Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is a good (easy to read and fast runtime) way of generating combinations of set (set of items) inside other set (set of groups) without intersection with values of the current set (items in the same group)?

For example I have two simple classes. Group that contains a set of Item

public class Group
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public ISet<Item> Items { get; set; }
}

public class Item
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

As result I have a set of groups each one contains a set of items configured like:

var groupA = new Group
{
    Name = "A",
    Items = new HashSet<Item> { 
        new Item { Name = "A1" }, 
        new Item { Name = "A2" }, 
        new Item { Name = "A3" } 
    }
};
var groupB = new Group
{
    Name = "B",
    Items = new HashSet<Item> { 
        new Item { Name = "B1" }, 
        new Item { Name = "B2" }, 
    }
};
var groupC = new Group
{
    Name = "C",
    Items = new HashSet<Item> { 
        new Item { Name = "C1" }, 
        new Item { Name = "C2" }, 
        new Item { Name = "C3" }, 
        new Item { Name = "C4" }, 
    }
};
var groupsSet = new HashSet<Group>();
groupsSet.Add(groupA);
groupsSet.Add(groupB);
groupsSet.Add(groupC);

What is a good way to get from groupsSet combinations like (1) and (2):

1)

A1, B1, C1
A1, B1, C2
A1, B1, C3
A1, B1, C4
A1, B2, C1
A1, B2, C2
A1, B2, C3
A1, B2, C4
A2, B1, C1
A2, B1, C2
A2, B1, C3
A2, B1, C4
A2, B2, C1
A2, B2, C2
A2, B2, C3
A2, B2, C4
A3, B1, C1
A3, B1, C2
A3, B1, C3
A3, B1, C4
A3, B2, C1
A3, B2, C2
A3, B2, C3
A3, B2, C4

2)

A1
A2
A3
B1
B2
C1
C2
C3
C4
A1, B1
A1, B2
A2, B1
A2, B2
A3, B1
A3, B2
A1, C1
A1, C2
A1, C3
A1, C4
A2, C1
A2, C2
A2, C3
A2, C4
A3, C1
A3, C2
A3, C3
A3, C4
B1, C1
B1, C2
B1, C3
B1, C4
B2, C1
B2, C2
B2, C3
B2, C4
A1, B1, C1
A1, B1, C2
A1, B1, C3
A1, B1, C4
A1, B2, C1
A1, B2, C2
A1, B2, C3
A1, B2, C4
A2, B1, C1
A2, B1, C2
A2, B1, C3
A2, B1, C4
A2, B2, C1
A2, B2, C2
A2, B2, C3
A2, B2, C4
A3, B1, C1
A3, B1, C2
A3, B1, C3
A3, B1, C4
A3, B2, C1
A3, B2, C2
A3, B2, C3
A3, B2, C4

When items from the same roup are not intersected with each other, only with items from other groups?

Amount of groups and amount of items in a group may differ.

Order of items inside combination is not relevant.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
This sounds more like a questions for "Programmers": programmers.stackexchange.com –  Reza Shirazian Sep 3 '13 at 19:28
    
Actually it's a practical question of configuration product pricing having different combination of addons, just tried to do specification more clear by simplifying it. –  Zelid Sep 3 '13 at 19:31
    
Before asking a good way, have you tried anything? Where is your bad way? –  I4V Sep 3 '13 at 19:32
    
Bad way is using Cartesian product in LINQ like paqogomez offered, but amount of groups is dynamic. It's not always only 3 groups. –  Zelid Sep 3 '13 at 19:33
2  
@Zelid I am sure you have already read "Computing a Cartesian Product with LINQ" –  I4V Sep 3 '13 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're looking for the Cartesian Product, which can be generated simply using LINQ's SelectMany, or in query syntax:

var query = from a in groupA.Items
            from b in groupB.Items
            from c in groupC.Items
            select new Group()
            {
                Items = new HashSet<Item>() { a, b, c },
            };



var groupsSet = new HashSet<Group>(query);

If you don't know the number of groups at compile time you can use this solution from Eric Lippert to get the Cartesian Product of an unknown number of sequences:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> CartesianProduct<T>(this IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> sequences)
{
    IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> emptyProduct = new[] { Enumerable.Empty<T>() };
    return sequences.Aggregate(
        emptyProduct,
        (accumulator, sequence) =>
        from accseq in accumulator
        from item in sequence
        select accseq.Concat(new[] { item }));
}

Which allows you to write:

var groups = new[] { groupA.Items, groupB.Items, groupC.Items };

var query2 = groups.CartesianProduct()
    .Select(combination => new Group
    {
        Items = new HashSet<Item>(combination),
    });
share|improve this answer
    
This is the first thing I tried, but amount of groups in var groupsSet = new HashSet<Group>(); may differ. It's not always 3 groups inside groupSet –  Zelid Sep 3 '13 at 19:36
    
@Zelid See edit. –  Servy Sep 3 '13 at 19:37
    
@Zelid Also note that this is exactly why people on this site tend to ask people to include what they've tried when asking a question. Had you included your attempt and why it didn't work, it would have made the part that you actually have difficulty with clearer. –  Servy Sep 3 '13 at 19:41
    
I've tried with Cartesian Product with sets specified in compile time, but didn't know how to do when the list of sets is dynamic. Thanks for help, exactly what I need for (1) case! –  Zelid Sep 3 '13 at 19:44

Are you just looking for a Cartesian product?

You might try a join like this:

var product = 
    (from first in groupA 
    from second in groupB 
    from third in groupC             
    select new Group()
        {
            Items = new HashSet<Item>() { a, b, c },
        });
share|improve this answer
    
This is the first what I tried, but amount of groups may differ. –  Zelid Sep 3 '13 at 19:32
    
Do you mean that you want to include all combinations of groupA and groupB as well as combinations of groupB and groupC? –  paqogomez Sep 3 '13 at 19:33
    
I mean that var groupsSet = new HashSet<Group>(); can have any amount of groups, not just 3 groups like in example. –  Zelid Sep 3 '13 at 19:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.