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In the code below, is there a better way to reference the object instance from handleClick() than pulling it in as a global?

var Widget = function() {
  this.property = 'value';
  this.bindEvents();
}

Widget.prototype = {

  bindEvents: function() {
    $('button').on('click', this.handleClick);
  },

  handleClick: function() {
    var self = window.Widget;

    console.log(self.property);
  }
}

window.Widget = new Widget();

This question asks the same thing, and the (non-accepted) answer is to pass a callback to $.on() and call the handler from there, passing in the instance as a parameter like this:

bindEvents: function() {
  var self = this;

  $('button').on('click', function() {
    self.handleClick.apply(self);
  });
}

Is this technique of passing the instance around really the right way to do it, or is there still a preferred way besides the two I've shown?

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1  
    
Thanks for the dup links - likely wouldn't have posted my question if I knew to search for $.proxy. Will leave it up though unless there are objections - some good answers and might help someone to see multiple techniques referenced in the code. –  cantera Sep 3 '13 at 19:56
    
FWIW, this was the search I used: stackoverflow.com/… –  Felix Kling Sep 3 '13 at 20:51
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use bind():

bindEvents: function() {
  $('button').on('click', function() {
    this.handleClick();
  }.bind(this)); 
}

But when it comes to IE, that would work only in IE >= 9.

Edit: in legacy IE, you could use, as suggested by @Kevin B in the comment, jQuery's $.proxy():

bindEvents: function() {
  $('button').on('click', $.proxy(function() {
    this.handleClick();
  }, this)); 
}
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In IE, you can use jQuery's version of .bind: $.proxy() –  Kevin B Sep 3 '13 at 19:39
    
@kamituel - thanks, is there any advantage to using .bind() vs. the second approach I showed in my question? –  cantera Sep 3 '13 at 19:43
    
@cantera25: Besides being more concise, no. –  Felix Kling Sep 3 '13 at 19:45
1  
@FelixKling - wouldn't bind() be a little bit faster? (no reaching to the outer scope) –  kamituel Sep 3 '13 at 19:47
1  
I'll answer myself: this SO answer explains why bind() tends to be slower. –  kamituel Sep 3 '13 at 20:08
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The specified technique is called closure, and it is in common use. However, sometimes it is important to pay attention not to cause memory leaks. You can read more about closure here:

How do JavaScript closures work?

and about memory leaks related to closures, here:

Memory leak risk in JavaScript closures

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The object can be passed as eventData to on(), like so:

var Widget = function () {
    this.property = 'value';
    this.bindEvents();
}

Widget.prototype = {

    bindEvents: function () {
        $('button').on('click', {o: this}, this.handleClick);
    },

    handleClick: function (e) {
        var widgt = e.data.o;
        console.log(widgt.property);
    }
}

window.Widget = new Widget();

FIDDLE

This keeps the scope of the event handler as it should be.

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Very interesting approach. Helps me realize that calling the handler within a callback has the advantage of not having to pass the event object around. –  cantera Sep 3 '13 at 19:47
    
@cantera25 - indeed, and this would still be the clicked button inside the event handler, and not the Widget object. –  adeneo Sep 3 '13 at 19:49
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As @kamituel says, bind can be used:

Widget.prototype = {
  bindEvents: function() {
    $('button').on('click', this.handleClick.bind(this));
  },
  handleClick: function() {
    console.log(this.property);
  }
}
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