi, 0
jne l1
... leave mutex

This could cause an endless loop even if entering the loop (and changing g_ptr) was protected by a mutex because of the fact Pointer was already cached in esi register.

What the compiler may generate with volatile prefix is:

... some more code
... enter mutex
l1:
mov esi, [Pointer]
cmp esi, 0
jne l1
... leave mutex
share|improve this answer
1  
volatile is pretty useless in threading code. When proper locking functions are used, the need for volatile no longer exists. Why? Because these proper locking functions prevent invalid caching of variables. – Cornstalks Sep 3 '13 at 18:46
1  
Take a look at msdn.microsoft.com/de-de/library/vstudio/ttk2z1ws.aspx It is NOT possible to use this intrinsics without variable to be declared volatile! This prevents the compiler from generating invalid code. I will explain it in my post. – bkausbk Sep 3 '13 at 18:49
1  
@Cornstalks: volatile has nothing to do with CPU caching, which is where locking comes into play. It's to prevent the compiler from generating code that avoids rechecking variables. Locking functions won't keep the compiler from thinking g_ptr won't change, and thus holding it in a register. – cHao Sep 3 '13 at 18:51
5  
volatile was neither created, nor intended, for any mechanism of thread synchronization. It is neither needed, nor warranted, for the use-case of this question. And its use isn't a "may be required" prerequisite. It is either required (a classic case is a variable residing on a hardware port memory address), or it isn't (and in this case it is not). – WhozCraig Sep 3 '13 at 19:08
2  
Concerning ANSI C specification: "A volatile declaration may be used to describe an object corresponding to a memory-mapped input/output port or an object accessed by an asynchronously interrupting function. Actions on objects so declared shall not be "optimized out" by an implementation or reordered except as permitted by the rules for evaluating expressions." – bkausbk Sep 3 '13 at 19:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.