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Is it bad practice to make a jQuery closure simply for the purpose of retaining context?

Example:

{
    testFunction: function() {
        //Instantiate variables etc...

        for (var i = 0; i < columns.length; i++) {
            for (var j = 0; j < columns[i].length; j++) {
                // create a closure so the .then callback has the correct value for x
                var func = function() {
                    var x = new testObject(columns[i][j].Id);

                    // find method returns a jQuery promise
                    x.find().then(function() {
                        // use x for some logic here
                    });
                };
                func();
            }
       }
   }
}

In this case the closure is needed so that the function for the jQuery promise has context for what x is. Otherwise the x variable is changed after the next iteration of the loop. The jQuery promise object gets the value of whatever x was in the last iteration of the loop.

I'm looking for best practices here, just wondering what to do to keep code simple, readable and efficient.

Please note any performance issues that come along with closures/not using closures. References are appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
For 2), that doesn't matter. They act the same as constants would otherwise, I believe, as they're part of the environment of the closure. –  dwarduk Sep 3 '13 at 19:34
    
Just tested it - you are indeed right. I will come clean and say I have never used closures in Javascript, and am about to go test other languages to see where I got that idea from, or if I was just mistaken from the start. –  dwarduk Sep 3 '13 at 19:40
    
.then() is a jQuery promise although the nature of the question does not required jQuery. @JosephSilber for 2 this is inside of another function on an object. I will clarify the question to reflect that. Thanks. –  AndrewK Sep 3 '13 at 19:41
    
@JosephSilber I was getting confused with a lot of my functional programming I've been doing, because of that pesky immutability making me comfy and misunderstanding the concepts. Thanks, Joseph, for clearing that up! –  dwarduk Sep 3 '13 at 19:43
    
@JosephSilber i & j are maintained by the outer closure. I don't need to pass them in because context is maintained for func. When func is defined i & j are defined so when calling it in the next statement, those have the current values of the loop. I agree though that it would be more clear to pass the values in. –  AndrewK Sep 3 '13 at 19:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using a closure is definitely a good practice, but you can simplify it a little:

  1. Pass in the object directly to your closure.
  2. Use an IIFE instead of a named function declaration.
for (var i = 0; i < columns.length; i++) {
    for (var j = 0; j < columns[i].length; j++) {
        (function(x) {
            x.find().then(function() {
                // use x for some logic here
            });
        }( new testObject(columns[i][j].Id) ));
    }
}

Note: you could simplify this code a little by using jQuery's $.each() method, but using a regular for loop is way faster.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, a direct informative answer. –  AndrewK Sep 3 '13 at 19:59

jQuery (or ES5) iterators usually lead to cleaner code compared to loops. Consider:

$.each(columns, function() {
    $.each(this, function() {
        var x = new testObject(this.Id);
        x.find().then(function() {
            // stuff
        });
    });
});

Note that the scoping problem doesn't arise here, since you get a new scope on every iteration automatically. To address the performance question, iterators are slower than loops, but in the event-driven world you hardly need to worry about that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the suggestion. I did upvote your answer, however I awarded the question to @JosephSilber for what I believe is a more direct answer as opposed to simply offering an alternative. –  AndrewK Sep 3 '13 at 19:59

Unfortunately there is no a better way to solve the problem. However, you miss to pass i and j:

for (var i = 0; i < columns.length; i++) {
    for (var j = 0; j < columns[i].length; j++) {
        // create a closure so the .then callback has the correct value for x
        var func = function(i, j) {
            var x = new testObject(columns[i][j].Id);
            // find method returns a jQuery promise
            x.find().then(function() {
                // use x for some logic here
            });
        };
        func(i, j);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

It is ok and it's actually the only way to create a context.

Unfortunately for some reasons I don't really understand there are Javascript engines that limit the number of nested levels of functions you can create to very low numbers so just try to use them only when really needed (e.g. I found that my quite powerful Galaxy S4 with Android only can handle 18 nested levels).

For hand-written code this is not an issue normally, but for generated javascript code it's quite easy to get past those untold limits.

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